NVTC is inviting members and industry leaders to serve as guest bloggers, sharing insights and information on trends or business issues relevant to other members. Matt Rajput of CohnReznick shares his insights on identifying the right sources for early-stage funding below.


With the economy continuing to recover, a soaring IPO market, strong forecasts for merger and acquisition activity, and abundant funding options and capital availability, middle-market technology companies are positioned to extend 2013’s surge in revenue and profits. Funding sources are plentiful as entities with capital that sat on the sidelines―venture capitalists, private equity firms, and strategic acquirers seeking cutting-edge technology and talented engineers―are vigorously searching for solid investment opportunities.

In its 2014 Middle-Market Technology Industry Outlook, CohnReznick advised: “The U.S. technology merger and acquisition (M&A) market heated up in 2013 and we believe conditions are ripe for the temperature to rise again in 2014. Overall, U.S. M&A activity increased 14% in 2013, making it the strongest year for U.S. deal-making since 2007”.

The highlights for the sector include:

• Telecommunications M&A transactions increased 119% on a global basis to $263.7 billion, led by Verizon’s $130 billion acquisition of the remaining stake in Verizon Wireless

• High technology M&As were up 8% year-over-year

• Information technology comprised almost 50% of all venture-backed M&A deals in 2013 (332 of 673 deals).

Even in the face of a very active M&A marketplace, capital doesn’t fall from the skies for early-stage technology companies.  Great companies typically start with great business ideas.  However, turning those ideas into reality requires capital—sometimes, a sizable amount of capital. Many entrepreneurs dream of landing a huge round of venture capital to meet their funding needs, but in the beginning, that is unlikely to happen for early-stage companies. In fact, according to the National Venture Capital Association, only about 1,000 of the 627,000 new businesses started each year receive venture funding in the U.S.

Fortunately, there are many different financing sources for early-stage technology companies.  But identifying the ideal source(s) of capital can be tricky. Although early-stage companies may view a windfall of venture capital as the grand prize, early-stage companies should explore other sources of capital until venture capital funding is more likely. As companies contemplate various funding options, it is also important to consult with professionals so that peripheral challenges and issues related to funding, such as due diligence and various tax implications, can be appropriately addressed.

In his whitepaper, Early-Stage Company Financing Options – With Alternative Sources Offering Hidden Treasure, Alex Castelli, CohnReznick Partner and Technology Practice Director, shared the following insights that apply to most early-stage technology companies–

  • Unless you are a serial entrepreneur who has had successful exits and provided large returns to your past investors, consider bootstrapping your new venture until you have at least developed a beta version of your product or service.  Being able to show your investors a working product that is in the hands of potential users will help persuade them that you have a business they could invest in.  Put your own money in first before you ask others to invest.  Sweat equity is expected and generally does not take the place of your invested cash.
  • When you fund your business from angel investors or venture capitalists, there is an expectation that you will create a liquidity event for your investors within the next 5 to 7 years, if not sooner.  If you see your business as a “lifestyle” business, outside investment is not advisable unless your investors understand the kind of return and the time period over which they can expect.  With outside investment come heavier expectations about how you will manage and accelerate the growth of your company.
  • Outside investment to grow your company and quickly reach your intended market could be exactly what your company needs.  When talking to investors, consider who will be a good strategic investor – someone with the ability to help you grow your business through their contacts and experience.  Since many investors ask for seats on your Board, you will want to make sure that you have the right mix of insight and experience from those investors.
  • Lastly, always be ready to respond to requests from potential investors.  It is encouraged that those seeking capital be prepared with a sound business plan.  Keep your business plan and projections current and your records organized.  Demonstrating that you are operating a real business with a plan for growth will make your company a more attractive potential investment.

To close, the outlook for the technology industry is positive.  Additionally, solid, middle-market technology companies are likely to be well-received by investors while early-stage companies will find hidden treasure in all of the alternative sources of capital in today’s market.


Matt Rajput, CPA, is an Audit Manager in CohnReznick’s Tysons Corner office. He has more than six years of experience servicing publicly-traded and closely-held companies in a number of industries, including technology, hospitality, and professional services, and he has significant experience providing services to private equity and venture capital backed companies. Contact Matt at matt.rajput@cohnreznick.com.

