NVTC is inviting members and industry leaders to serve as guest bloggers, sharing insights and information on trends or business issues relevant to other members. This week, David K. Shepherd of LMI shares six strategies for reducing loss from data breaches. Check out previous blogs from LMI on a business-driven approach to IT decision-making and three business-friendly strategies to increase the value of enterprise architecture.


David Shepherd

David Shepherd, senior consultant and member of the Systems Development Group at LMI.

It’s no secret that data breaches are on the rise. These security rifts cost U.S. organizations an average of $195 per protected personal data record lost or stolen, with total costs averaging more than $5.8 million per organization breached. What may be surprising is that well-intentioned employees could be putting your data at risk..

How? To meet deadlines and collaboration requirements, employees skirt security rules protecting confidential documents by using personal email addresses and free file sharing services. Focused on completing tasks, they are unaware of the risks.

MeriTalk research shows that nearly 50 percent of federal agency security breaches are caused by security noncompliance. Forrester data reveals that the top reason for breaches (36 percent of companies surveyed) is inadvertent use of data without clear knowledge of polices. The problem is exacerbated by the proliferation of mobile devices that connect to cellular and Wi-Fi networks and upload data to the cloud.

Why do users bypass security? They take these risks to complete tasks within tight deadlines. They recognize this isn’t the “right” way to share documents, but feel they have no other options. Common complaints:

“Due to mail server size limitations, I cannot send a large file to my client.”

“Neither my client nor my company has a file-sharing tool.”

Balancing data protection and productivity

Increasing the number of security rules will not decrease employee data losses. The following six recommendations can help organizations balance the need for data protection, policy clarity, and productivity.

1) Understand employee needs when setting security policies

Engage users so you understand their day-to-day work and why they bypass security. Anonymous surveys and best practice initiatives are helpful tools. Consider granting amnesty to ensure you fully understand the problem. If your employees are using Dropbox, Box, or Google Docs, they are saying they need better storage and collaboration tools.

2) Conduct consistent, regular staff training at all levels

PricewaterhouseCoopers research reveals that most businesses invest only up to $400 per employee per year on cybersecurity training. The big exception is financial institutions, which typically spend $2,500 per employee each year. Employee training must be ongoing and pervasive—not an annual ritual. It must also include executives who are more likely to have data on multiple devices.

3) Provide a secure, flexible, and easy-to-use file-sharing tool

Employees started using cloud storage because providers offered free services with easy-to-use interfaces. These companies also offer enterprise versions, which include customizable interfaces, meet government security standards, and may even be branded with your organizational identity. Nearly all providers offer trials.

4) Deal with mobility

Organizations need to update mobile device policies to address both organization- and employee-owned devices. Solutions need to protect organization data while meeting security and employee usability needs.

5) Invest in effective prevention

Be proactive. Prior to a damaging event, security budgets are slim. After a breach, organizations can’t spend money fast enough. An event’s root cause is often due to problems with an organization’s processes. Hastily spending money on new tools won’t necessarily fix the root cause.

6) Consider suggesting tools, even if you can’t endorse their use

If an organization can’t provide a file-sharing tool, consider suggesting employees use a particular service. Wouldn’t it be better to monitor a single service closely, rather than attempting to monitor them all? If a bad breach occurs, the organization could immediately inform users and take corrective actions.

Our pristine networks are vulnerable to dedicated employees who are trying to do great work and meet impossible deadlines. If we don’t provide secure, capable tools, they will find another way. We can continue to fight against them, or we can investigate their needs, accept the challenges, and work to meet those needs while still ensuring security.


David K. Shepherd is a senior consultant in LMI’s Systems Development Group and has 25 years of experience as an information technology (IT) service management and security professional. He has designed, developed, managed, and maintained enterprise quality websites and applications for federal clients. He also advises clients on IT infrastructure issues, effective use of tools and techniques, and security engineering. He can be reached at dshepherd@lmi.org.

