Who Owns the Data?

March 22nd, 2016 | Posted by Sarah Jones in Guest Blogs | Member Blog Posts - (Comments Off)

The greatest meaning of “big” in Big Data is the role of data in the digital economy. The question who owns the data is big too. With IoT and cloud, data ownership will matter soon even to those who don’t care now. Svetlana Sicular of the Gartner Blog Network explores this issue in this week’s blog post. 


The greatest meaning of “big” in Big Data is the role of data in the digital economy. The question who owns the data is big too. With IoT and cloud, data ownership will matter soon even to those who don’t care now.

And there is no universal answer — data ownership is culture-specific. In some cases, nobody wants to own the data, in other cases, everybody wants to grab a piece (“it’s mine!” although the “owner” didn’t even know before you asked that this data existed). With participating external parties, things are even more complicated: for example, one party might learn that it does not have rights for the data it considered its own.  To solve ownership — but not alleviate the problem! — some organizations decide that data belongs to their customers, citizens or third-parties, and the company is only a custodian.

What successful approaches to data ownership have I seen?

The universal first step is establishing an institute of data governance.  I just published a research note on how to do this: EIM 1.0: Setting Up Enterprise Information Management and Governance. You don’t have to call it “data governance.” It could be “data advocacy” or simply a name reflecting the nature of taking care of data. It should resonate with a specific organizational or ecosystem culture.

The next steps would be specific to the culture and the nature of the business: figuring out what data is most vital. This will narrow down data ownership to the decisions that matter (which will save a lot of grief and lots of hours).

The versions of data ownership I have seen:

  • Information governance mechanism resolves it through top-down decision making.
  • Subject matter experts make a step forward to own the data on which they are SMEs (bottom up).
  • Application business owners are offered to own the data, accept it and take it (unexpectedly) seriously, which is fruitful to everyone.
  • Data operators become de-facto data owners (which could be a solution, but could be a greater problem). Transparency in what is being done with data and explicit data access rules make it a solution.
  • When data ownership is hard to resolve on the high level, going more granular, and resolving data elements’ ownership (which is usually more obvious), answers the question.
  • A business executives assumes data ownership. The worst case is when such ownership belongs to an executive who has control, but has no idea about data. E.g. the executive owns the data, but does nothing because executives are busy doing other things. The best case is when this executive is a sponsor of data-related work.

The ownership is just part of taking care of the data. Look at the root of the issue: who can do what with which data without stepping on each other’s toes, avoid troubles with regulations and ensure you put data to work ethically. Data governance often starts with compliance and ownership, but — unavoidably — it ends up finding value in the data, which is big in the digital economy.

Follow Svetlana on Twitter @Sve_Sic. For more on Big Data, check out NVTC’s Big Data and Analytics Committee.  The NVTC committee is hosting its first conference on May 5 which will explore health care informatics and analytics.

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Overcoming Obstacles in Entrepreneurship

March 14th, 2016 | Posted by Sarah Jones in Guest Blogs | Member Blog Posts - (Comments Off)

This week on NVTC’s blog: on Feb. 18, the NVTC Small Business and Entrepreneur Committee sponsored a fireside chat entitled “Journey to Success: Overcoming Obstacles in Entrepreneurship.” Nate Miller, an assurance intern at Aronson LLC, shares the top tips from that event, which featured a fireside chat with Gary Shapiro, president and CEO of the Consumer Technology Association, and Scott Case, the founding CTO of Priceline.com and founding CEO of Startup America. 


On February 18, the NVTC Small Business and Entrepreneur Committee sponsored a fireside chat entitled “Journey to Success: Overcoming Obstacles in Entrepreneurship.” The event was moderated by Gary Shapiro, President and CEO of the Consumer Technology Association, who interviewed Scott Case, the founding CTO of Priceline.com and founding CEO of Startup America.

The discussion focused on Case’s experiences throughout his lengthy career as a key member of several startup companies; Case also shared his thoughts on the potential pitfalls startup companies can fall victim to. Some of Case’s key points to attendees included:

  • The time commitment required to be a successful entrepreneur.
  • The importance of creating and expanding connections in a growing area such as the D.C.
  • Overcoming failure repeatedly is a necessary trait to success.
  • The importance of maintaining a valuable network with the appropriate resources.