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Building Relationships: Developing the Relationship

April 22nd, 2014 | Posted by Sarah Jones in Guest Blogs - (Comments Off)

NVTC is inviting members and industry leaders to serve as guest bloggers, sharing insights and information on trends or business issues relevant to other members. In the four of a five part series on “Building Relationships,” Matthew Falls of BusinessUSA shares his insights on maintaining relationships with customers.


You’ve done whatever follow-up resulted from your conversation and it’s time to make the follow up call, or set the meeting. Again, prepare: research beyond the web site, set the agenda and focus beforehand with your contact. This is very important – it moves the conversation forward, lays the stage for the expected action items and demonstrates respect for the other person in that you are prepared for the call and do not intend to waste their time.

Dig deeper – look behind what’s in front of you – talk to multiple people – find out the real story, not just what’s on the web site. Look for ways to bring more value to meetings. Think beyond the meeting to your ultimate goals for this relationship. Focus on the person that you’re speaking with, the action item and how you can help this person.

If you are focusing on the other person and their needs, you can be patient and let the conversation progress naturally. trustSharpen your customer conversation skills. Ask about their interests, what’s important to them. It’s very important to cultivate the human side of relationships to get beyond the standard speech.

You can find out what they are willing to do and capable of doing, by listening to throwaway comments or venting, especially those made in frustration, they exhibit true feelings not stated. Cultivating the human side of relationships develops the trust that makes your contact feel comfortable enough to reveal such information, indicating pain points that your solution can solve.

Your goal is to come away from this first call with points of pain. It’s important to be aware of where you are in the process versus where you want to be and figure out how to advance to next stage – bring in an idea that adds value to them. Each conversation should build on the previous conversation; if you are having the same conversation, they are not ready.

There may not be any apparent points of pain. That’s ok. Keep the conversation going with contacts by looking at them and their business as a whole and send them information, interesting items, bits of news. Become a resource to them. Over time they may introduce you to opportunities, or pain points may be revealed. Your relationships should also give you intelligence about upcoming opportunities.

If you are a federal contractor or sub-contractor, bringing business to the prime obviously will make them see you as a resource and an ideal teaming partner. With contracting trends indicating that 1 of 4 contracts are multiple award vehicles, teaming decisions are often made before the Statement of Work is issued, so developing and expanding teaming relationships become critical to the success of the company.

Many contracts result from being on a team. Not just any team though, the right team. You also want to make your company desirable to the right team. A strategic advisor focused on generating revenue can assess your company, help you determine your core competencies, develop strategies to get on the right team and negotiate a teaming agreement that brings value to all team members.

All of this great research and preparation won’t deliver results if you can’t deliver the message to the customer. Take the time to practice so that you will be more confident in the moment. Anticipate how the call will play out and do some role playing.

Use the seasons analogy to guide the building of your relationships – plant the seed – introduce yourself – nurture the relationship – become a resource to them, send information, make introductions, etc. – harvest the seeds – if you have nurtured the relationship, the harvest time becomes apparent – enjoy the fruits – take the time to enjoy your success – start to think about new opportunities.


Matthew Falls works for the federal initiative BusinessUSA, focusing on outreach to the state and local partners and the business community.  He collaborates with state and local economic development organizations to feature their program content on BusinessUSA and to introduce BusinessUSA as a resource to small businesses. 

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Celebrate the Region’s Best CFOs on June 2, 2014!

April 16th, 2014 | Posted by Sarah Jones in Uncategorized - (Comments Off)

The NVTC CFO Awards is in its 18th year! For those of you who haven’t attended, the event is a great place to recognize and network with great people in the finance industry. The awards take place at The Ritz Carlton-Tysons Corner – see the nominees here. If you’re curious about the look and feel of the event, check out the video below! If you’re interested in celebrating  the continued strength of the region’s technology industry, register here.

 

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NVTC is inviting members and industry leaders to serve as guest bloggers, sharing insights and information on trends or business issues relevant to other members. In the third of a five part series on “Building Relationships,” Matthew Falls of BusinessUSA shares his insights on utilizing your research to connect with potential customers.


You’ve identified the companies, agencies and program offices that are most likely to use your product or service. You have read their most recent press releases and blog entries. You also know the names of the leadership team, program managers and contracting officers for those programs. You’ve connected with them on social media networks. You also know those companies most likely to fit with your core competencies.

