CFO Awards17 Web Graphic

By Renee Brown Small, CEO, Cyber Human Capital, and Contributing Editor, CyberCapital.us Blog

“You don’t have the ability to make sound decisions until you’ve had some experience under your belt.” – Rob Carey, Vice President, Cybersecurity, Cloud and UC Solutions, General Dynamics Information Technology

Carey v2Some of the questions fresh graduates who want to enter into cybersecurity are: “Where should I start?” and “What’s the best experience I can get?” Rob Carey of General Dynamics Information Technology (GDIT) addresses these questions and gives further insight into what he, and those like him, look for in future cybersecurity professionals.

Rob Carey started in the United States Navy as an undersea weapons systems engineer before he was transferred to the Department Navy’s Chief Information Officer office, where one of his first jobs was to roll out smart cards. He became the CIO himself in 2006, held the post of principal deputy chief information officer from 2010 until his retirement in 2014, and at present is the vice president of Cybersecurity, Cloud and Unified Communications Solutions within the Global Solutions Division of GDIT. As such, he is presently concerned with a wide range of cybersecurity concerns.

Rob remarks that part of his present work involves cloud computing, particularly where cybersecurity affects those using cloud computing. As an example, Rob remarks that, while accessing a commercial cloud computing environment from a government location and then doing what one needs to get done in that environment may sound simple, but the reality is that it is not. In addition, Rob is presently setting up a lab designed to evaluate various cyber tools and determine how well these work in a given environment, allowing GDIT to propose solutions to the government, rather than merely riding on what is already commercially available.

When asked who are the best candidates for his team, Rob looks at a candidate’s experience level. His people are very much in touch with present technologies and know how security operation centers operate. Rob notes that the best person for the job isn’t necessarily the candidate with a Master’s degree in electrical engineering, but could be someone who has a particular approach to solving the problem at hand and who has some technical knowledge of cyber. A candidate having real-world experience is very important to him and his team, as it is those kinds of security professionals who understand how things work in the real world. He notes that he is looking for people who have had experience in security operations centers, as the actual hands-on experience gained from working there is necessary for designing systems, which is a part of what his department handles.

Along with running his department, Rob is presently doing his part in helping the next generation of cybersecurity professionals gain practical experience, as he is sponsoring half a dozen senior students at George Mason University, helping them out with a class project that involves creating a framework to work on a cybersecurity matrix and to evaluate cybersecurity.

At present, GDIT is looking to expand as it changes the way it engages its customers, both in the United States government and in the cyber industry, and Rob notes that being part of the growing team that he’s presently handling would be a great opportunity.


Renee Brown Small is the author of Magnetic Hiring: Your Company’s Secret Weapon to Attracting Top Cyber Security Talent and CEO of Cyber Human Capital, an HR consultancy that specializes in innovative ways companies hire and keep cybersecurity talent. Download a free copy of her book here. Brown Small is contributing editor of the CyberCapital.us blog.

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VEI Logo Sized9,000.

That is the number of Veterans hired by NVTC companies since the NVTC Veterans Employment Initiative was launched in 2013.

Going into its fifth year, the NVTC Veterans Employment Initiative (VEI) continues to expand its impact. The VEI connects Veterans and military spouses to employment opportunities within Virginia’s technology community and provides support to NVTC member companies in their efforts to recruit, hire, train and retain qualified Veteran employees.

As we look ahead to 2018, join us in celebrating the VEI’s 2017 accomplishments:

  • Over 200 NVTC member organizations participating in the VEI
  • Over 2,000 Veterans hires by NVTC member companies
  • Over 2,000 volunteer hours in support of the VEI by NVTC members
  • Over 1 million Veteran resumes accessible on USTechVets.org, the VEI’s resume database and online job resource portal for Veterans and military spouses (free for NVTC members)
  • 650 active recruiters on USTechVets.org
  • 48 Virginia Values Veterans (V3) certified NVTC member companies
  • 3 VEI VETWORKING sessions hosted 44 Veteran and Military spouse job seekers for high-powered networking, interviews and resume coaching
  • 3 Recruiting Days hosted which had 62 companies represented with over 240 Veteran and military spouses jobseekers


Learn more about boosting your organization’s tech recruitment efforts through the VEI by contacting VEI Executive Director Steve Jordon.

