Here on the NVTC Blog, we’re sharing original content and video from the second annual Capital Cybersecurity Summit that took place on Nov. 14-15, 2017 at The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner.


Talent v2Did you know that 50 percent of cyber job openings are located in the Greater Washington region? Or that there are over 44,000 cyber job openings in the region?

Organizations are getting creative in sourcing cyber talent in maintain a competitive edge. In fact, the talent shortage is becoming a strategic priority for almost every organization in the cyber sector across the country.

The Capital Cybersecurity Summit’s engaging Unique Ways to Attract Top Cyber Talent panel explored innovative ways companies have overcome the cyber talent gap challenges in their organizations. Panelists included U.S. Cyber Challenge National Director Karen Evans, Northrop Grumman Mission Systems Manager, Strategic Analysis, Initiatives & Operations, Cyber & Intelligence Mission Solutions Brian Loggins, Ishpi Information Technologies, Inc. Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer Girish Seshagiri and Cyber Human Capital LLC President and Founder Renee Brown Small. Monster Government Solutions Vice President of Global Strategy and Business Development Susan Fallon moderated.

Emerging from the discussion were unique ways organizations and HR professionals are sourcing – and upskilling – cyber talent. For example:

  • Ishpi Information Technologies has created a customized, “dual-model” apprenticeship program that combines specialized cybersecurity curriculum and on-the-job-training. The program also provides students assistance with security clearances before graduation, which helps to speed up the often long and tedious clearance process.
  • Northrop Grumman is partnering with the academic community, especially at the high school level with students interested in STEM, to source talent and engage students earlier in cybersecurity and computer science career paths. Northrop Grumman also offers cybersecurity scholarships at the high school and college level.
  • Cyber Human Capital’s Renee Brown Small shared that she has found success sourcing cyber talent by working with employees already in an organization who show interest in cybersecurity and upskilling them. Tapping into talent currently in an organization also helps with retention, as employees feel their skills and potential are valued, and that they are being challenged.
  • U.S. Cyber Challenge is bringing together stakeholders from the public and private sectors to host national cyber competitions to identify emerging cyber talent.

For more strategies and insights around recruiting cyber talent, view the full video from the panel below:

Check out Washington Business Journal coverage from the panel.

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On Dec. 15, the NVTC Small Business and Entrepreneur Committee hosted an exciting Teaming, Partnering and Contracting event at the CIT Building in Herndon. The event focused on best practices for teaming in the government contracting space.

Sixteen companies from the region participated by talking with emerging businesses about how smaller companies can do business with established companies, what types of partners they are looking for and potential opportunities for teaming in the future. Participating companies interested in partnering, teaming and subcontracting with small businesses at the event included AMERICAN SYSTEMS, BAE Systems, Blue Canopy Jacobs, Booz Allen Hamilton, CALIBRE, CACI International, CGI Federal, CSRA, Grant Thornton, MITRE Corporation, Noblis, Northrop Grumman, NTT Data, PwC, SAIC and Serco.

The event also hosted a panel discussion featuring Aronson LLC Principal Consultant Tom Marcinko, The Bridge Host and Moderator Jim McCarthy and SAIC Senior Director, Small Business Development and Utilization Office Michael Townsend. The panel touched on various aspects of teaming in government contracting. Washington Business Journal Editor-At-Large Jennifer Nycz-Conner moderated.

Learn more about the Small Business & Entrepreneur Committee here.

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By John Wood, CEO & Chairman, Telos Corporation


John-WoodAt the second annual NVTC Capital Cybersecurity Summit, I was privileged to moderate an amazing panel discussion on “The State of Cloud Security and Compliance: Dispelling the Myth of Cloud Insecurity.”

What made it so amazing were the panelists who represented the “Big 3” of cloud providers: Susie Adams, Chief Technology Officer, Microsoft Federal; Matthew O’Connor, Security Program Manager for Google Cloud Platform, Google; and Doug Van Dyke, General Manager, Public Sector, Amazon Web Services.

Yes, these three companies are in fierce competition – but, they are also passionate advocates of cloud computing and how it can benefit public and private sector enterprises. That passion really showed throughout our wide-ranging conversation.

During the discussion, the panelists shared why federal agencies, which have been slower than the private sector in adopting cloud computing, despite its advantages in terms of security, cost-effectiveness and capabilities, are now finally picking up the pace on cloud adoption. Our panel noted that NIST Special Publication 800-171, with its emphasis on a common language, has increasingly helped decision-makers better understand the security standards required to operate in the cloud and thus enabled them to make more informed decisions.