If you don’t know this information, you probably have not done enough research and it is best to find out this information. It will provide the basis for starting your matthewseries3relationship with a company, program office, or a prime contractor.

There’s an event next week. Perhaps it’s an Industry Day, a program office is giving a seminar, there’s a networking event sponsored by a trade association or economic development agency, or perhaps you’ve identified a key contact and you want to set up a meeting. Maybe you are attending a trade show or industry event.

Do some research. Who is sponsoring? What programs or panel discussions are being offered? Can you contribute? Call the organization and ask how you can help with the event. Your research on the organization can tell you what programs they like to offer, what its membership does. Think about putting on a program for them in the future. This will better connect you to the organization and they will see you as a resource. Becoming a resource to them gives the organization the confidence to introduce you to an opportunity.

Focus on your goals for this event. Do you want leads, an introduction to someone, or just to build your brand? You’re not going to close a sale, so relax. You can take the time to nurture a relationship. Set performance metrics, i.e., I expect to have x substantial conversations that lead to an opportunity, I expect to collect x business cards, etc. Setting metrics allows you to objectively evaluate your performance and the usefulness of the event. Evaluating each event provides the information needed to make the most of your time, to focus on those events and organizations that provide the most value for you.

The SWOT analysis you did earlier has given you the information and strategic focus needed to craft a statement about your organization, what it does best and why the listener should care. People will want to know what you or your organization does and you need to have a clear vision that ties into your goals for this event.

When you meet that first person, pay attention to them. Look them in the eye, shake hands firmly and show an interest in their business card and what their position is in the organization. Figure out what concerns the person you’re speaking with; have a genuine interest in what they are doing. Ask about recent press releases, new initiatives they may be engaged in, talk about what they hope to get out of this event.

Make the focus on them. Don’t forget the human element of relationships. It is very important to understand what is possible and what the person that you are speaking with is capable of doing; if not, you’re wasting your time. The more you focus on the other person, the faster you will have the information to make a determination about this person.

The other person will ask about your business. Because you spent the time focusing on the other person in this conversation, you now have the information needed to craft your response around how your company’s product or service can be a benefit to the company. Talk about next steps. Leave the conversation with an action item. Write it on the back of their business card when you get a chance. Tell them that you will respond to them the next day.

If you get so lucky as to uncover a potential need and opportunity, try to learn who will influence the solution and the decision-making process. People connect to their colleagues on LinkedIn and some of them will be influential in the requirements development and selection process. Visit each of those buying influence’s LinkedIn profiles and pay close attention to whether they are linked to any of your competitors. If so, then that’s a red flag.

Sometimes there really is no connection to the person; you cannot provide what they need. Ask for a referral, do they know anyone who has a need for your product or service? If so, ask for a specific email introduction to their contact referencing the point of interest as an action item for this conversation. Write the contact’s name and point of interest on the back of the business card.

The event is over and you have a handful of business cards. Hopefully you wrote the action items on the back of the cards. Review the event. How did you perform against your goals? Be objective about the event. Perhaps you didn’t get many cards because you didn’t do the research versus the event not being a good fit for you. Maybe you didn’t get enough cards because you took too much time with a person. That’s good if it leads to a concrete opportunity, or a substantial conversation that moves the relationship forward. Keeping performance metrics allows to objectively evaluate the event, your preparation and your pitch.

Add the cards, points of interest and action items into your contact database and assign tasks for follow up. Always follow up when you say you will. It goes to your credibility, reliability and reputation for being able to deliver. These are some of the most important aspects in a good relationship and to gain the confidence of people who might be able to help you in the future.

At this point you have a few people who are connected to the opportunities that you’ve highlighted in your SWOT analysis. It’s time to cultivate these relationships, bring value to your contacts, assuring that they see you and your company as a valuable resource in their network.

Perhaps you don’t have a business development staff to make these contacts or your company is not located in Washington, DC if you sell to the federal government. Maybe you want to penetrate a different industry sector, line of business or another agency to win larger chunks of business.

Consider forming an advisory board comprised of very high-profile individuals who will open doors and act as advocates for your company. A properly constructed advisory board, whose sole purpose is to drive revenue, can turbo-charge your business development and harvest the value in your company.


Matthew Falls works for the federal initiative BusinessUSA, focusing on outreach to the state and local partners and the business community.  He collaborates with state and local economic development organizations to feature their program content on BusinessUSA and to introduce BusinessUSA as a resource to small businesses. 