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Tech Talent Initiative Logo - For WebNVTC is partnering with Virginia’s Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities (CPID) to offer member employers access to training and resources to help meet their tech talent needs. Through the CPID project, employers can tap into:

  • Recruiting and screening activities to help attract qualified applicants
  • Employee development and retention services, including financial incentives and grant funding
  • Business consultation and planning to enhance your business performance

CPID_banner1Click here to learn more about CPID available services or email CPID IT Sector Coordinator Lauren Parker or contact Lauren by phone at 703-689-1793.

Announcing a NEW Webinar Series!

NVTC is currently hosting a series of webinars detailing how you can take advantage of the resources to support the relatively untapped talent pool of individuals with disabilities and Veterans. The webinar series will also address assistive technologies and disability etiquette. Members of your human resource, facilities operations, talent acquisition, diversity and inclusion, training, compliance, and legal departments are encouraged to participate!

Feb. 15: Office Ergonomics, Universal Design and Assistive Technology
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Paula K. Marin, OTR/L, Assistive Technology Specialist with CPID, will discuss office ergonomics, universal design and assistive technology within the IT field. Register here.

March 15: Diversity at Work and Disability Etiquette
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
LaPearl Smith, Business Development Manager with the Department for Aging and Rehabilitation Services, and Diana McBride, Business Relation Specialist with the Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired, will provide information on diversity at work and disability etiquette. Register here.

On. Jan. 18, NVTC hosted the first webinar on recruiting, hiring and training individuals with disabilities. Kathy West-Evans, M.P.A, CRC, Director of Business Relations for Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR), offered useful information on affirmative action strategies to assist businesses in recruiting, hiring and training individuals with disabilities and Veterans into their workforce.

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NVTC provides members with many valuable benefits and programs. The best way to realize the full value of your membership investment is to take advantage of all your membership benefits. Here are 25 ways to make the most out of your NVTC membership.

MemberListLogo1. Take advantage of NVTC’s inclusive membership. All employees of member companies can participate as members. Strengthen your membership roster by engaging more employees in NVTC’s events, committees and programs.

2. Join a committee. NVTC’s committees focus on specific industries or interests and offer increased brand exposure, leadership, presentation, panel and professional development opportunities, as well as professional development for your employees. NVTC committees include Small Business & Entrepreneur, Big Data & Analytics, Data Center & Cloud Infrastructure and more!

3. Attend NVTC Signature Events like Titans, TechCelebration and NVTC’s Capital CybersecurityCapital Data and Capital Health Tech Summits. NVTC’s Signature Events draw hundreds of top technology executives and feature well-known and relevant speakers from all industry sectors. If you want exposure and the best networking, our events are where you need to be!

4. Post FREE job listings and receive FREE access to USTechVets.org, a database of more than one million Veteran resumes through the NVTC Veterans Employment Initiative (VEI). NVTC also provides resources and training through the VEI to promote best practices in Veteran recruitment, training and retention, connections with the region’s academic institutions.

5. Enhance your organization’s public policy advocacy efforts. NVTC is front and center in Richmond to advocate for issues that are important to members and to advance a pro-business, pro-technology agenda. NVTC’s full-time advocacy team can offer counsel on your policy objectives and help you connect to policymakers.

6. Promote and brand your business through NVTC’s sponsorship and advertising opportunities. Reach thousands of technology decision-makers or target a very specific market or industry sector. Contact Yolanda Lee at ylee@nvtc.org to create your personalized advertising/sponsorship plan.

Techtopia_logo7. Put your business on the Techtopia Maps. For more than 17 years, the NVTC Techtopia Map has been our way of “branding” Northern Virginia and the National Capital region as a premiere technology corridor. Sign up today to ensure that your company is represented among other key players in the technology community.

Tech Talent Initiative Logo - For Web8. Participate in NVTC’s Tech Talent Initiative (TTI). Leverage your organization’s efforts to recruit, hire, retain and upskill your workforce and expand your connections to the academic community through NVTC’s TTI. Access TTI’s resource portal to learn how you can participate in NVTC’s workforce research efforts and assistance opportunities.

9. Utilize NVTC’s searchable member directory. NVTC members have access to a detailed online business-to business directory to help you find business contacts and potential partners. Offering complete contact information of all other NVTC members, the members-only directory is one of the most valuable tools in your membership.

10. Contribute an NVTC guest blog post and showcase your organization’s unique expertise, research activities and thought leadership. The submission process is ongoing.

11. Recruit top Veteran and military spouse talent at one of the VEI’s Recruiting Days or VETWORKING sessions throughout the year.

