Author Archives: Allison Gilmore

Workflow and Process Automation Series Part 1: Re-evaluating Your Processes

July 20th, 2016 | Posted by Allison Gilmore in Guest Blogs | Member Blog Posts - (Comments Off)

This week on NVTC’s blog, Marty Herbert of NeoSystems Corp. shares the first in a series of tips for workflow and process automation.


Marty HIf you are an ERP user, you likely know that most applications are rich with many features that address the nuances of running projects, especially if you are a government contractor.  However, no application can address the many steps that an organization must go through to accomplish what might be seen on the surface as a simple task.

Take ‘billing’ for example. I was asked a while back to determine how to route a bill for approval, and I thought it would be a “piece of cake”. Create bill. Send to approver. Get approval. Bill is right – Send to customer. Bill is wrong – rinse and repeat.  For this article, we’ll use commonly known GovCon ERP, Deltek Costpoint, as an example.  This system is very good at the first part. If you need to create a bill, you can create bill replete with support for hours worked and costs incurred. The problem, however, is there is no nice and simple way of implementing a workflow process that will accommodate most organization’s review and approval routines within the ERP framework.  That’s not a knock against Costpoint, no ERP systems on the market adequately address this issue, especially when you magnify it by the many, many other processes, that an organization has in place to accomplish their back office routines.

Over the next six weeks we will be taking a look at several areas where workflow plays a big role and how to leverage the automation of workflows via integration with your ERP. Companies unaware of how to automate in these areas are wasting precious time in determining the process, missing steps and ultimately don’t know how to streamline efficiencies that will save them money down the road.

In our first post for “Evaluating Your Process for Users of Deltek Costpoint or a Similar System,” I’ll examine the role of an AR clerk with my ‘piece of cake’ attempt at automating bill routing.

I had bills created from our ERP and I had Outlook, so I sent two bills to their respective approvers to verify hours were correct so we could bill the services to the client. Then I waited and waited and waited and waited… you get the picture. I followed up via email at least three times over the next week and finally, a week later, I knocked on their doors to see if they had time to review the email I sent.

‘Approver 1′ called me to his desk and had me look at the count of emails in his inbox. Until then, I was unaware that this number could go over 9,999, but there it was. I apologized and helped him find my email. Five minutes later he reviewed it and sent me an email saying we could bill it. Finally, the bill was out the door. I don’t remember whether I had to mail it or email it, but that is of no consequence. Oh, and of course, I forgot to tell my supervisor that I got the bill out the door so she was unnecessarily on my case the next morning.  I’ll try not to make that mistake again.

‘Approver 2′ (let’s call her Amy), asked if I had received her email. She said she responded immediately to each of the messages I sent, so I crept back to my cube and found her responses.  Suddenly I was the culprit in slowing down my own process! “Sorry, this Acme project isn’t mine,” she said. “These should go to Janet, she runs the Acme project.” Ugh! Wouldn’t you know she didn’t even have the courtesy to copy Janet on her response to me. So I just trudged down the hall to Janet’s office and had her review the paper copy. She looked at it briefly and said “yep, looks fine.” Great, I was out her door and happy to get the bill out of the door. Never mind that I forgot to get Janet to initial the invoice to indicate she had approved it and, of course, I forgot to tell my supervisor I sent the bill.  But, hey…bill is out the door, case closed.

Actually, the case was just getting started. The following week, in walks my supervisor. “I got a call from Acme Company’s CFO.  She asked me who Francis Miller was and why we were billing Acme for her travel to Las Vegas.  When I look in our system, this bill isn’t even posted, when did you send it out? Did you get Amy to review and approve this before you sent it out?” Sorry, I said, I forgot to post the bill in the system, and Amy said the project really belongs to Janet, so I got her to review and approve it…..see (as I pulled my copy from the file drawer). But, of course, Janet’s initials weren’t there.  Now my boss is mad at me for sending out an invoice that she thinks I didn’t get reviewed AND I forgot to post it. Swell.

I realized there was A LOT of room for improvement in this process. Problem #1, people are swarmed with email. Problem #2, people change roles and responsibilities a lot. Problem #3, no coordination with the ERP and the approval activities.  Problem #4, I can be my own worst enemy. Why couldn’t all this stuff be linked together somehow, and why isn’t there a way to get things posted in the system without me having to remember every little thing. I’m only human, after all. And this was a simple bill.  I could only imagine – or rather didn’t want to in this case – what would have happened if there had been revisions.