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On April 10, the NVTC Business Development, Marketing and Sales Committee held an event entitled “Lead Generation Technology Forum: How to Maximize Your Pipeline.” The event featured a distinguished panel of industry experts and end users, and offered ways to utilize automated marketing and lead generation solutions. John Beveridge, a vice chair of the committee, shares insights from the event below.


The business buying process has changed: a recent study by the Corporate Executive Board found that the average business buyer completes 57 percent of her sales process before ever contacting a salesperson. The NVTC Business Development, Marketing and Sales Committee recently held an event to help business deal with this new business reality.

Marketing executives from Deltek and Sonatype, along with industry representatives from Marketo and Vocus shared their thoughts and experiences on using marketing automation technologies to fill their pipelines and nurture their leads through the customer acquisition process.

The panel shared several insights with the audience:

  • Digital marketing is a process, not a product. Companies starting out with lead generation technology will need to transform their approach. You may need to reconfigure your team’s skills and learn new technologies to successfully implement a digital marketing process.
  • Prior to starting a digital marketing program, it’s important to know who you want to reach and to make sure you have the technology tools to accomplish your mission.
  • Digital, or inbound, marketing is based on the premise of attraction. It matches the modern buying process by providing potential buyers with educational content as they perform pre-purchase research.
  • One of the primary advantages of digital marketing is that it provides intelligence on your lead’s behaviors, which empowers sales people with information to make their outreaches more meaningful to buyers.
  • Digital marketing simplifies the marketing process by automating tasks like email marketing, lead nurturing and lead scoring.
  • Educational content like blogs, whitepapers, eBooks, webinars and videos are the fuel that runs lead generation technology. Companies considering digital marketing need to create high-quality content that educates their audiences and helps move them to a buying decision.
  • Digital marketing software lets companies measure every element of their lead generation process and optimize their process based on marketplace feedback.

Interesting in learning more about lead generation technology and other business development issues? Become a member of the NVTC Business Development, Marketing and Sales Committee.

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Building Relationships: Doing the Research

April 8th, 2014 | Posted by Sarah Jones in Uncategorized - (Comments Off)

NVTC is inviting members and industry leaders to serve as guest bloggers, sharing insights and information on trends or business issues relevant to other members. In the second of a five part series on “Building Relationships,” Matthew Falls of BusinessUSA shares his insights on using the web to research those companies that offer the best opportunities for you.


Your SWOT analysis has given you valuable information about your company, its products and services and where its opportunities may lie. Now, use the web to research blog2those companies that offer the best opportunities for you. This should give you a list of companies and organizations that offer the most promise – those that are most likely to use your product or service.

Seek to answer the following questions about your target companies and prospects. You may need to rework and modify your behavior as you gain answers to these questions and you uncover more information through the preparation process.

  • Where is the prospect in their decision-making process?
  • Where are you in your selling process?
  • What are your objectives for your call?
  • What information, support, or decisions do you need to achieve your objectives?

Research the companies carefully. Better early research = higher conversion rate. Go beyond the web site and look for information from other sources. Google the company’s name and click on a few links to see what’s going on. Have there been any noteworthy, positive or negative, events? Google the phrases “<company name> problems” and “<company name> strategy”.

If you want to be successful selling to sophisticated prospects, develop expertise in the buyer’s industry. Staying current on industry trends should be a continuous process. Google the following topics:

  • “Recent challenges in the <insert potential customer’s industry> industry”
  • “Top challenges facing <enter contact’s role>”
  • “New trends facing <enter contact’s role> in the < insert potential customer’s industry> industry”
  • “<insert target industry> industry associations”
  • “<insert target industry> industry study”
  • “<McKinsey, Booz-Allen…> target industry report”

Use this information to show potential customers that you are interested in solving challenges, are informed about them and you know what’s going on in the customer’s industry.

Find out what’s going on in your target companies. Whenever you can tie your capabilities to a company’s strategic initiatives, you stand a better chance of getting a response. Focus your preparation on creating relevance.

Read their press releases and blogs and what other bloggers are saying about the company. Ask associates about the organization. Look at the products, programs and services that the company offers and where the money is being spent.

