In his guest blog, Earth Networks Chief Marketing Officer Anuj Agrawal shares an inside look into the power of environmental data and how it is making cities smarter, cleaner and more resilient. Agrawal will be speaking on the Smart Cities Panel at the 2017 Capital Data Summit taking place on February 15, 2017 at The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner.


EN new color logoYou interact with environmental data on a daily basis. It’s there when you turn your smartphone on to silence your alarm. It’s on your TV when you sip your morning coffee. And it’s on the radio during your commute to work. Free weather data and other types of environmental information helps us pick out our outfits, time our commute and plan our after-work activities. But can it do more than that?

We here at Earth Networks think so. And so does the Smart City Council Readiness Program. All ten of the Smart Cities Council Readiness Challenge Grant finalists named energy or some form of the environment as their top priority. This is because weather and greenhouse gas (GHG) data play vital roles in making cities more livable, workable, sustainable and resilient.

Commercial-grade weather data provides more than just a weekly forecast. In fact, its diverse capabilities make it a key component for resilient cities. Weather data affects a city’s population and some aspects of the economy; offering insights that no other data set can provide. Advanced weather data feeds and historical data is easily integrated into predictive models that can provide cities with smart decision-support so that you can plan for both routine and severe weather events.

As people begin to move out of the suburbs and into the cities, city pollution is on the rise. The scientific community estimates that 70% of GHGs are generated in urban areas. GHG data is so important because if you can quantify the amount of emissions in your city, you can make steps towards controlling it. With GHG data, smart cities can develop smart policies to reign in those emissions and have local, accurate baseline data to support their initiatives.

Environmental data is critical for smart city development. Both weather data and GHG data offer insights that can make communities safer, healthier and, ultimately, smarter. To learn more about how weather and GHG data can both help mitigate financial, operational and human risk in smart cities developing across the world, don’t miss the Smart Cities Panel at the Capital Data Summit on February 15, 2017.

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NVTC has published the second infographic in its new research series. In this data analytics-focused piece, we’ll take a look at the data behind the compelling numbers in the infographic.

NVTC Data Infographic 2017

Big Data and Analytics Drive Growth

By 2020, the amount of digital data produced will exceed 40 zettabytes, which is roughly equivalent to 6,080 years of HD video, a period longer than recorded history. More data has been created in the last two years than in the entire previous history of the human race. The total amount of data captured and stored by industry doubles every 14.4 months.

Over 3.5 billion Google searches are made daily and 205 billion emails are sent each day. Facebook has over 30 petabytes of user-generated data and Twitter sees over 230 million tweets daily; for scale, one petabyte is roughly equivalent to 13.3 years of HD video. Gartner projects that connected devices making up the Internet of Things (IoT) will grow by two billion to over 8.4 billion IoT devices in use this year, representing one billion more devices than people on the planet.

However, less than 0.5 percent of data created is analyzed or used.

Funding & Revenue

Venture capital funding for Greater Washington companies offering analytics products and services totaled over $93 million in 2016; the largest single funding round was $12 million for ThreatQuotient, announced in August.

According to Gartner, consumers and businesses spent nearly $14 billion on devices, which is expected to grow to $17 billion in 2017 while IoT services are expected to reach $273 billion.

IDC projects double-digit growth – a CAGR of 11.7 percent – in the big data and analytics market through 2020, growing from $130.1 billion in 2016 to $203 billion in 2020. IDC also projects that the IoT market will reach $1.46 trillion with global IoT revenue of $7.06 billion by 2020, with retail and manufacturing as the two leading IoT industry verticals.

Workforce

Analytics talent continues to be in high demand with no signs of slowing in the immediate future. Glassdoor named data scientist as 2016’s hottest job across all business sectors, not just IT. Data engineer was ranked third and analytics manager ranked fifth on this same list. One-third of surveyed NVTC members indicate they are currently hiring data analysts.

Conclusion

Big data and analytics is undeniably a growth industry by every possible measure and no region is better equipped to meet the demands emerging from the new data ecosystem than Greater Washington. With its leading data analytics firms, highly-skilled workforce, expertise serving federal, state and local government customers, and many outstanding academic institutions, Greater Washington’s big data assets are unmatched. Promoting growth and partnership opportunities across the region is why NVTC is hosting its inaugural Capital Data Summit on February 15, 2017 at The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner. Click here to learn more about this premier big data event.

Click here to learn more about NVTC’s research initiatives or email NVTC Research and Strategic Initiatives Manager John Shaw.

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