Susie Adams of Microsoft stated that “The security paradigm has changed,” because “we are no longer just protecting assets that live behind our firewall…there is now a virtual edge you need to protect.” She added that “Identity is the new firewall, and devices are the new edge.” Another key point Susie made was that, “We are going to need to learn to protect data no matter where it is. If you can make that paradigm shift in your head, then you clearly see cloud providers can give you capabilities you didn’t have before.” I responded by noting that automation is key…it takes the work out of the manual security compliance process and puts it in the hands of the systems.

Currently, some 80 percent of federal IT spending is devoted to maintenance, often of outdated legacy IT systems, which is a massive information security risk. This is compared to 20-something percent for maintenance in much of the commercial sector, where businesses have much more readily adopted the cloud and other such innovative technologies. In our discussion on that issue, Doug Van Dyke of AWS observed that “There is a risk in not adopting these new technologies.” So if enterprises truly want to minimize risk, the cloud should be a means to do so. Susie Adams added that if agencies (and others) are not protecting their infrastructure, they are going to have a breach, and that is “why it’s important for the federal government to take advantage and invest in this new technology.”

Asked to identify what might impede or slow down cloud adoption, Google’s Matt O’Connor named two things – a massive breach that could lead to a more cautious posture vis-à-vis the cloud, and overly burdensome regulation, particularly by other nations. He stressed that governments around the world need to collaborate with, not dictate to, the private sector.

We had a very lively discussion on the responsibilities of customers hosting in the cloud environment. Doug Van Dyke said it is wrong for users to assume that security is someone else’s responsibility in the cloud, which he tied back to educating users.  Matt O’Connor summed it up by saying that, in a shared security model, enterprises can look at their cloud security provider as a force multiplier and they should take advantage of what cloud providers have put in place, but they should not neglect their own responsibilities.

We concluded our session with a number of excellent questions from attendees, and Doug Van Dyke summed up the entire discussion best by saying we should mark this date, because we had AWS, Microsoft and Google “all in violent agreement” over the advantages of cloud computing and the need for continued focus on state of cloud security and compliance.

I agreed with that conclusion – to have business rivals all on the same page is memorable. But cloud security and compliance should be an area where there is strong consensus because they are now so intertwined. And I also believe cloud security providers should explore additional methods to further automate security and compliance processes for their customers.

Here’s a link to the entire session (see video below also). I highly recommend it to anyone exploring a move to the cloud who may have some lingering hesitation. It will be worth your while.

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On November 14-15, 2017, NVTC hosted the second annual Capital Cybersecurity Summit at The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner. With over 350 attendees, the Summit highlighted the Greater Washington region’s unmatched set of cybersecurity assets. The Summit featured keynote remarks by Howard Marshall, Deputy Assistant Director, Cyber Intelligence, Outreach and Support Branch at the FBI, and Grant Schneider, Acting Federal Chief Information Security Officer and Senior Director for Cybersecurity Policy at the National Security Council. Engaging panel sessions were led by cybersecurity experts from the public, private and academic sectors, and the Summit’s exhibit hall showcased cybersecurity innovators and companies supporting the region’s cybersecurity industry.

Click here for a full recap of the event.

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1711_Cyber Security Summit 07 v2 1711_Cyber Security Summit 02 v2

View the full gallery here and stayed tuned on the blog for more Capital Health Tech Summit content, video and photos!

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Gartner predicts there will be an estimated 8.4 billion IoT devices by 2020. Tenable President, Chief Operating Officer and Co-Founder Jack Huffard discusses how the proliferation of digital assets and connected devices are creating an exposure gap in cyber defenseand shares how organizations can fight back against cyber-attacks. Huffard participated on the Successful Cybersecurity Growth Companies In the Region panel at the Capital Cybersecurity Summit on Nov. 15, 2017.


jack-huffard-2015-2-webIt’s been more than two years since the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) disclosed one of the largest data breaches in history, but just last week, the agency’s inspector general gave them a failing grade when it comes to critical areas like risk management and contingency planning.

In addition, the data breaches and attacks we’ve recently seen across a variety of industries, including entertainment, critical infrastructure, retail and finance, make it clear that all organizations are still failing when it comes to basic cyber hygiene.