Financial and budget information about privately-held companies is difficult to find. Search news articles and social media sites. There could be valuable information there. Publically held companies do not publish budgets, but review their quarterly 10k filings to get an idea of where they spend their money. You can find links to this information in the investor relations section of their web site. Watch recordings of recent CEO’s analyst presentations. If the company is private equity owned, visit the private equity firm’s website to learn about their investment strategy and philosophy. Identify the principal at the private equity firm responsible for your target company.

Budgets for public organizations are published on their web sites. Their budgets and the new spending programs will tell you their priorities and their most important initiatives as of late.

In the About Us web page, companies will list the officers of the company or the senior leadership team. Public agencies and non-profits will often publish an organization chart listing program offices and sometimes the personnel in charge of these offices. Research the leadership and search the web for new stories about them.

Don’t forget the human side of relationships. It is always better to relate to your customer or prospect on a personal level. We live in a world of information overload, spam email, and automated messaging. Mass messaging falls on deaf ears, so craft your message to appeal to your prospect’s needs. You can find information on your customer’s needs by:

  • Link to your customer or prospect on LinkedIn and follow them if they are active on Twitter
  • Google “<contact’s name, title and company>”, and pay attention not only to what is happening in their business life but also their personal life
  • See if the buyer has spoken on YouTube or shared presentations on the Web
  • See if the buyer is active in associations or has presented at conferences
  • See if you have any mutual connections on LinkedIn, and reach out to any connections you believe would be willing to share insight to help you understand the buyer better

Search the web for news stories, articles, white papers and press releases. This will again give you an idea of the most relevant issues facing your prospect and their organization. This information also provides discussion topics for your initial phone call. Together, they may indicate pain points that the organization is facing.

Large businesses will often have a schedule of events where a senior person for the company might be speaking, serving on a panel, exhibiting at a trade show or conducting a seminar. Attend these events, or find out who the sponsor is and volunteer to help organize the event. Find opportunities like this that give you a more relaxed setting to make contact and start the relationship.

A way to smaller business might be through a chamber of commerce, business associations or state associations of like businesses, such as manufacturers or contractors. Look for those associations that match your company’s capabilities. Members of these organizations are more likely to be established businesses that have the ability to purchase your products.

Get involved with your local Procurement Technical Assistance Center (PTAC), SBA Small Business Development Center (SBDC), Minority or Native American Business Center (MBC or NABC) and regional economic development organizations. These organizations are advocates for small business. They offer low or no cost seminars and services and will know of local small business incentives. They sometimes hold matchmaking and procurement events. Their counselors are also a great source of introductions to small business offices of large businesses and federal program managers.

For federal government contractors, the Offices of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization are small business advocates. All federal agencies have an office like this and their mission is to connect small businesses with federal contracts. Here is a link to all the small business contracting offices-http://osdbu.gov/members.html . Click on the office you want and contact information loads.

The Offices of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization are a great resource to learn of procurement events, upcoming bid opportunities, to find out the names of program managers that may have a need for your services, or potential teaming partners for an opportunity.

Develop relationships with the Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization for each Federal agency that you have targeted. Be active with them, stay in touch, talk about your credentials and capabilities to them; you want them to know your company and your name.

Your web research will also tell you the names of the top 10, 25, or 50 prime contractors with the agency. All of these companies have offices of Small Business Contracting. Their job is to match small businesses to teaming opportunities with the company. Get to know them, attend their events; find out the trade organizations to which they belong. Talk to them about upcoming opportunities. Develop relationships with them, become a resource, talk about your credentials and capabilities with them; you want them to know your company and your name.

Look here for acquisition forecasts from those agencies you have targeted. Look at past awards and upcoming re-competes. These will all indicate the direction and priorities of the agency and any specific opportunities that may be released. Agencies will often hold Industry Days that focus on a particular opportunity. These events offer an opportunity to get to know others in this space – prime contractors, program managers and the Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization.

There are also private sector paid sources of business intelligence regarding your targeted companies, agencies and program offices. Evaluate these carefully. Are you getting information only, someone else’s analysis, introductions for your business, or someone who will not only introduce you, but become an advocate for your company?

Make certain you have exhausted and used all of the free resources out there before paying a subscription. You can do this yourself. Contact me, I’ll show you how. Oftentimes, such services are a collection of publically available information from the sources I’ve listed above. It is my belief that you can obtain this kind of information from targeted research. At that point, you will be in position to determine how best to use the information going forward.