From experience I’ve gathered intelligence on how to sidestep these common pitfalls. Apart from working together as a team, companies always think in terms of making changes to their IT infrastructure. What I believe needs to happen is approaching these pitfalls in terms of changing the process infrastructure. There are no short term ‘quick fix’ changes, but rather logical steps toward automating manual processes that run at the heart of their businesses.Workflow

Step 1

Get people out of email and into a single system for approvals. This will help solve problem #1 and 3. By logging in to a single system for approvals, the approver should be able to get to a “To Do” list that helps them focus on the task(s) at hand. A system that alerts ONLY when an approval is required, and only when this task is “past due,” can assist in decreasing problem #1.

Step 2

Link your system to Deltek Costpoint or a similar platform! Not only does it save time from transferring information into Outlook, but it also ensures that the information will not be incorrectly entered or failed to be entered. Additionally, users can maintain project leads in Costpoint, and can link to a user in the system to automatically assign the approver to the person(s) involved in any given approval process. Problems #2 and 3 solved.

Step 3

Create a workflow that allows for rework, rejection, and handles the issues and items that may need to be addressed when something is “wrong.” That way, the stakeholders that need to be involved can be included automatically based on roles, or by selecting a user from a list of possible issues/departments involved. This decreases the amount of emails sent out for approvals. Assigning a task and automating reminders in the system accomplishes all these things.

Step 4

Solve Problem #4.  Remove yourself from your enemy list.  Relax. Stay out of email. Work on other things. Seriously. At a recent conference I attended, it was estimated that we spend around 28 percent of our work time sending or reading emails. What happens when you remove a single work stream worth of emails from your list of things to do? You can get back a piece of that time to work on other more pressing issues.

If it sounds like I’ve been through this process at least a few times, it’s because I have. Using the power of a business process management tool called Integrify, NeoSystems has automated this and other processes and tied those processes to Costpoint and similar platforms. Throughout this series, I will highlight the ways we have implemented, envisioned, and produced time-saving, compliance-driven processes that integrate with your ERP to create an Enhanced Workflow Automation Framework.

Have burning questions about Process Automation? Feel free to contact me ahead of next week’s blog post.

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Beyond Compliance: How Energy Management Adds Outstanding Value

February 16th, 2016 | Posted by Allison Gilmore in Guest Blogs - (Comments Off)

This week on NVTC’s blog, Michael Canes, senior consultant at LMI, shares why smart energy usage fundamentally improves the way companies do business, and the five steps agencies can take to help their energy management.

energy

Today’s government facility energy managers face the enormous challenge of meeting goals set through legislation and executive order (EO). For the past several years, managers have needed to increase the energy efficiency of buildings by 3 percent annually. But now, agencies also must utilize increasing proportions of renewable energy, 30 percent or more by 2025.

Meeting these benchmarks is necessary to comply with legislation, or EOs, but progressive agencies know that smart energy usage fundamentally improves the way they do business. Operating more efficiently increases program effectiveness.

We follow a five-step approach to help agencies improve energy management:

1. Assess current energy consumption
2. Identify opportunities to improve efficiency and add renewables
3. Analyze the economics of the alternatives
4. Budget and manage the finances of energy investments
5. Ensure the investments are in compliance with applicable environmental standards.

We analyzed alternate means to curb fuel consumption for the U.S. military’s theater of operation, reducing resources needed to supply fuel over hundreds of miles of terrain. Energy efficiency freed up vital resources to be used for other mission-oriented purposes, creating savings in fuel, equipment, and manpower; and increasing operational effectiveness.We currently are working with the Facilities Management and Engineering Directorate at U.S. Customs and Border Protection to provide consistent, up-to-date guidance on how to mesh legal mandates with Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standards to assure sustainability measures are of value to the government.The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) publishes an annual energy scorecard detailing federal agencies’ progress towards federal benchmarks. The most recent report shows that, while some agencies are progressing, others are lagging behind. The challenge to gain greater energy efficiency can be met, but it requires thorough assessment, a detailed plan of attack, and continuous implementation efforts.For more information, check out LMI’s book A Federal Leader’s Guide to Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), which equips federal leaders with a succinct guide to specific energy issues in the federal government—the nation’s largest consumer of energy.