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Heart Smart Leaders Energize Their Workforces

October 28th, 2014 | Posted by Sarah Jones in Uncategorized - (Comments Off)

NVTC is inviting members and industry leaders to serve as guest bloggers, sharing insights and information on trends or business issues relevant to other members. This week, Board member Marta Wilson of Transformation Systems Inc. explains the connection between the heart and successful business leaders. Check out Marta’s previous blog series on Engaging Your Total Enterprise here, here and here.


As a leader, it’s important to know the connection between the heart and the brain. Most people think of communication in terms of signals expressed through language, voice, gestures, expressions, and movements. However, evidence suggests that a subtle electromagnetic or energetic communication system operates just below our conscious awareness. Energetic interactions contribute to the attractions or repulsions that occur between individuals and also affect social exchanges and relationships.

Experiments conducted at the Institute of HeartMath indicate that the heart’s electromagnetic field can transmit information between people. They’ve measured an exchange of heart energy between individuals at a conversational distance and found that one person’s brain waves can synchronize to another person’s heart. Furthermore, when an individual is generating a coherent heart rhythm, synchronization between that person’s brain waves and another person’s heartbeat is more likely to occur. These findings suggest that individuals are aware of the information in the heart fields of those around them. This has implications for leadership.

Effective leadership not only requires intelligence and logic, but also it requires making a heart connection with people. Great leaders are role models for honesty, empathy, communication, appreciation, and collaboration. They create a supportive environment, maintain confidentiality, and focus on the wellbeing of others. They communicate impeccably, manage their agreements, and hold a positive attitude for learning from their colleagues and associates. Perhaps most importantly, they continuously monitor their interactions with people in order to deepen and strengthen their relationships with everybody in their sphere of influence. In other words, great leaders are heart smart.

Heart smart leaders relate to the minds and to the hearts of their people who, in turn, make their best contributions because they’re more than just employed – they’re also inspired and fully engaged. When heart connections become stronger throughout the workplace, issues and conditions related to the human element can be more easily resolved and improved. For this to happen, change must happen in the heart as well as in habits, or old habits will slip back into place when the pressure is high and when a better way of working together is most important.

Stewards of every enterprise can lead from the heart. It’s our choice to tap into ourselves and act in ways that energize and motivate our people. Doing so will be positively empowering as well as potentially transformative for us as leaders and for our organizations. Even when we as leaders face daunting and unpredictable conditions, we are the force to lift ourselves, our people, and our organizations to higher levels of possibility and performance.  As Nelson Mandela so wisely stated, “A good head and a good heart are always a formidable combination.”

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Last week, the Center for Innovative Technology (CIT), released the Commonwealth Research and Commercialization Fund’s annual report for FY2014. The CRCF accelerates entrance of new products and services to the market, incentivizes collaboration between institutions of higher education and companies engaged in research in high-growth, emerging industries and provides new resources to attract and retain eminent researchers at Virginia universities.

The FY2014 annual report indicates that CIT issued 52 CRCF awards to startups, universities and research institutes engaged in research and development projects, leveraging the Commonwealth’s $4.8 million investment with approximately $7.4 million in matching funds. Here are some highlights from the report:

  • 50 New Patents: CRCF investments supported more than 50 filed or pending patents, including both full and provisional patents; 12 or more patents have been issued; more than ten invention disclosures have been issued; five or more products or technologies have been licensed; and other discussions have circulated around trademarks and trade secrets.
  • 2 New Products/Services: In FY2014, at least two new life sciences and modeling and simulation products and/or services were brought to market through CRCF investments; at least one additional product/service is anticipated for near-term release. In addition, more than 12 organizations are actively engaged in discussions with companies and other organizations interested in licensing products.
  • 4 New Companies Formed: At least four new life science and cybersecurity companies, some of which are university spin-outs, were created. Additionally, at least one CRCF recipient expanded its operations across the state, and at least two non-Virginia companies located all or a portion of their operations to the Commonwealth.
  • $30 Million in Additional Investments: CRCF award recipients reported nearly $30 million in additional investments made in research and technology work after the conclusion of the CRCF projects. At least seven companies have noted sales and/or revenue, with reported totals of more than $3 million, combined.
  • New Partnerships: Several notable partnerships have been formed between CRCF recipients and other organizations, including: Reliant Medical Group, EMC, Amgen, Dominion Virginia Power, Bracco and Northrop Grumman, as well as with colleges, universities, large pharmaceutical companies and startups in and outside of Virginia.

