Author Archives: Alexa Magdalenski

Get a Sneak Preview of the Capital Health Tech Summit!

May 18th, 2017 | Posted by Alexa Magdalenski in Capital Health Tech Summit - (Comments Off)

Final Logo Capital Health Tech Summit NVTC (2)Explore how technology is transforming and disrupting the delivery of health at the inaugural Capital Health Tech Summit on June 15, 2017 at the Inova Center for Personalized Health.

The Capital Health Tech Summit will showcase how the intersection of commercial, government and academic assets makes Greater Washington the epicenter for innovation and opportunity in the health technology sector. Keynote speakers include Senator Tim Kaine, ONC National Coordinator for Health Information Technology Dr. Don Rucker and University of Virginia Executive Vice President of Health Affairs Dr. Richard Shannon.

The Summit will cover such exciting health tech topics as data analytics in the continuum of health, cybersecurity, pharmacogenomics, telehealth and remote patient monitoring.

Just this week new speakers from Carilion Clinic, FDA, HHS and Translational Software have joined the Summit lineup. We’re adding new speakers everyday so check the Capital Health Tech Summit agenda often!

Learn more about the Summit in our new preview video!

 

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Why the Cybersecurity Executive Order is Important

May 17th, 2017 | Posted by Alexa Magdalenski in Guest Blogs | Member Blog Posts - (Comments Off)

This week’s NVTC member guest blog is by Telos Corporation CEO and Chairman and NVTC Board Member John B. Wood. Telos Corporation is an information technology leader that offers solutions to empower and protect the world’s most security-conscious enterprises.


telos-logoWith the May 11 signing of the “Presidential Executive Order on Strengthening the Cybersecurity of Federal Networks and Critical Infrastructure,” our nation took a major step forward in improving our overall cyber posture.

As I said in the hours after the President signed the order, even the most rigorous processes for managing modern cyber threats require a foundation of modern technology. That’s why I was encouraged to see that the executive order specifically instructed federal agencies to show preference in their procurement for shared IT services, including the cloud. A growing number of federal agencies have realized that the cloud offers them secure and cost-efficient computing capabilities, but many others have been hesitant to make the move. This executive order provides the needed boost for all agencies to look towards the cloud.

With this executive order and the latest version of the Modernizing Government Technology Act (MGT) legislation moving through Congress, I believe we have reached a tipping point where the federal government will have the White House support and the financial means to truly tackle IT modernization and make it a top area of focus for every agency. In unveiling the order, the White House also showed vision by saying that planned federal IT modernization will include transitioning agencies to one or more consolidated networks, with the goal being to view “our IT as one federal enterprise network.”

Another very interesting aspect of the order, which I was likewise encouraged to see, was the direction for all federal agencies to immediately begin to use the NIST Cybersecurity Framework (CSF) to manage their cybersecurity risk.  At Telos, we have long advocated for a common language when it comes to cybersecurity so stakeholders in all areas of the organization can communicate about cyber risk, which ultimately leads to more informed decisions about what security investments need to be made. The CSF is a powerful framework for enabling improved risk management throughout the government enterprise. Replacing outdated legacy systems, and making adoption of the framework more efficient with automation, will only strengthen our government’s cybersecurity defenses.

In the near-term, I will be paying close attention as agencies work to provide their own 90-day plans for implementing the NIST CSF, as required by this executive order.

Locally, this order should be welcome news to the vast number of technology and cybersecurity companies in Northern Virginia who work with the federal government. For those of us in this field, the executive order is exactly the type of nudge that federal agencies have needed to make the necessary improvements to their IT infrastructure and cybersecurity posture. However, for this executive order to truly deliver value, it will be contingent upon industry and government working together. I have no doubt that industry will step up to ensure success.

Overall, the cybersecurity executive order constitutes a long-overdue move by the federal government to take the steps necessary to better protect its networks and data. Moreover, the order sends a powerful message that our nation’s cyber defenses must continuously be monitored, evaluated and improved, and that this effort will be a key priority for this administration over the coming months and years.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Over 100 members of the NVTC Data Center and Cloud Infrastructure Committee attended a special tour of DigitalRealty’s Ashburn campus on May 4. Attendees also enjoyed a networking reception after the tour. Thank you to event host and new patron sponsor DigitalRealty! DigitalRealty’s campus is one million square feet and growing fast!

Check out photos from the event (click to enlarge)!

May 4 event photo 3  May 4 event photo 4  May 4 event photo 5 May 4 event photo 6  May 4 event photo 7  May 4 event photo 8 May 4 event photo 9 May 4 event photo 2 May 4 event photo 1

Stay in the loop! Follow the Data Center and Cloud Infrastructure Committee on Twitter!

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

A Manager’s Guide to Matching Employees with the Right Mentors

May 5th, 2017 | Posted by Alexa Magdalenski in Guest Blogs | Human Resources | Member Blog Posts - (Comments Off)

Does your organization have a mentoring program? Have a well-structured employee mentoring program in place is a vital component to the mentoring experience. Read on for important tips from Insperity for shaping your organization’s mentoring program.


insperity v2Mentorship can play a critical role in the successful onboarding of new employees and the long-term development of existing team members. But how do you determine the right mentor for a particular mentee?

Should they be like-minded or in similar roles? Or, should the mentor be strong in the skills that the employee needs the most growth in? What role does personality fit play?