12. Read the NVTC Daily News Summary in your inbox and keep up to date on the biggest technology articles of the day from all major and trade publications.

13. Participate in the Tech Talent Initiative’s webinar series on ways your organization can take advantage of the resources to support the relatively untapped talent pool of individuals with disabilities and Veterans.

14. Network on LinkedIn! Did you know NVTC has a LinkedIn Group? Share your organization’s thought leadership, start a discussion and network with your tech industry peers 24-7. Join the group today! You’ll also want to follow NVTC’s LinkedIn Company Page.

15. Take advantage of incumbent worker funding available to NVTC members. NVTC member companies with less than 250 employees can save up to 90 percent of the cost of industry-recognized IT and cybersecurity training and certification courses through the Incumbent Worker Training Initiative of Northern Virginia.

16. Check out NVTC’s infographics based on industry and member research conducted by NVTC on topics like cybersecurity, data analytics and more. Feel free to utilize and share on your social platforms.

MemberAdvantage logoCMYK - MarketPlace 04191717. Start saving! NVTC’s Member Advantage program provides members with money saving member-exclusive discounts on a variety of valuable products and services while facilitating mutually beneficial business relationships between NVTC member companies.

18. Highlight your organization in the monthly Member Spotlight section on the NVTC website and eNewsletter or submit your news for publication on the Member News section of the NVTC website.

19. Access NVTC’s members-only Resource Library that offers a comprehensive collection of webinars, podcasts, articles and other publications developed by NVTC and its members.

20. Take advantage of special savings on HR and business performance solutions through Insperity. Through the Technology Advisor Program, NVTC members have exclusive access to preferred pricing and special discounts on select Insperity HR solutions, including Workforce Optimization, Workforce Synchronization, Payroll Services, Time and Attendance, Organizational Planning, Recruiting Services, Expense Management, and Financial Services.

21.  Hire an intern through VEI Scholars. NVTC member companies can provide student Veterans from 14 NVTC member colleges and universities with professional mentoring and meaningful work-based experiences by participating in the Scholars program.

22. Access exclusive savings for NVTC members at WeWork. NVTC members qualify for 25% off for up to six months on Host Desks, Dedicated Desks or Private Offices at WeWork Tysons.

23. Stay informed about NVTC and the latest tech industry news and trends by reading NVTC’s The Voice of Technology magazine and NVTC’s weekly member eNewsletter.

24. Utilize discounted health screenings. NVTC members get an exclusive discount on a comprehensive physical health exam offered through Inova Health System’s Executive Health Screening Program.

25. Recruit on NVTC’s job board. NVTC offers a job board for NVTC members to post positions and for applicants to apply.

Not a member yet? Email the membership team today!

 

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CFO Awards17 Web Graphic

By Renee Brown Small, CEO, Cyber Human Capital, and Contributing Editor, CyberCapital.us Blog

“We certainly have the responsibility to bring talented, qualified, experienced personnel to our clients. We have a responsibility to our employees to grow them into that type of capability.” – Rhonda Dyer, ‎Vice President Strategy, Sales Support & Solutions, SAIC, on the need to develop cybersecurity experts

Dyer v1Cybercrime may be on the rise, but training the people necessary to combat it is rocky at present. Cybersecurity is still not a priority in most college curricula, and addressing the issue of providing would-be cybersecurity professionals the right kind of education is something that Rhonda Dyer is presently working on.

Rhonda got her break into cybersecurity around ten years ago, when she was offered an opportunity to support cyber and develop the business from a capture sales perspective. She is passionate about ensuring that all that she delivers to her clients is secure and that her clients know as much as they can about how to protect themselves and their machines from cyber attacks. Rhonda defines her job as one to ensure that her clients have a secure way to get their job done and also points out that security has to be top-of-mind at all times.

Rhonda is presently working at SAIC, and at the moment, the company is moving into three areas of cybersecurity. The first is in the realm of cyberspace operations, where SAIC works on supporting the entire cycle of planning, operations and targeting, and in this realm SAIC has won a contract with the U.S. Cyber Command. The second area is in defense technology, particularly in perimeter security, and this is an area that SAIC will be rolling out soon. The third area, that she is really passionate about, is in education. In this realm SAIC is providing opportunities for high school students to learn about cybersecurity. She also notes that, while only ten percent of the overall cyber workforce is female, the operations programs presently active in SAIC are run by women. She says, “I encourage everybody to make sure their children, especially their daughters, are engaged in STEM education and coding. Also, recognize that the cyber field is broad. You could be doing legal in cyber, policy in cyber. Even if you don’t have a technical bench and you don’t want to be a cyber engineer, there’s a role for you to play during these national assets.”