Funding for the Commonwealth Research and Commercialization Fund has been one of NVTC’s top policy and budget priorities in recent years. Unfortunately, Virginia’s current budget shortfall has reduced CRCF funding to $2.8 million in annual funding in FY15 and FY16.

NVTC will be advocating for increased funding during the upcoming legislative session in Richmond. Click here to learn more.

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Contribute to the NVTC Blog!

October 22nd, 2014 | Posted by Allison Gilmore in About NVTC | Member Blog Posts | Social Media - (Comments Off)

NVTC welcomes member submissions for guest blog posts. There is no suggested word count and posts do NOT need to be original content (i.e. they can be excerpted or summarized from other authored material coming out of your company). Guest blog posts should offer information and thought leadership, and must NOT be promotional.

The best blog posts incorporate lists, graphics and/or photos, and include links to supplemental information and a concise headline. Check out this example. (Note: This post plugs a product, but only because the product is the source of the information the blog author is providing us.)

With limited editorial space (usually one or two guest posts a week), we urge you to reach out to us with your proposed submission in advance (especially if it’s time sensitive or needs to be coordinated with an event). NVTC’s editorial staff will select an appropriate date for publication of each guest post, and reserves the right to make suggestions for edits to a post before publication.

To share your insights with NVTC’s readers, contact Sarah Jones at sjones@nvtc.org or 703-268-7878 ext. 207.

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NVTC is inviting members and industry experts to serve as guest bloggers, sharing insights and information on trends or business issues relevant to other members. This week, Norm Snyder of member company Aronson LLC shares how a variety of resources, including incubators, accelerators, co-working spaces, etc., can greatly influence entrepreneurial endeavors.


The DC Metro area has seen an explosion of entrepreneurial startup activity over the last several years. A variety of resources, including incubators, accelerators, co-working spaces, etc. seek to help startups succeed. Entrepreneurs face a myriad of options when it comes to incubators and accelerators. How are they similar? How are they different? Most provide space, mentorship and training, and some provide capital. Some focus on specific industry verticals, while others are broad in scope. They can be run by nonprofits or by big corporations, and arrangements can last for a fixed short term or many years. What are the pros and cons of doing either or none? What’s an entrepreneur to do with so many options?

Recently, I led a panel discussion for the NVTC Entrepreneur Center to explore this. Panelists included Evan Burfield, co-founder of 1776; Fletcher Jones, managing director of AOL Fishbowl Labs; Dan Wooley, general partner of Mach37; Rachael Stott, director of Refraction and Juan Pablo Segura, founder of 1EQ.

While definitions vary, the distinctions aren’t always clear cut. Incubators typically provide entrepreneurs co-working space, collaboration opportunities with other startups, workshops, casual mentoring, networking, etc. A startup could be involved in an incubator for several years. Co-working is an “incubator light” option that typically doesn’t offer much in the way of mentoring and workshops. Accelerators typically work with startups that are a little farther along and often provide an intensive 3 to 4 month full time immersion designed to accelerate the growth of a startup enterprise with a very structured program of mentoring, curriculum, etc. Accelerators will often provide some seed capital, say $25,000 to $50,000, in exchange for a small amount of equity. While each option generally involves an application and vetting process, selection into an incubator is normally more grueling and competitive.

To get a sense of the variety, consider our panel of local organizations. 1776 is an incubator and global hub for startups tackling major challenges in education, energy, healthcare, government and other critical industries. 1776 offers a wide variety of mentoring, training, networking, etc. and also provides co-working space. AOL Fishbowl Labs provides corporate linked (AOL) co-working space with informal opportunities for mentoring, collaboration and networking. Mach37, a subsidiary of state funded CIT, is a cybersecurity accelerator with a 13 week full time program with a structured curriculum focused on the validation of product ideas and the development of relationships that produce an initial customer base and investment capital. Mach37 does provide some capital in exchange for a small equity interest. Refraction, linked to Reston based startup Canvas, is a co-working experiment focused on making collaboration an art and a science; simple, repeatable, scalable and fun. 1EQ is a health IT startup that participates in a non-traditional accelerator, StartUp Health, and in an incubator, 1776.

