Tell us: Which Company has the Most Innovative Technology?

February 24th, 2014 | Posted by Sarah Jones in Uncategorized - (Comments Off)

It’s almost spring (we’re counting the days) and that means that Destination Innovation is fast approaching! The yearly event is presented by the NVTC Technology Innovations Committee and Capital Business, and highlights technology advancements emerging from our region.

This year, in addition to an exhibition, networking, industry speakers and innovation pitches, an exciting new element has been added: online voting! Twenty-nine innovative companies will compete in four categories for online votes on the Capital Business website in round one of the competition. In week one, voters selected their favorite companies in the Social Category. You can vote in the Commerce Category now through March 7.

Online voting for the remaining two categories will take place later this month:

  • Government (3/10 – 3/14)
  • Security (3/17 – 3/21)

The top four companies in each category will then exhibit and compete during the Destination Innovation event on April 2, 2014 at The Washington Post headquarters.

Pick your favorite company and let your voice be heard!

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On March 25, Phebe Novakovic, CEO of General Dynamics, will deliver the final address of the of the 2013-2014 Titans breakfast season. And the year has flown by with many great speakers! To recap, this season has featured:

-          U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia

-          U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and former Solicitor General Ted Olson

-          Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Director Arati Prabhakar

-          Now-retired BAE Systems President and CEO Linda Hudson

Click on the links above to check out past news articles featuring the speakers, or watch a clip of their speeches below.

We hope you join us on March 25 for Phebe Novakovic’s Titans address! Click here to learn more and to register.

C-SPAN’s Coverage of Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

 

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In Case You Missed It: Linda Hudson

February 4th, 2014 | Posted by Sarah Jones in Events - (Comments Off)

1401__titanslindahudson079webOn Jan. 30, Linda Hudson, then-president and CEO of BAE Systems, who retired just this past Saturday (Feb. 1), addressed a packed crowd of NVTC members and colleagues at The Ritz-Carlton Tysons Corner. In her keynote speech, which was her last pre-retirement public appearance, she brought attention to the STEM workforce shortage and challenged the audience to engage students from middle school on up. Read our article on the event and the full text of her script here.

One of her most thought-provoking topics was the idea that the academia is “throwing the babies out with the bathwater.” Instead of promoting an inclusive environment, engaging students and recruiting them, academic institutions are still using “weed out” classes to discourage students from continuing in STEM programs. She credited Freeman Hrabowski, president of the University of Maryland Baltimore County, for promoting the idea that we should be working to keep students in the program, not cutting them out. Check out his TED talk on the subject!

Hudson also quoted Malcolm Gladwell, who explains in his most recent book, David and Goliath, why going to an elite school may actually decrease the rate of success for STEM students. According to Gladwell, “Your odds of successfully getting a math degree fall by two percentage points for every ten point increase in the average SAT score of your peers,” meaning the more competitive the school, the less likely a student is to graduate in a STEM field. Hudson and Gladwell attribute the decrease in success to a student’s discouragement when his or her scores aren’t as high as their peers’.

In order to improve the current structure, Hudson called on the audience to understand why students, and specifically minority and female students, embark on a STEM careers less often than their peers.

So, what do you think? Should elite institutions revise their policies? Do STEM students have a better chance at a less prestigious school? How else should the industry be encouraging inclusiveness in STEM education (and the STEM workforce)? Tell is in the comments below.

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