Rhonda shares that her clients are looking for people who could be up and working the day they start, which means experienced cybersecurity professionals. These cybersecurity professionals don’t necessarily have to know about all the different aspects of a company when they start out, as Rhonda remarks that SAIC can provide training to cover those aspects. That said, she notes that people who have a background in operations are in demand, and as SAIC is involved with the US military, it isn’t surprising that a sizeable number of their hires are veterans who have backgrounds in network handling or in physical security. Rhonda also notes that she also looks for people who have been cleared, security-wise, and who are certified and have been working in mission-critical environments.

Rhonda remarks that SAIC strives to be a career destination, and notes that those who choose to work for SAIC will be able to get training and keep their certifications up to date. She also notes that SAIC is striving for diversity in its talent, as different perspectives are critical in cybersecurity.


Renee Brown Small is the author of Magnetic Hiring: Your Company’s Secret Weapon to Attracting Top Cyber Security Talent and CEO of Cyber Human Capital, an HR consultancy that specializes in innovative ways companies hire and keep cybersecurity talent. Download a free copy of her book here. Brown Small is contributing editor of the CyberCapital.us blog.

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CFO Awards17 Web Graphic

By Renee Brown Small, CEO, Cyber Human Capital, and Contributing Editor, CyberCapital.us Blog

“I think it’s a fascinating field. Jobs are plenty, they’re not going away. This is an industry that’s growing exponentially.” – Scott White, Associate Professor & Director of Cybersecurity, George Washington University, on the field of cybersecurity

Dr Scott J White v2While a lot of colleges aren’t properly creating cybersecurity specialists, the George Washington University is facing the concern head-on with a certification program in Computer Security and Information Assurance, with the possibility of applying this to a Master’s in Cybersecurity if a student decides to pursue a master’s. And Scott White is directly involved with this program.

Scott White began his career in cybersecurity in military intelligence, after which he got a doctoral degree in clinical criminology, where he worked in the fields of behavioral analysis and profiling. After working for a government intelligence security service, he then entered academia, where he taught about criminology, psychology and behavior. He then entered the cybersecurity industry around seven years ago, and while none of his degrees were technical in nature his skill set places him in the right position to analyze human factors and adversarial aspects of computing.

Scott notes that the cyber industry is so wide-ranging that any discipline applicable to the non-cyber world has some bearing with the work conducted within the cyber industry. For those who are seeking a change of career and entering the cyber industry, Scott recommends taking a master’s program in either computer science or cybersecurity at a reputable institution. He also notes that learning about the software isn’t enough, given the speed at which change takes place within the industry, which means that such aspects as analysis, critical thinking and critical reasoning are more important.

Scott remarks that skill sets are more important than actual titles and degrees where cyber work is concerned and gives the example of an auditor taking up cyber auditing, as the skill sets used in both types of auditing are similar. Scott expounds on this by noting that that someone interested in cybersecurity may need to deconstruct their existing skill set to see how applicable their existing skills already are for cybersecurity. One example is of fine arts majors going into security, “One of the things I’m constantly surprised by is when I meet people in cyber security, the range of disciplines they have. I’ve met people who were in fine arts, in dance, and you say to yourself how does a fine arts major who studied dance, how is that relevant to cybersecurity? Well when you really think of how a dancer moves, how they train. The almost arithmetic quality to dance, you can understand how that thinking can apply to the cybersecurity world when we’re looking at adversaries, how they think and construct their particular attack scenario.”

Where George Washington University’s academic curriculum is concerned, Scott notes that he looked at three different forms of accreditation – National Security Agency, the industry standard CISSP and the national initiative for cybersecurity education – and made sure that the underlying pillars from all three are represented in the curriculum to make it easier for their students to receive accreditation. The classes themselves are a balance of theory and critical thinking, and laboratory and live experimentation.

When asked about people looking to transfer from another profession, Scott says this, “I think the greatest thing I would want to convey is that, look at your skills set that you possess today. See what you do in your workplace, and then take the time to find out how your skill set is applicable to this industry. Because I think a lot of people, a lot of the people will ask themselves how their job title fits. And with that job title, they will not see how that is connected to our industry. And the fact of the matter is it very well may be. So take some time, deconstruct what you do and the skills that you have. Speak to [a recruiter, career coach or someone in HR]…and see how that skill set is applicable in this industry.”