Clearly, one size does not fit all in the incubator/accelerator world and every startup does not need to be a part of an incubator or accelerator to succeed. A corollary is that participating in an incubator or accelerator does not guarantee success. So what are some of the questions an entrepreneur should ask to consider which option, if any, might be a good fit for a particular startup?

  • What mentoring is offered? Are the mentors experienced in what you are trying to do and provide networks that will help you succeed?
  • What training and workshops are offered? How structured is the curriculum? Does the curriculum address my needs?
  • If the option involves co-working space, is the location beneficial to your startup?
  • Are any industry verticals emphasized and if so do they align well with what you are trying to do?
  • Does the option provide any capital? Does the option require you to give up some equity?
  • What benefits can you expect to receive?
  • What are your obligations including time, money, etc. for you to receive the benefits you hope to receive? Can you meet the obligations?
  • Are there any unique benefits with this option?
  • How many startups have worked or are working with this option? How does this option measure and describe its success?
  • Can you speak with some alumni companies, both successful and otherwise? Prepare in advance what you want to ask them.

Entrepreneurs have a number of options to consider for their startup. Be careful to do your homework and do what gives you the best chance to succeed.

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6 Things You Didn’t Know About NVTC’s Techtopia Map

October 15th, 2014 | Posted by Sarah Jones in Membership - (Comments Off)

Did you know that the NVTC Techtopia Map is 15 years old in 2014? What started out as a cool idea to “brand” Northern Virginia as a growing technology corridor back in the Y2K days has become a great way to look back at how our region – and our membership – has evolved over the years.

techtopia2014_flat_back_w_logos_BAH_CHANGED

Six things you didn’t know about NVTC’s Techtopia Map:

  1. Member companies AHT Insurance, Leap Frog Solutions and Lee Technologies (now Schneider Electric) have been on EVERY edition of the map! Now that’s staying power!
  2. For Techtopia’s fifth anniversary, we printed the map on a t-shirt that was distributed to attendees at the NVTC Banquet. That banquet was at the “brand new” Udvar-Hazy Center (The companion facility to the Smithonian’s Air and Space Museum in D.C.), and NVTC was the first outside group to hold an event there. Any long-time members still have one of those t-shirts?
  3. Another year, we printed an ADC Map that had Techtopia on the cover. Anyone still have one in your office or car?
  4. For several years, the map appeared on Metrobuses and in select Metro stations as part of a partnership with WMATA. Do you remember seeing those?
  5. The Library of Congress has a copy of every Techtopia Map on file.
  6. We added an online version of the map a couple of years down the road, and that was soon followed by the brochure version that you see in our membership kits and on the NVTC display table at events, and a calendar version, which we used to promote the Equal Footing Foundation for several years.

Would you like to be a part of Techtopia history yourself? There’s still time for your company to be included on the map in 2015. Contact Michelle Senglaub at msenglaub@nvtc.org for more information and pricing.

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NVTC is inviting members and industry experts to serve as guest bloggers, sharing insights and information on trends or business issues relevant to other members. This week, Elizabeth Harr of member company Hinge shares how individuals with expertise and influence draw in others to want to work with them and their firms.


Stars: they’re big, they’re bright, and their gravitational pull is impossible to ignore. The same is true for industry stars in the technology space. Individuals with expertise and influence draw in others to want to work with them and their firms. Consider Visible ExpertsSM — industry innovators and thought leaders, business gurus that shape their professional field with their influence and insight. These superstars are lead-generating machines.

New research reveals how Visible Experts become known – and how their expertise generates leads for their technology firms for which they work. Hinge interviewed 1,030 professional services firms and 130 Visible Experts to find out just how these industry stars accelerate growth for their firms.