Matthew Falls works for the federal initiative BusinessUSA, focusing on outreach to the state and local partners and the business community.  He collaborates with state and local economic development organizations to feature their program content on BusinessUSA and to introduce BusinessUSA as a resource to small businesses. 

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NVTC is inviting members and industry leaders to serve as guest bloggers, sharing insights and information on trends or business issues relevant to other members. In the first of a five part series on “Building Relationships,” Matthew Falls of BusinessUSA shares his insights on the small, but crucial steps you need to take to build valuable relationships. The weekly blog series will help you build the relationships that create revenue for your company.


Finding your customer starts with an examination of your business, product or service. What do I have to offer my customer? What customers are most likely to use my product or service? matthewseries

Begin the process of discovering your company’s core competencies by asking yourself some general questions to start your thinking process…

  • Revenue, number employees, core competencies?
  • What specific organizations or companies have a need for your product?
  • Where do you have past performance?
  • What skills sets do you wish to market?
  • What do you think it takes to build your brand?
  • How much time?
  • What kinds of resources and how much do you plan to allocate to this?
  • How do you feel about strategic acquisitions?

I would suggest that the next step is to conduct an objective, detailed analysis of the company or product from the standpoint of its strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. (SWOT analysis) Such an analysis is useful when it is done as a team exercise and can also be useful as an individual exercise when looking at a smaller space, such as managing a territory. In either case, it is important to look objectively and avoid the use of general statements.

Strengths are the advantages that the company has proven. They may be a focused management team, a strong supply chain, an established product or service in the market.

Weaknesses are internal challenges that need management attention and better resourcing in order to turn them into strengths. Weaknesses may be inadequate capital, the lack of a brand in the market, or very few use cases for the product.

Companies face a wide range of opportunities and at the same time; they need to concentrate their efforts where they have an advantage due to a particular strength. Think of opportunities as the possibilities for the company. They can come from a well-established need in the market, changes in technology and markets, government policy, social patterns, population profiles, lifestyle changes, etc. They also come from an established market demand.

Like opportunities, threats are external to the company, disruptive factors that must be considered when planning for strategic growth. Changes in technology and markets, government policy, social patterns, population profiles, lifestyle changes, etc. can be opportunities for one company but may be threats for another.

A SWOT analysis can provide the information and insight to pinpoint your company’s product or service’s strengths, match them with opportunities, determine how to convert your weaknesses into strengths, while mitigating threats. SWOT allows you to focus on what is doable and attainable, identifying markets and opportunities that your company can exploit.

It is important to know how to bring your company’s capabilities together to formulate solutions to potential challenges or opportunities. You also need to know the limitations of your capabilities so you don’t promise the customer something you cannot deliver.

Visit your website and read how your company is positioning the solutions that you think will be relevant to the target customer

  • How does your solution address the issues that you want to discuss?
  • What objections do you anticipate and how can you proactively resolve them?
  • How do different products and services you offer link together into a comprehensive solution?
  • What additional internal resources should you consider lining up to support your pursuit?

Think about customer challenges and industry issues. You might be about to engage in a conversation that could go beyond your knowledge of product applications and industry expertise. Do the necessary research to add value to the conversation and build your credibility.

  • Talk to your internal subject matter experts
  • Google “research on <issue of interest>”
  • Google “McKinsey, Booz-Allen… report on <issue of interest>”
  • Be prepared with potential solutions to industry issues and challenges that you discover.

There are times when an unbiased assessment of your company can be quite helpful. A strategic advisor that is expert in revenue generation can help you see the possibilities and act as an ‘honest broker’ in all engagements. Their objective is to identify and present strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats without bias towards one side or another, allowing all to sit on the same side of the table. The value of reduced internal friction during stressful times cannot be overestimated.

The most valuable result of researching your company and conducting the SWOT analysis is that you now have a clear plan to focus your efforts. By examining your organization to identify its value proposition, you’ve identified your company’s core competencies: those things they do better than anyone else and also those markets that offer the most potential.


 Matthew Falls works for the federal initiative BusinessUSA, focusing on outreach to the state and local partners and the business community.  He collaborates with state and local economic development organizations to feature their program content on BusinessUSA and to introduce BusinessUSA as a resource to small businesses. 

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