Today, a company’s assets range not just from laptops to servers, but include mobile devices, internet-connected appliances and the cloud. The latest research shows the number of these assets are only going to increase. For example, Gartner predicts there will be an estimated 8.4 billion IoT devices by 2020. And according to a 2016 IDG Enterprise Cloud Computing Survey, 70 percent of organizations already have apps in the cloud and 16 percent more will in 12 months. This modern, elastic attack surface, where the assets themselves and their associated vulnerabilities are constantly expanding, contracting and evolving, has created a massive gap in organizations’ ability to truly understand their cyber exposure at any given time.

Another major component of today’s elastic attack surface is operational technology (OT), particularly given the growth in the risk of cyber-attacks against critical infrastructure sectors. A recent Ponemon Institute study on the state of cybersecurity in the U.S. oil and gas industry found, for example, that OT targets now comprise 30 percent of all cyberattacks. Like cloud and IoT assets, the cyber exposure gap is exacerbated by the mismatch of cyber measures deployed by critical infrastructure companies and the rapid pace of digitization in operations. Operational technologies present an additional challenge – they often can’t be assessed with the same approaches as IT assets, creating blind spots for security operations and compliance teams.

We recently announced a partnership with global engineering and technology leader Siemens that aims to address those unique risks. The product, Industrial Security from Tenable, was designed specifically for industrial control systems and will be delivered through Siemens to give energy and utilities companies full visibility into production networks to reduce compliance risk and their cyber exposure.

Both public and private organizations in every sector need to change their approach to cyber risk to effectively manage their cyber exposure. That starts with understanding and protecting what matters most across their entire attack surface. And it means looking at server and endpoint hardening, IoT discovery and hardening, container and web app vulnerability identification and OT asset and vulnerability detection.

Understanding risk and cyber exposure is also an awareness issue that should start at the top. If the C-suite and board of directors know which areas of their business are secure or exposed, that knowledge can drive strategic business decisions, including where and how much to invest to reduce risk. Attackers will always find the weak link, and right now there are too many weak links – even more than companies are aware of.

This year alone, there were several high-profile, large-scale cyber-attacks, including the NotPetya destructionware, CrashOverride/Industroyer threats to critical infrastructure, and the Reaper IoT botnet. No organization wants to experience one of these security headlines firsthand, which claimed millions of dollars in company damage and compromised sensitive customer data. Only with a holistic approach that starts with basic cyber hygiene – visibility to identify all assets and their vulnerabilities – can companies secure today’s complex attack surface.

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Dominion Energy Power Delivery Group Vice-President of Technical Solutions Kevin Curtis shares an inside look into the efforts underway to modernize the smart energy grid in Virginia.


Curtis v2
Dominion Energy Power Delivery Group Vice-President of Technical Solutions Kevin Curtis

To find one of the fastest-growing economic engines for the Commonwealth, one needs simply look to the heavens. The ability to unlock the potential of the sun’s energy is powering a boom in clean energy jobs in Virginia and supporting our high-tech economy. Along with this solar expansion comes new challenges for the power grid and new opportunities for power companies to meet 21st century consumer expectations.

In just the past month, Facebook and Microsoft provided examples of how solar power is soaring to new heights in Virginia and powering critical business resources. Facebook announced a $1 billion investment in a data center outside of Richmond, which will include a $250 million future investment by Dominion Energy in renewables in the state. Soon after, Microsoft helped commission the 20-megawatt Remington Solar Facility in Fauquier County with Dominion Energy as part of its own commitment to renewable energy.

“The criticality of energy to all of this is a phenomenal concept that we all have to get our heads around,” said Secretary of Technology Karen R. Jackson during a recent webinar hosted by the Northern Virginia Technology Council. “The more we push onto the grid, the more demand there is for quality, reliable power.”

That demand is being felt by us at Dominion Energy. I explained on the webinar that solar expansion has occurred faster than we anticipated. The current power grid wasn’t designed for the variability of solar generation and is being stretched by the proliferation of renewables. Power companies are expected to integrate them seamlessly and to do so while maintaining reliability and keeping costs competitive.

Infrastructure improvements are also needed to help harden critical facilities and protect the grid from escalating cyber and physical threats. Secretary Jackson points to several critical government and private sector customers served by Dominion Energy as an example of the role energy company’s play in ensuring public safety.