But first, let’s look at exactly how a Visible Expert is defined. Like stars, Visible Experts come in different types and sizes. The research breaks them out into 5 distinct levels:

  1. Resident Expert. Expertise comes before stardom. Work hard within your firm to distinguish yourself as the go-to guy or gal in your area.
  2. Local Hero. You’re branching out, innovating and creating the content that will ignite your stardom.
  3. Rising Star. Your expertise is becoming evident in your industry. You’re making ripples and your firm begins reaping some solid rewards.
  4. Industry Rock Star. Your expertise is well known in your industry. Your content—books, blogs, articles—are must-haves and are considered indispensible in the business world.
  5. Global Superstar. You command big audiences and higher rates for your services. You’re a leader in your industry and you’re even known outside of it. To be connected to you is a privilege and you’ve got your pick of potential partners and clients.

Each category comes with different challenges and benefits. But not all leads will drift uninvited into your network, especially if you’re still making your way to Visible Expert status. Here are five ways that Visible Experts encourage leads, grow their own reputations and that of their firms:

  • Creating content. With the exception of reality TV stars, no one is known for nothing. Producing content shows who you are, what you know, and what you can do for your clients.
  • Speaking engagements. The only thing better than quality content is presenting that content in person. Get seen, get heard, and get noticed. Speaking engagements let you present your insights in person, answer questions, and get to know your prospects’ issues better. Clients want to connect with Visible Experts for exactly this reason—that you’re a person who can help them understand complex ideas. And as you continue higher on the Visible Expert path, you gain more benefits from these engagements.visible1
  • Networking. As with speaking engagements, networking events reveal the person behind the content. An active networking presence illustrates your generosity and a deep commitment to your field of expertise.
  • Search engine marketing. SEO is crucial to visibility. You might be the preeminent expert in your industry, but clients outside your field might not know that. Make sure you show up in their search results. SEO optimized content drives those curious prospects to your ideas and your website.visible2
  • Focusing on target markets. Visible Experts reach stardom faster and easier by zeroing in on specific audiences and markets. Research the clients that your ideas, innovations, and services will benefit the most and target them. This kind of focus will yield before ROI and help you grow your reputation and your firm faster.

So lead generation gets easier as you climb the Visible Expert ladder—even better, it gets easier to close new business. This, along with the ability to charge higher hourly rates, increases revenue and helps your entire firm grow.


Elizabeth Harr is a partner at Hinge, a marketing and branding firm for professional services. Elizabeth is an accomplished entrepreneur and experienced executive with a background in strategic planning, brand building, and communications. She is the coauthor of The Visible Expert, Inside the Buyer’s Brain, How Buyers Buy: Technology Services Edition and Online Marketing for Professional Services: Technology Services Edition.

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As a benefit of NVTC membership, all NVTC member companies get the following veteran recruiting tools for FREE through the NVTC Veterans Employment Initiative:

  • Job Ad Postings – Post an unlimited number of job ad postings on www.novatechvets.org. Jobs can be posted individually or scraped from your existing job board. NVTC members’ job postings will reach an expanded audience through U.S. Tech Vets, the online community we launched in January 2014 with Monster, the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) and 10 other national technology associations, since jobs posted to www.novatechvets.org site are cross-posted on U.S. TePicture1ch Vets.
  • Veteran Resumes – Search the nation’s largest veteran resume database of more than 970,000 resumes.  NoVaTechVets provides employers access to nearly twice as many resumes in its veteran resume database than available through other veteran job boards.
  • Better Site Functionality NoVaTechVets leverages Monster Power Resume Search technology, a unique, award winning technology that enables recruiters find the right candidate with the right skills faster than traditional keyword search tools found in most veteran job board.  This can cut the time to find the right candidate by as much as 40% over other job search tools.
  • Resources and Training – With NoVaTechVets, recruiters can participate in monthly training through live web conference where they can hone their online search skills. Upcoming training webinars are scheduled for Oct. 16, Nov. 20 and Dec. 11 at 1:30 p.m. Eastern. (Email veterans@nvtc.org to recieve dial in information.) NoVaTechVets also provides free access to recruiter research library containing helpful instructional videos and other information.

