1704 Titans Larry Prior 435a (2)On April 7, over 400 members of the region’s technology community came together at The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner for an NVTC Titans breakfast featuring Larry Prior, president and CEO of CSRA, a leading provider of next-generation IT solutions and professional services for U.S. government agencies and programs.

Prior highlighted the “fundamental refresh” occurring in tech today, being driven by demand for the cloud and processing capabilities at the edge. This next-gen IT revolution isn’t just happening in the commercial sector; government clients are also expecting automated workflow and agile network systems that function like the apps on their personal devices.

Prior also discussed  last year’s merger between CSC and SRA to form CSRA. He shared how the merger has allowed CSRA to scale its business to meet the government’s IT needs. Through increased financial investments in R&D, leveraging a newly-expanded talent pool and bolstering partnerships, CSRA has been able to scale its business. Prior also noted how consolidations and mergers are becoming a more common trend in the tech industry.

Scaling is happening at a regional level in Greater Washington, too, according to Prior. The region’s strengths in partnership-building, collaboration, commitment to mission and passion for customers gives organizations here a strong foundation and competitive advantage, particularly with government customers. Prior noted that Greater Washington is a “model for tomorrow” in improving technology and impacting change on a national level.

Check out video of Prior’s remarks:

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Interested in transitioning to the cloud? Wondering where to start? Then you’ll want to read this NVTC member guest blog from LeaseWeb’s Julia Gortinskaya first to get prepared for your cloud transition.


leaseweb-logoFrom both a business and an IT perspective, migrating to the cloud can be a good option for many businesses. But, it’s not something that can be done without the right research and preparation. If you want to be successful when migrating to the cloud, you need open communication with both your own team and hosting provider, as well as a clearly defined cloud migration strategy that is connected to your business needs. What follow are five tips to help you get started:

1. Share your roadmap

Setting goals is everything. Your goals for migrating to the cloud should be closely connected to your business goals. How fast do you want to grow (i.e. how scalable does your technology need to be)? Who in your organization needs what functionality in order to reach which goal?

Select a cloud partner who is open to discussion about your roadmap and its implementation. Together you can create a technology roadmap that best supports your ambitions. Ideally, your cloud partner is a trusted advisor who shares his or her expertise with you. Keeping in close contact with your partner and sharing the load will also enable you to divide tasks between you: while your cloud provider focuses on hosting a cloud platform and making sure your servers are up-and-running, you will be able to concentrate on creating more value for your customers.

The value of leveraging a third party can only be achieved when both sides understand their responsibilities and expectations. This means communication between you and your partner should be one of your top priorities.

2. Check certifications and compliance statements

Security and compliance are enablers, not obstacles. When migrating to the cloud, it is important to know in advance which certifications your cloud partner has, what exactly is covered and the independent auditor monitoring process. For instance, privacy and compliance certifications are necessary for organizations supporting compliant workloads.

Since security and compliance are shared responsibilities between you and your cloud provider, and perhaps other third parties as well, you’ll likely be able to benefit from the certifications your cloud provider already has in place. If your enterprise data is stored on servers in a datacenter owned by your cloud provider, the physical security of the datacenter is the cloud partner’s responsibility.

Make sure to find answers to questions such as ‘who has access to my data?’, ‘where is my data stored geographically?’ and ‘what are the export restrictions?’ You may prefer to store data in a specific region, but may also be bound to a location by customer contracts and/or privacy laws.

And don’t forget, certifications and regulations evolve over time. Cloud providers should follow developments closely and advise on any action you need to take.  While you may not want to come across as suspicious, you should ask your partner to deliver proof of any certifications.

3. Look for a partner who can scale quickly

When migrating to the cloud, there are different options and delivery models for specific workloads: private, public, hybrid, hyper-scale, on premise and off-premise. New ones are developed at a rapid pace. Explore the options (and the degree of service, the security and the expected costs) that are available for your needs.