Michael Canes, PhD, is an internationally recognized economist with an extensive background in the economics of energy and climate policy. He has published a number of studies related to energy economics and policy. His PhD in economics is from the University of California, Los Angeles.

 

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Legislative Update: What’s the Status of Tech Legislation in Richmond

February 11th, 2015 | Posted by Allison Gilmore in About NVTC | Advocacy | Membership - (Comments Off)

NVTC provides Northern Virginia’s technology business community with a strong, proactive political advocacy presence in Richmond to help ensure that state policies and investments represent the priorities of NVTC member companies and foster a pro-business environment that is supportive of the technology industry and technology-based economic growth. NVTC’s public policy team has been in Richmond throughout this legislative session, focusing on key legislation of value to our members.

Feb. 10 marked crossover at the General Assembly, the deadline for each chamber to act on its own bills. Crossover not only marks the mid-point of the legislative session, but also gives a clear look at legislation that was approved by at least one chamber as well as legislation that will not move forward this session. Check out NVTC’s Crossover Report for summaries and status updates on legislation of interest to Northern Virginia’s technology community.

We welcome feedback on these and other legislative issues relevant to our members. Contact NVTC’s public policy team at any time with questions, ideas or suggestions:

  • NVTC Vice President of Policy Josh Levi (jlevi@nvtc.org 703-904-7878 x214)
  • NVTC Public Policy Manager Troy Murphy (tmurphy@nvtc.org 703-904-7878 x 218)

For more information about NVTC’s advocacy efforts, visit www.nvtc.org/advocacy and follow us on Twitter @NVTCTechPolitic.

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Contribute to the NVTC Blog!

October 22nd, 2014 | Posted by Allison Gilmore in About NVTC | Member Blog Posts | Social Media - (Comments Off)

NVTC welcomes member submissions for guest blog posts. There is no suggested word count and posts do NOT need to be original content (i.e. they can be excerpted or summarized from other authored material coming out of your company). Guest blog posts should offer information and thought leadership, and must NOT be promotional.

The best blog posts incorporate lists, graphics and/or photos, and include links to supplemental information and a concise headline. Check out this example. (Note: This post plugs a product, but only because the product is the source of the information the blog author is providing us.)

With limited editorial space (usually one or two guest posts a week), we urge you to reach out to us with your proposed submission in advance (especially if it’s time sensitive or needs to be coordinated with an event). NVTC’s editorial staff will select an appropriate date for publication of each guest post, and reserves the right to make suggestions for edits to a post before publication.

To share your insights with NVTC’s readers, contact Sarah Jones at sjones@nvtc.org or 703-268-7878 ext. 207.

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Save Thousands on Recruiting Costs with NoVaTechVets!

October 10th, 2014 | Posted by Allison Gilmore in About NVTC | Membership | Veterans - (Comments Off)

As a benefit of NVTC membership, all NVTC member companies get the following veteran recruiting tools for FREE through the NVTC Veterans Employment Initiative:

  • Job Ad Postings – Post an unlimited number of job ad postings on www.novatechvets.org. Jobs can be posted individually or scraped from your existing job board. NVTC members’ job postings will reach an expanded audience through U.S. Tech Vets, the online community we launched in January 2014 with Monster, the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) and 10 other national technology associations, since jobs posted to www.novatechvets.org site are cross-posted on U.S. TePicture1ch Vets.
  • Veteran Resumes – Search the nation’s largest veteran resume database of more than 970,000 resumes.  NoVaTechVets provides employers access to nearly twice as many resumes in its veteran resume database than available through other veteran job boards.
  • Better Site Functionality NoVaTechVets leverages Monster Power Resume Search technology, a unique, award winning technology that enables recruiters find the right candidate with the right skills faster than traditional keyword search tools found in most veteran job board.  This can cut the time to find the right candidate by as much as 40% over other job search tools.
  • Resources and Training – With NoVaTechVets, recruiters can participate in monthly training through live web conference where they can hone their online search skills. Upcoming training webinars are scheduled for Oct. 16, Nov. 20 and Dec. 11 at 1:30 p.m. Eastern. (Email veterans@nvtc.org to recieve dial in information.) NoVaTechVets also provides free access to recruiter research library containing helpful instructional videos and other information.