Case’s entrepreneurial journey started with part time jobs as an assistant for a plumbing company and a well driller, and running a local lawn-mowing business, where he gained an understanding of mastering his trade, servicing customers, and constantly looking for the next opportunity. While attending college at the University of Connecticut, Case spent his free time developing an advanced flight simulator with fellow classmates only to discover that the startup could not generate sales due to a lack of marketing. As a result, a key lesson that Case carries with him to this day is the need to supplement a great product with a sales and marketing team and other supporting functions.

Undeterred, Case shunned more secure employment opportunities to continue working with startups and, following an introduction to Priceline.com Founder Jay Walker a few years later, joined Priceline as the founding CTO. During his tenure, Case’s team at Priceline developed a “name your own price” system in the early days of the internet that allowed the company to grow significantly and successfully undergo an IPO with an initial market capitalization of more than $12 billion. Case attributes his success at Priceline to his understanding of the available technology, as well as the ability to effectively market it and while creating a team willing to try a number of ventures without fear of failure.

Since leaving Priceline in 2000, Case has co-founded or led several other ventures focused on technology, entrepreneurship and philanthropy such as Main Street Genome, Startup America Partnership, Malaria No More, and most recently, Potomac Innovation, a new business travel purchasing company. Case stressed the need for entrepreneurs to remain connected to advisers, financiers, peers and customers if they are to be successful, and noted that incubators, such as 1776 in D.C. and others in startup hubs such as New York City and Silicone Valley, can greatly help a new entrepreneur. Case also stressed the importance of minimizing government regulation to allow new business owners to focus on their core activities, but noted that government can help by listening and responding to entrepreneurs’ needs – such as the recent decision by the city of Nashville, Tennessee to significantly increase its broadband access, which appears to be attracting entrepreneurs to the city.

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As companies try to keep employees healthy and lower the overall cost of care, it is important that employers bring back the tradition of the primary care physician (PCP). Whether you are the HR director in charge of selecting health plans for your company or the CEO who is paying them, Amy Turner, executive director and COO of Innovation Health, provides the top four reasons you should be advocating for your employees to engage with a PCP. 


We all remember the days of the HMO plan – limited care options that left many employees looking for more choice and access to care for themselves and their families. To help meet this employee request many HR directors began looking toward PPO plans, which offered larger networks of doctors and specialists, but at a higher cost than the HMO plans. Today, employees want the same options, but with the increase in high-deductible health plans, many of them are also taking a closer look at cost.

As someone who has been in the health industry for more than a decade, I have seen a lot of changes take place, but one that strikes me as imperative to address is the lack of people who have, and engage with, a primary care physician (PCP). Plan options and policy changes aside, in the past people relied on family doctors for everything. Doctors intimately knew a family’s history, often treating several generations of family members. As we try to keep our employees healthy and lower the overall cost of care, it is important that we bring this tradition back with the PCP.

Whether you are the HR director in charge of selecting health plans for your company or the CEO who is paying them, here are the top four reasons you should be advocating for your employees to engage with a PCP!

They are focused on preventive care

A PCP can be your employee’s main health care provider for their most common medical problems. But they also look out for your employee’s overall health, recommend screenings, make referrals and encourage healthy habits.

They help maintain good health

A PCP provides employees with continual care. And that’s what good health maintenance over a lifetime requires. PCPs can treat the whole person, taking into account both your employee’s history and existing conditions.

They serve as an important point of contact and resource

PCPs are personal doctors who can coordinate care. That takes stress off your employees as their doctors are ready to make sure their best interests are met. Furthermore, they are often the first people  your employees can contact when they have a question or a problem. He or she can provide answers and care, or recommend a specialist when needed.

They help keep costly ER visits down

Because they will be your employees’ first line of defense, PCPs can answer questions, call in a prescription or even suggest the action your employees should take.  This will help them to avoid costly ER visits as they are able to manage any health issues before they escalate.

Once your employees select a PCP, make sure they are aware that under the Affordable Care Act they’re entitled to one, free yearly checkup. You read that correctly – every single employee you have can receive one free check-up a year.  This is something all of them should take advantage of. So, if you aren’t doing it already, please express to your employees the importance of building a PCP relationship and getting a yearly checkup. Not only will their health likely improve, but it could save your company and themselves valuable dollars.

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