The key to addressing these evolving challenges is a modern energy grid, which Dominion Energy sees as essential to a stronger, smarter and cleaner energy future. The company is engaged right now in planning a Grid Modernization initiative to adapt to the solar and security challenges, as well as to be better positioned to meet customers’ rising expectations. Residents and businesses expect power that is always on, helpful information on their energy usage and more control over their power bill. Deploying new technology and hardening our system against power outages can satisfy all these needs, if properly executed.

We value all our customers at Dominion Energy and the Grid Modernization initiative is intended to benefit customers of all types. It is a shining opportunity on our horizon to transform our Commonwealth, our energy future and our economy. It provides Dominion Energy a way to improve on its record of safe, reliable, cost-effective power service. It enables the company to meet the demands for more renewable energy and a reduced carbon footprint. And it can continue to fuel clean energy jobs to provide continued growth to Virginia’s high-tech economy.

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NVTC’s newest guest blog post from Exostar explains why new government regulations are giving organizations a fresh concern when it comes to cybersecurity. Exostar’s Senior Vice President of Product Development Vijay Takanti will be part of the panel discussion, NIST 800-171: Is the Government Paving the Way for Commercial Security? at the 2017 Capital Cybersecurity Summit November 14-15.


exostar v2Cybercrime is on the rise, and could cost businesses over $2 trillion by 2019. These losses could be the result of outright theft, lost productivity, impact to customer confidence or costs associated with repairing breaches. But a new, equally ominous risk associated with cybersecurity is emerging for both government contractors and downstream commercial businesses—the risk of losing current and future contracts due to non-compliance with new government standards.

Department of Defense contracts now include a clause, DFARS 252.204-7012, “Safeguarding Covered Defense Information and Cyber Incident Reporting.” The new clause requires contractors (and their extended supply chains) to implement NIST SP 800-171 cyber safeguards by December 31, 2017 – or at least have a coherent plan for doing so.

NIST SP 800-171 is a set of 110 security controls regulating the handling of sensitive (but not classified) data. Most organizations in the aerospace and defense industry are well aware of these standards and their application to the DFARS mandate by now. However, other organizations, who don’t work directly with the government, may get pulled into NIST 800-171 compliance because of the global, multi-tiered nature of prime contractors’ supply chains.

Keep in mind that the supply chain on any given project can include hundreds or even thousands of suppliers who are privy to controlled defense information (CDI). As the volume of suppliers and the information they exchange rises, the more vulnerable they are to cyber-attack and CDI compromise. Even small pieces of information need to be protected at all times.

The NIST 800-171 rules are designed to best protect this sensitive information as it moves across every level of the supply chain. If even one link in the chain is insecure, it could spell trouble for all parties participating on a government program. Officially, the government can start including NIST 800-171 compliance as a requirement for contracts once the rules are in effect. If organizations are not compliant, they will not be able to bid on those contracts, and existing contracts could be in jeopardy.

Organizations that are not compliant with these new cybersecurity controls run the risk of losing out on business, as primes and larger suppliers select preferred vendors who can demonstrate proper cybersecurity hygiene.

The deadline is looming. Mitigate the latest cybersecurity risk by understanding and implementing the NIST 800-171 security controls now, or find a qualified partner to help you do so.

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The Myth of Cloud Insecurity

October 31st, 2017 | Posted by Alexa Magdalenski in Capital Cybersecurity Summit | Cloud | Guest Blogs - (Comments Off)

Telos Corporation CEO and Chairman of the Board John Wood addresses cloud security in his new guest blog. Wood will be moderating the State of Cloud Security and Compliance panel at the Capital Cybersecurity Summit on Nov. 14-15 at The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner.


John-WoodIt’s not exactly clear when the term “cloud” was first used to describe shared pools for configurable IT resources. However, it’s safe to say that it started creeping into our lexicon less than ten years ago.

Back then, the official definition of cloud was even less clear than it is today. Regardless of what the cloud actually was, this mysterious cloud entity was widely assumed to be unsafe.

That said, even from the beginning, I saw that the cloud offered many security advantages, especially to smaller companies that couldn’t afford to make infrastructure investments and hire many highly-skilled staff to manage complex IT systems in their own on-premises data centers. Still, doubts about cloud security swirled.

But in 2014, a crazy thing happened. Defying conventional wisdom, the CIA, arguably the most security conscious organization in the world, announced their plan to work with Amazon Web Services (AWS) to adopt commercial cloud services. Shortly thereafter, C2S was born.