An NVTC member buying unlimited veteran job postings and a single nationwide veteran resume search license from one of the top five veteran job boards could expect to pay between $8,000 and $18,000 depending on features.

Note: This price range includes just one recruiter resume search license. With NoVaTechVets, your company can have multiple recruiter accounts/veteran resume search licenses. For many NVTC members, especially for small and medium sized businesses, the money you can save in veteran recruiting expenses equals more than your annual member dues.

Don’t wait to take advantage of this valuable NVTC member benefit! Sign up for a recruiter account today!

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Determining the Value of Your Technology Company: It’s A Sticky Situation

June 9th, 2014 | Posted by Allison Gilmore in Guest Blogs | Uncategorized - (Comments Off)

NVTC is inviting members and industry leaders to serve as guest bloggers, sharing insights and information on trends or business issues relevant to other members. In his second post on the NVTC blog, Matt Rajput of CohnReznick shares his insights on new methods for valuing technology companies.

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As the IPO market continues to churn and with plenty of money on the sidelines, could it be that investors are changing their models for valuing a technology company?

In recent years, a company’s top line revenue and projected growth carried significant weight in attracting interest from investors as evidenced by valuation multiples of 5x, 10x, even 20x. However, we’ve recently seen that an increasing number of investors are taking a closer look at “marginal gross margins,” which is defined as a new dollar of revenue minus the cost of producing that revenue as the company grows.   Simply put, this measurement identifies the cost incurred in earning another dollar of revenue.

Calculating marginal gross margins has become a more popular method of calculating the value of a technology company because it is considered a cleaner look at operational efficiency, which is often challenging to measure in acquisitory companies that actively buy customers and market share to drive growth.  Some investors feel that buying customers and market share through acquisitions is not a favorable long term strategy for solid growth.  What happens when customers become more challenging to find and the next couple of deals fall through?

To me, it doesn’t make sense for investors to acquire a company that spends a dollar to earn a dollar in revenue, even if revenues increase by millions of dollars resulting in impressive top-line results.  A few months back, the $19B valuation of WhatsApp seemed outrageous to some, but when industry analysts began to dig deeper into the numbers, it came to light that WhatsApp had a very high operating gross margin. Coupled with its ability to grow as a cutting-edge technology, the sustaining membership revenue cash flow, and the sizable market cap, this valuation seems more reasonable.  WhatsApp passed the sticky test with flying colors!

Stickiness usually leads to higher gross margins.  The better that a technology company can become engaged with its current client base, the greater the opportunity for increasing gross margins and in turn the more positive an impact on the valuation of the company.  So, as an alternative strategy to building value, technology company decision-makers may want to think twice about buying that next customer or company and instead develop new and engaging products and services that contribute to the organic growth of their customer base.

If you’re a technology investor or a technology company decision maker, I’d be interested to hear your thoughts.

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Matt Rajput, CPA, is an Audit Manager with CohnReznick LLP and a member of the firm’s Technology Industry Practice. Working from the firm’s Tysons Corner office, Matt has eight+ years of experience servicing publicly-traded and closely-held companies in the technology sector and he routinely provides services to private equity and venture capital backed companies. Contact Matt at matt.rajput@cohnreznick.com.

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Considerations for a Cybersecure Network

June 8th, 2014 | Posted by Allison Gilmore in Guest Blogs - (Comments Off)

NVTC is inviting members and industry leaders to serve as guest bloggers, sharing insights and information on trends or business issues relevant to other members. In the below post, David Farmer of member company Environics Communications shares cybersecurity advice for companies and their CIOs. This blog was originally posted June 2, 2014, on the Environics Communications blog.

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According to CNN Money, half of American adults have been hacked this year.  That is a frightening statistic, especially since the year is not even half over.  Virtually every day a new cyberbreach is exposed, increasing risks associated with everything from conducting transactions in-person and online to ongoing national security efforts designed to protect Americans.

Last week at the Hub, Environics Communications sponsored a panel on which several cyberexperts shared valuable insights for CIOs to consider as they deploy their various networks.  The Hub is a networking organization that inspires ideas by connecting leaders in the technology communications industry with one another for business development, innovation and insights.  Cyberindustry expert Jason Gayl of Cyber Capital Partners moderated the panel.  Panelists included Chris Kauffman of Personam, Christopher Garcia of Calibre, Brett Wilson of Cyren and Kevin Jones of Thycotic.  Each company offers unique solutions to help organizations better protect their networks against cyberthreats.