An NVTC member buying unlimited veteran job postings and a single nationwide veteran resume search license from one of the top five veteran job boards could expect to pay between $8,000 and $18,000 depending on features.

Note: This price range includes just one recruiter resume search license. With NoVaTechVets, your company can have multiple recruiter accounts/veteran resume search licenses. For many NVTC members, especially for small and medium sized businesses, the money you can save in veteran recruiting expenses equals more than your annual member dues.

Don’t wait to take advantage of this valuable NVTC member benefit! Sign up for a recruiter account today!

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A Business-First Approach to Investing in IT

October 7th, 2014 | Posted by Sarah Jones in Uncategorized - (Comments Off)

NVTC is inviting members to serve as guest bloggers, sharing insights and information on trends or business issues relevant to other members. Kathryn Palmer of member company LMI shares a business-driven approach to IT decision-making.


Tight budgets have increased pressure on information technology (IT) departments to justify spending. When an executive asks: “Our IT is too complex – what can we do to reduce redundancy and our overall IT budget?” Are you able to answer?

Do you know what an application costs? How an application supports your business? What infrastructure resources it consumes? Do you have the data you need to support business capabilities, invest in innovation, and quickly make targeted cuts?

A business architecture is a powerful tool that enables a business-driven approach to IT decision-making. It defines the business, the processes that support the business, and the technologies needed to enable the processes.

By linking IT investments to strategic goals, business architecture enables organizations to spend money wisely, while prioritizing new investments and protecting mission-critical systems. Business architecture will help you:

  • Validate IT requirements
  • Select solutions that add the most value
  • Eliminate processes and systems that contribute little value
  • Design new systems that provide a more efficient match of business function and IT resources

The following three steps will help you use business architecture to align IT with business goals, even as your business changes over time.

1. Involve business leaders

Effectively managing IT resources simply isn’t just a problem for the IT department. Business strategy and operations must inform IT investments. Top business decision-makers not only need to learn why business architecture is important, they need to help shape it.

IT managers should involve business leaders early to learn about their long-term goals, business requirements, and operational nuances. To facilitate collaboration between business and IT managers, remember to hold IT managers accountable to:

  • Understand business goals and needs, and communicate technical complexities in easy-to-understand business terms
  • Show business leaders how business architecture is used to improve performance and eliminate redundancies
  • Encourage high-level decision makers to communicate the value of business architecture and the role it plays in advancing organizational goals

2. Start with a single core business area

When you develop your business architecture, start with a single core business function. An obvious choice is the part of your business that is being impacted by a business problem that, if solved, will yield significant benefits.

This approach avoids the pitfalls of completing a comprehensive—broad and deep—inventory that is analyzed in excruciating detail. Such approaches usually fail because of “analysis paralysis,” in which the usefulness of the architecture is lost in the details.

It also mitigates two other roadblocks: the time it takes to see results and the resources the effort consumes from the business unit. Focusing on one business function costs less as it requires input from fewer business and IT experts.

3. Integrate business architecture into yearly planning

For long-term success, it’s essential that development of business architectures be part of yearly planning. Building business architecture is iterative. Each new core process analysis adds to the organization’s understanding of the functional components of new systems and opportunities to utilize IT resources more efficiently across the organization. Communicating the status of the business architecture is key to the planning process. As you complete the development of a business function, remember to measure and discuss the outcomes from the effort.


Kathryn Palmer is a member of LMI’s Information Management group, which provides strategic advice and program management support to government agencies implementing enterprise-wide systems. Specializing in enterprise architecture (EA), Ms. Palmer brings consulting expertise in enhancing business performance to various federal civil agencies, including organizational restructuring, business process reengineering (BPR), operational effectiveness, and governance. Ms. Palmer earned a BS in accounting and information systems from Virginia Tech and currently is working on an MS in data analytics engineering from George Mason University to apply data-driven approaches to EA.

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