Even though countless other agencies had already adopted the cloud by 2014 – the CIA and C2S gave the cloud instant credibility. It made federal agencies and highly-regulated commercial organizations realize that if cloud technology is good enough, and secure enough for the CIA, then it must be secure enough for them. Granted, the C2S is an isolated environment, it was noteworthy that CIA made the often trumpeted “cloud first” policy a reality.

AWS recognized early on that security was important to ensure continued, widespread adoption of cloud services. For this purpose they introduced a shared responsibility model to help explain the security benefits you derive simply by hosting your workloads within AWS. Under this model, the customer is responsible for security in the cloud, and AWS is responsible for security of the cloud.

Not only does this shared responsibility model help address a number of security questions, especially in the areas of infrastructure and physical security, it also helps clients demonstrate compliance requirements more quickly and efficiently, because they can inherit results directly from AWS.

AWS certainly isn’t the only cloud service provider (CSP) in the game – Azure and Google also understand how important the message of cloud security and compliance is to drive further cloud adoption.

Despite all of this it is essential for organizations to understand the potential security pitfalls of cloud adoption. It’s essential to know where your cloud service provider responsibility stops and customer responsibility starts. There have been a number of recent breaches resulting from unsecured cloud-based database deployments. Customers need to understand, and take seriously, their responsibility in protecting their systems, their applications and their data.

The cloud has come a long way over the last ten years. Much progress has been made to enhance security and promote these security and compliance benefits. However, there is still work to be done to address lingering security concerns, questions and perceptions to help drive even broader adoption of cloud services.

If you’d like to hear what CSPs have to say about the myth of cloud insecurity, join me on Wednesday, November 15 at NVTC’s Capital Cybersecurity Summit. I will be moderating a panel that will discuss the current state of cloud security and compliance, featuring prominent voices from the big three cloud providers: Google, Microsoft and AWS. I hope to see you there!

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National security is now the number one security concern for Americans, according to the recently-released global 2017 Unisys Security Index, replacing financial security as the top fear from the 2014 survey. Americans’ concerns about internet security, specifically viruses and hacking, rose most dramatically over the last three years, coming in as the number two security concern in this year’s index.

In a world more interconnected by technology than ever, the cyber threat landscape has never been more daunting. Alarmingly, one in three website visitors last year were attack bots and over 94 percent of 100,000 websites analyzed over a 90-day survey period experienced at least one bot attack, according to Imperva’s Bot Traffic Report 2016. Companies and agencies at the frontline of protecting the country and consumers from cyber-attack face countless challenges beyond the cybersecurity threats themselves.

2017 Cybersecurity Infographic v102317

NVTC 2017 Cybersecurity SitRep

NVTC’s newest infographic provides an updated look into NVTC members’ cybersecurity hiring and resource allocation trends while reiterating the key takeaway of last year’s cyber infographic: The human element exposes us to the greatest cyber risk, from cyber talent to employee training to insider threats.

Acquiring top cyber talent remains a priority to NVTC members, with 50 percent reporting they will hire cyber professionals over the next 12 months, a five percent decrease from last year. Employee training is the single greatest focus for our members with 50 percent reporting it as their greatest cyber resource allocation, while 42 percent are targeting a technical solution first. The human element – both human error and insider threats – was acknowledged as the greatest cyber threat facing the country today.

Cybersecurity Talent Gap Continues to Widen in 2017

Organizations are experiencing tremendous difficulties filling cybersecurity positions and retaining skilled talent in these positions. By 2022, it is predicted there will be a shortfall of 1.8 million cybersecurity professionals in the U.S. In Greater Washington alone, there are over 44,000 open cybersecurity positions.

The 50 percent of NVTC members reporting cyber hiring needs are in stiff competition to attract the cyber talent with the experience, skills and certifications they require to be competitive in today’s marketplace. Local tech employers are looking for creative ways to engage new talent pools to fill their cyber workforces, using models such as NVTC’s own Tech Talent Employer Collective, which uses the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s Talent Pipeline Management methodology to put employers into the driver’s seat, setting the workforce development requirements around shared employer needs.

Cybersecurity Venture Funding In the Region Remains Steady

While it is unlikely we will again see cyber ventures play such an outsized role in venture funding such as in 2015 when 46 percent of all funding went to cybersecurity services and products, a steady stream of cyber venture funding continues in Greater Washington, with $210 million collected in calendar year 2016 and $173.2 million from Q4 2016 through Q3 2017.