One key take-away from the discussion is that companies need to properly prioritize their cybersecurity efforts in order to ensure adequate protection from cyberthreats.  Such prioritization must be done carefully after performance of a risk-based network assessment.  A prudent first step is to consider what is typical in your sector, and then determine how to do it better.  Since decisions made at this point will identify the required internal and external resources (and therefore budget allocation), it is imperative to make sure priorities are actionable and implementable.

Companies must also be sure to account for insider threat possibilities as they continue to be one of the largest opportunities for security breaches, whether intentional or accidental.  Insiders are integrated into an organization’s culture, and they know what the most valuable data is and where it is stored.  Therefore, insiders can cause more damage more rapidly than an external hacker.  Typically, malware does not identify insider threats, so CIOs should explore the growing field of insider-threat detection technology.  Since their job is to protect the network, CIOs must weigh the potential cost of stolen data against the potential HR liability stemming from insider threat detection.

CIOs sometimes have a thankless job.  When all is well, their effort is taken for granted.  The minute something goes wrong, CIOs become the center of attention.  Budget constraints are not an acceptable reason to fail to deliver the security required to protect an organization or business.  CEOs need to keep cybersecurity top of mind when it comes to considering the technology, resources, and budget CIOs need to deliver the security required.  Failing to employ the right cybersecurity tools and procedures has enormous implications to the long-term viability of an organization.

CEOs and their respective communications officers must be forthcoming when a cyberbreach occurs.  It is important to learn from recent examples where major corporations suffered breaches of their electronic payment systems and online shopping networks.  Being proactive in informing the public what a company does and does not know will earn favor from its customers.  Not sharing information about the breach instills a lack of trust among customers and can be detrimental to business and profits.  Communications officers must be ready to share information quickly, even if one does not have all the answers.  In such an instance, it is ok to let the public know when you expect to have more information.

One way to stay informed on the latest cybersecurity advancements is by attending industry events on the subject. Additionally, blogs published by some of the panelist companies mentioned above also offer some guidance: Cyren Security Blog and Thycotic Blog.

_____________________________________________________________________________________

David Farmer is with Environics Communications, a mid-sized, full-service marketing communications firm.  He has 25 years of corporate communications and marketing experience in the technology sector with a track record of producing results for domestic and international telecommunications, security, and information technology companies serving business, consumer and government clients.  He has broad experience in strategic planning, corporate communications, messaging, public relations, marketing, product management, mergers and acquisitions.  In addition, David is actively involved with NVTC. 

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When Vision is Not Enough

March 18th, 2014 | Posted by Allison Gilmore in Member Blog Posts - (Comments Off)

NVTC is inviting members to serve as guest bloggers, sharing insights and information on trends or business issues relevant to other members. Kathy Stershic of member company Dialog Research & Communications shares her insights below.


A clear organizational vision is vital to moving your people in the same direction to meet strategic goals. Attaining a vision supposes a lot of things going right along your journey, or at least being somewhat in your control – but what happens when inconvenient realities make things go, well, differently?

Many of today’s leaders simply lack the time, bandwidth or vantage point to think beyond the near term. Yet never-ending change makes it increasingly important to examine macro forces that can impact your customers’ environments, and to prepare yourself for flexible decision-making in an unexpected future.

Scenario planning is a powerful but often overlooked tool in strategic planning. Scenarios don’t define the most likely future – they map uncertainties and explore alternative futures, so you are better prepared for both.

While employed by organizations as large as Royal Dutch Shell, the World Bank and the Military, even smaller to mid-sized businesses can incorporate at least some foundational work into their planning efforts.

The biggest premise in scenario planning is don’t assume the future will closely mirror the present. [Consider the unanticipated changes that resulted from the 1970s oil shock, the ripple effects of the 9/11 attacks or even the recent Target data breach.] Start outside-in. Invest in truly understanding your customer’s world – what are they planning for? What external forces must they anticipate or react to? Such forces can be the root of opportunities, surprises, or unforeseen crises.