Renee Brown Small is the author of Magnetic Hiring: Your Company’s Secret Weapon to Attracting Top Cyber Security Talent and CEO of Cyber Human Capital, an HR consultancy that specializes in innovative ways companies hire and keep cybersecurity talent. Download a free copy of her book here. Brown Small is contributing editor of the CyberCapital.us blog.

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CFO Awards17 Web Graphic

By Renee Brown Small, CEO, Cyber Human Capital, and Contributing Editor, CyberCapital.us Blog

“They are self-directed and can self-manage themselves. They are adaptable, they have the ability to learn and to change because it is a dynamic environment. They are passionate about security – one indication is a home lab.” – David McGill, Vice President, Strategy & Business Development, ICF, on the kind of people who will succeed in cybersecurity

McGill_David v2A recent article noted that, in the first quarter of 2017 alone, an average of 858 malware specimens were created, and David McGill is one of those on the front lines of dealing with such cybersecurity threats. He has a particularly advanced view of these, as his work with the Department of Defense enables him to see threats days or weeks before these become known in the commercial world.

David got involved in cybersecurity full-time in 2011, and at present, he is focusing on cybersecurity vulnerability in operational technology and industrial control systems, and he is also involved with a team that works on other aspects of cybersecurity. One of the things the team is presently working on is creating a synthetic network where malicious code can be inserted, to better train cyber operators to recognize these and thus become more effective. His team is also looking into virtual reality as well as working with the Army Research Laboratory, and still others are working with corporations to help with these companies’ cyber hygiene, which is all about the processes, procedures, policies, guidance, governance and risk management.

David also remarks that one of the newest groups of ICF now works with clients on enterprise resilience, which means identifying the threats to the enterprise’s mission, after which plans are created to address and respond to such threats. He shared that a client company uses gaming technology to investigate complex decision making or create very interesting exercises where the end result is open-ended, rather than predetermined. David also adds that, no matter how much one prepares, the possibility always exists that an organization will be hit with a threat in a way that wasn’t foreseen, which is why the use of gaming technology is appealing.

Granted, technical know-how and, if necessary, clearances are needed to become a cybersecurity professional, but it’s not just these which are needed. David shares that, where a cybersecurity professional is concerned, people who are flexible, self-aware, self-directed, who love to learn and who can manage themselves are what are needed, as the environment is very dynamic. He cites the example of having to deal with an emergency one day and then becoming a help desk analyst the next, and noted that emotional intelligence is also a necessity, since the professional will need to deal with different kinds of people. He also notes that passion is very important, given the environment, and that one indication of this is if an applicant runs a lab from his own home.

David is always on the lookout for good people. He asks for referrals from his team members and from within the company itself for potential cybersecurity experts he could hire.


Renee Brown Small is the author of Magnetic Hiring: Your Company’s Secret Weapon to Attracting Top Cyber Security Talent and CEO of Cyber Human Capital, an HR consultancy that specializes in innovative ways companies hire and keep cybersecurity talent. Download a free copy of her book here. Brown Small is contributing editor of the CyberCapital.us blog.

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Listen up cyber startup companies: Greater Washington is the place to be for expansion; that’s according to top cyber CEOs building some of the biggest cyber growth companies today.

The region’s cyber leaders came together on November 15 at NVTC’s second annual Capital Cybersecurity Summit and shared their unique insights into scaling their businesses and their teams into world-class organizations in the Greater Washington region.

Panelists included John Ackerly, CEO and Co-Founder, Virtru; Rohyt Belani, Co-Founder and CEO, PhishMe; Jack Huffard, President, COO and Co-Founder, Tenable; and Tiffany Olson Jones, CEO, Distil Networks. BlueDelta Capital Partners Co-Founder Mark Frantz moderated.

Here are some of the key takeaways from the discussion:

  • In moving from startup to a growth company, panelists agreed that companies must fully engage their market segments and tighten their focus to ensure they are serving a specific customer need before expanding.
  • What sets Greater Washington apart from other regions for cyber growth companies? Employees. The region’s talented cyber workforce and its investment in the cyber mission is unmatched anywhere else. The region is retaining top cyber talent too.
  • Greater Washington must seize the opportunity to attract and retain millennial tech talent, especially in cybersecurity – and can serve as a national example in doing so.

Full video from the panel below:

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