This support network, including incubators and innovators from MACH37 to In-Q-Tel to CYBERCOM at Ft. Meade, enables a community with innovation capacity and the agility to rapidly evolve to meet the ever-growing cyber threat.

Evolving Cyber Threat Vectors

Internet crimes reported to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) in 2016 represented more than $1.3 billion in losses. Those nearly 300,000 reported crimes are only estimated to be 15 percent of all internet crimes that took place. This year’s numbers so far show that things continue to rise – distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks alone showed a 380 percent increase in Q1 2017 over Q1 2016.

Even with the rise of more sophisticated bot attacks and ransomware, 63 percent of NVTC members rank the human element as the cyber threat requiring their greatest focus. A recent study on email threats estimates that one in four emails appearing to come from a dot-gov domain is a phishing attempt and three out of four organizations reported being the victim of a phishing attack in 2016.

The threat landscape seems even more ominous when you add in the increasing sophistication of the methods used in spear phishing, a more targeted attack that often spoofs more realistic identities known to the victim; the days of being asked to help move royal gold reserves out of Africa are being replaced by seemingly innocuous requests from “Randy in accounting” to take a look at an attached spreadsheet. Despite this increasing threat, progress is being made through awareness and training programs teaching how to stay secure and safe in the current environment, an approach being adopted by all industry sectors, not just IT.

Community Threats Need a Community Response

We are lucky to reside in the nation’s cyber capital, where the resources and environment support cyber innovation and where the nation’s most qualified cyber workforce lives and works. Perhaps Greater Washington’s biggest advantage in cybersecurity is the collaboration happening in the region. Each day stakeholders from the private, public, incubator and academic communities come together to work on the biggest cyber threats.

To deepen cyber collaboration in the region, NVTC will be hosting the second annual Capital Cybersecurity Summit on November 14-15, 2017 at The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner. At the Summit, the nation’s cyber leaders will share their unique insights and best practices into topics such as attracting top cyber talent, cloud security, cyber risk management, strengthening cybersecurity through public-private partnerships and more. Attendees will have unmatched networking opportunities to discuss their latest innovations and the cyber challenges they face. Get the latest Summit agenda here.

View NVTC’s 2017 cybersecurity infographic at www.NVTC.org/2017CybersecurityInfographic

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How will modernizing Virginia’s power grid will be essential for a stronger, smarter and greener energy future? Virginia Secretary of Technology Karen Jackson and Dominion Energy Vice President Technical Solutions Kevin Curtis provide their expert insights on the topic in a new webinar sponsored by the NVTC Data Center and Cloud Infrastructure Committee. Get a recap below.


On October 25, NVTC members had the opportunity to participate in a webinar sponsored by NVTC’s Data Center and Cloud Infrastructure Committee where they heard from Virginia Secretary of Technology Karen Jackson and Dominion Energy Vice President Technical Solutions Kevin Curtis as they discussed the smart energy grid and steps needed to prepare for Virginia’s high-tech economy, future growth and business, and consumer expectations.

The webinar, which was moderated by RagingWire Data Centers Vice President Data Center Operations Phillip Sandino, focused on the changing expectations Virginia businesses and consumers have around energy and new infrastructure and the ongoing efforts to maintain reliability, address resiliency, protect physical and cybersecurity, and integrate more renewable resources.

The speakers discussed how modernizing the power grid will be essential for a stronger, smarter and greener energy future. Kevin Curtis shared Dominion Energy’s perspective on grid modernization and the need to integrate renewables and distributed energy resources, help customers optimize energy use and save money, improve resiliency and reliability, and strengthen physical and cybersecurity. He observed that Dominion Energy has significantly grown its renewable energy generation in Virginia, with solar in particular growing from 1.18 MW in operation at the beginning of 2015 to 744 MW in operation or under development as of August 2017, with plans to add at least 5,200 MW of solar over the next two decades.

Secretary Jackson discussed the reliance many new technologies and applications will have on the smart energy grid, including applications to support Internet of Things (IoT), smart cities, and autonomous vehicles. She observed that service demand patterns are changing from Virginia businesses and consumers with increased emphasis on higher capacity, increased reliability and more security for power and the grid. The session also featured Q&A between the webinar participants and presenters.

Replay the full webinar here or below:

View slides from the webinar or below:

 

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