Then shift to inside-out thinking to assess the implications of those external forces on your core business practices, organizational capacity, culture and current strategies. Develop a set of plausible ‘what if’ scenarios grounded in your customers’ contextual environment. Explore postures such as…

  • Does our current [intended] strategy hold up in each scenario? What are our strengths and weaknesses in each situation?
  • In 3 years, will there still be a fit between what we do and the customer environment?
  • Who or what kind of businesses will be successful in each scenario?
  • Can we be reasonably sure a certain change will occur? What could the outcome of that change be on our customers?  And what then is truly uncertain? What should we do or not do in each scenario?

Brainstorm, be creative, and stretch your thinking. A recent customer of mine reacted to our example scenarios as “mind bending” for the entrenched organizational culture. Generate options and test them against your scenarios. You can use a variety of tools – from team brainstorming workshops to highly structured analytical modeling.

Remember this is about plausibility, not prediction. But with this more informed perspective, you can design a strategic roadmap with enough flexibility to navigate unexpected turns. Then go for it.

For further reading: http://hbr.org/2013/05/living-in-the-futures/ar/1


Contributed by Kathy Stershic, Principal Consultant, Dialog Research & Communications

www.dialogrc.com, kstershic@dialogrc.com

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Helping Veterans and Companies Innovate

January 8th, 2014 | Posted by Allison Gilmore in Veterans - (Comments Off)

NVTC partners with CEA and national technology associations to launch USTechVets.org

NVTC President and CEO Bobbie Kilberg speaks at the U.S. Tech Vets launch in Las Vegas on Jan. 8, 2014.

NVTC President and CEO Bobbie Kilberg speaks at the U.S. Tech Vets launch in Las Vegas on Jan. 8, 2014.

When we launched the NVTC Veterans Employment Initiative in August 2013, at an event that included supporting remarks from Gov. Bob McDonnell and Sen. Mark Warner, our goal was to support our member companies in their efforts to hire, train and retain qualified veteran employees. The NVTC Veterans Employment Initiative is about bringing together the technology business community with academic institutions and policymakers to create an ecosystem where veterans’ valuable skills and talents are matched to private sector needs.

Our member companies believe overall workforce development is one of the greatest long-term challenges facing our technology community. Over the last six months, hundreds of NVTC members have signed on to the Initiative because they recognize that veterans have tremendously valuable skills and experience, such as leadership, teamwork, self-discipline, problem-solving, quick-thinking and experience working in a mission-focused environment.

Now, we’re delighted to be partnering with Monster, the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) and 10 other national technology associations to expand this effort nationally, with the goal of connecting thousands more veterans with jobs in the technology sector. Launched today at the 2014 International CES in Las Vegas, U.S. Tech Vets expands upon NVTC’s online resource and job board, with the addition of jobs from 10 other national technology associations. NVTC member companies will see their jobs reaching an expanded audience through this new site, since jobs posted to NVTC’s www.novatechvets.org site will be cross posted on the new site…for FREE!

There’s never been a better time to get involved in the NVTC Veterans Employment Initiative. Find out more at www.nvtc.org/veterans or email us at veterans@nvtc.org.

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New Opportunities in 2014

January 7th, 2014 | Posted by Allison Gilmore in Uncategorized - (Comments Off)

It’s 2014 and the NVTC team is excited to kick off a new year of connecting, educating and advocating for the technology community in Northern Virginia. We have several new programs and initiatives in the works to support our members as they develop their businesses and seek new partners in the coming year.

Beginning in February, we’ll be kicking off a series of monthly coffees for new members to meet face-to-face while learning more about what NVTC has to offer from staff and long-time, active members. These New Member Coffees will take place the first Friday of each month at the CIT building in Herndon. Whether you just joined this month or last year, consider joining us to develop some new connections and make the most out of your NVTC membership in 2014. Contact Ann Corcoran at acorcoran@nvtc.org to learn more.

On March 5, the NVTC Veterans Employment Initiative will host a workshop based on the Virginia Values Veterans (V3) program to help companies in the region learn how to find, train and retain veteran employees. Participants will learn valuable tips to tap into the highly qualified veteran workforce to give their companies the edge in 2014. And stay tuned for more resources and programs from the Initiative, including the national expansion of NVTC’s veteran job board and online community, novatechvets.org.

These are just two examples of some of our new programs and services for 2014, all of which will build upon our long history of providing valuable benefits to our members and serving as the voice of the region’s technology community. As the year goes on, let us know how we can continue to serve you. You can reach us at 703-904-7878 or nvtc@nvtc.org.

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