Whichever partner you choose, select one that can act the moment you need to scale quickly. If your business requires you to add server capacity either temporarily or for a longer period, your partner should be able to provide the flexibility and speed that you need.

4. Train your people before, during and after

Most cloud projects require a different set of skills from your IT staff to implement and manage workloads (e.g. APIs, open source platforms).Traditional skill sets in server, network and desktop administration are not needed in a cloud environment as they are embedded in the service. In most instances, re-skilling employees in more DevOps centric areas can be wise.

Instead of acquiring engineering skills, your IT staff will have to learn to think more as a cloud architect (which will probably be more challenging than being an administrator anyway). And since tactical day-to-day support is managed by your cloud partner, IT staff should spend more time developing and delivering services and applications that demonstrate direct value to the business.

5. Consider changes in architecture

We have come a long way from ‘one server for one service.’ Cloud computing changes the way applications are deployed and resources are delivered. Your current architecture might work in the cloud, but may also need some changes. Some applications can be migrated to the cloud, while others might require adaptation, such as the decoupling of data. You might also benefit from taking a more service-oriented approach, from cloud services delivered through API’s. Try to design an architecture that will give you full advantage of native cloud features.

You can download the full checklist “10 Do’s and Don’ts When Migrating to the cloud” here.

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This week’s guest blog post is by Qlarion. Qlarion helps the public sector use BI to effectively manage, access and understand information in order to make more effective business decisions. In their blog, Qlarion provides a wrap-up of NVTC’s Big Data and Analytics Committee Meeting that took place in March.


QlarionOn March 7, Qlarion’s CEO, Jake Bittner, moderated a discussion at Northern Virginia Technology Council’s (NVTC) Big Data and Analytics Committee Meeting, where Anthony (Tony) Fung, Virginia Deputy Secretary of Technology; Ernie Steidle, COO/CIO, Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services; and Anthony Wood, Program Manager, Virginia Information Technologies Agency’s Innovation Center of Excellence, shared thoughts on the challenges and opportunities related to big data and analytics in Virginia.

Deputy Secretary of Technology Tony Fung kicked off the event with a discussion of the landscape of data analytics across the Commonwealth. Deputy Secretary Fung emphasized that there have been individual analytics success stories among several state agencies and the opportunity for real progress through analytics has never been better.

Virginia now has the resources in place to implement big data and analytics programs on a large scale.

In 2016, Governor McAuliffe issued Executive Directive 7, which mandates data sharing across state agencies. Deputy Secretary Fung announced that a final report, which will provide agencies with more detail about how to comply with the directive, will be released in a few weeks.

Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services’ Ernie Steidle reported that, in addition to the executive directive, the state legislature recently passed HB 2457, which enables data sharing across Health and Human Resources agencies. The law dictates that all HHR agencies and departments, for the purpose of data sharing, be considered a single organization. Eliminating barriers between the agencies will increase efficiency and streamline services for constituents. Based on the results of the initiative, other agency groups, such as Public Safety, could adapt the same model.

The state has solidified its commitment to modernizing its technology programs by forming the Virginia Information Technologies Agency’s Innovation Center of Excellence (VITA ICE). Virginia Information Technologies Agency’s Innovation Center of Excellence’s Anthony Wood explained that VITA ICE’s primary goal is to evaluate and implement new technologies by leveraging the capabilities of Virginia’s technology companies. It’s developed a number of resources to establish relationships with Virginia tech companies.

State leadership is also intent on securing internal buy-in and educating government decision makers on the value of big data and analytics. The upcoming Governor’s Data Analytics Summit, an event exclusively for state and local government employees, will feature a lineup of speakers and panelists who will discuss how agencies can overcome challenges and achieve their goals through analytics. The event will offer actionable strategies for scoping and launching analytics projects.

This blog post originally appeared on Qlarion’s website.

Click here to learn more about the Big Data and Analytics Committee.

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