First, a definition: A mentor is not another boss, but a helpful confidant who gives relevant, occasional feedback and guidance that helps the employee gain needed skills.

Mentoring is different from performance management. A mentor program targets those employees who are already performing well and need extra input to grow and reach their full potential.

Mentoring is not remedial learning. If an employee is underperforming or has some other workplace problem, their manager must tackle the issue through coaching and other performance management techniques, not by selecting a mentor.

Know what you want to accomplish

The type of mentor you choose for an employee depends on your business goals. Does the employee in question need help with technical skills or leadership skills? Is this a new employee or a long-term employee?

You first need to know what you want to accomplish to successfully pair a mentor and mentee.

For instance, a new employee will probably benefit from a mentor who helps them learn about your business’s cultural norms and processes. This mentor should have an open mind and an open ear to candidly speak about processes and the best ways to navigate the environment.

They should also be experienced and organized enough to explain key procedures, and communicate clearly and consistently.

On the other hand, if you’ve identified a junior machinist who needs to learn a particular technical skill, you’ll want to pick a mentor who has that skill and who also communicates well.

If a junior executive wants to become a senior executive, the mentor should be able to offer guidance on cultural norms and processes, look for ways the mentee’s potential can benefit the organization and facilitate getting the mentee connected to these new opportunities.

A mentor should have the necessary communication skills and desire to be a continual learner, not someone with a tired or know-it-all attitude. Mentors should also be willing to share ownership and accountability for the work, giving the mentee credit when it’s due. Remember, mentoring is a two-way street, so pick a mentor who is willing to listen, give good counsel and learn from their mentee.

Another aspect of that two-way street: Not all mentors have to be older, long-time employees. Maybe one of your younger employees can help an older one gain confidence in using new software or social media for work or offer up-to-date information on the latest business technologies and workplace trends.

Yes, pairing employees with similar viewpoints, life experiences and work styles may help the relationship succeed, but ultimately the match should be determined by your organization’s needs.

Success requires structure

Larger companies often build significant structure around their mentor programs, with formal pairings, training and reporting required. That sort of structure may not be practical for a smaller business, but to be successful your mentor program will still need some definition.

What that structure looks like will be determined by the business goals you identified earlier. But, you still need to define goals, expectations and schedules. You also need to make sure both the mentor and mentee have time to accomplish the goals you set.

For example, if the mentee needs to gain technical expertise, the mentorship may consist of the mentor teaching specific skills and the mentee practicing at consistent times followed by question-and-answer periods. A mentor-mentee pairing like this may only last a few weeks or months, with a clearly defined goal that technical expertise will be attained by a certain date.

Follow-up is important too. Ask questions such as:

  • Did the mentorship help you learn that new skill or refine an existing skill?
  • Did the program help you get more comfortable in your new job?
  • Was it a good use of your time?
  • Do you feel better prepared to handle the work ahead?

Answers to these questions will help you determine whether your mentor-mentee pairs are a good fit. If they’re not, don’t hesitate to break up a pair and reassign them to other people. Mentor pairs are as individual as the people involved, and not everyone will be compatible.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Spotlight on Workforce Innovations: Business-Higher Education Forum

May 2nd, 2017 | Posted by Alexa Magdalenski in Workforce - (Comments Off)

By John Shaw, NVTC Research and Strategic Initiatives Manager

In a continued effort to address the talent needs of NVTC members and the Greater Washington technology community, NVTC’s Tech Talent Initiative (TTI) is partnering with the Business-Higher Education Forum (BHEF) to address the development of cybersecurity, data analytics and engineering competencies through curriculum that aligns with the skills used by government and industry practitioners, amongst other activities.

BHEF’s work focuses on three main approaches: building partnerships, strengthening talent initiatives, and identifying actionable trends and insights.

Through this multi-pronged approach, BHEF uses evidenced-based practices to meet business’ needs, correcting misalignments in a region’s workforce through strengthening efforts to develop highly-skilled, engaged professionals. These regional talent pathways help create undergraduate programs that produce a diverse pool of enabled, workforce-ready graduates with the right skills and competencies for today’s high-skill jobs.

In Greater Washington, BHEF has created the Future Cyber Leaders Program, which brings together defense sector industry leaders and government agencies to select undergrads from sponsoring defense sector organizations to participate in a seven-week program focused on cybersecurity development. BHEF has also applied its National Higher Education Workforce Initiative across Greater Washington (HEWI), and has published a case study on their work in Maryland, which shows clear results in moving the needle in developing graduates that have the needed skills and competencies to enter the cybersecurity workforce upon graduation.

NVTC’s partnership with BHEF is one part of their HEWI work in Greater Washington, and will focus on competency mapping in data analytics, cybersecurity and engineering. NVTC is taking on the role of convener, and is currently gathering practitioners for two roundtables during which practitioners will review and update existing straw man competency maps specific to data analytics and engineering, as well as cybersecurity and engineering. The data analytics and engineering session is scheduled for Wednesday, May 10 from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. in Reston, Va., and the cybersecurity and engineering session is scheduled for Wednesday, May 24, also from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. in Reston, Va. For more information on these sessions or to participate, please contact me by clicking here: John Shaw.

We are also staging an Internship Roundtable for Emerging and Technology Fields on Wednesday, June 7 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., again in Reston, Va. This session will address how developing early professional relationships with students can give companies a competitive advantage in building a qualified workforce and will help NVTC and BHEF develop best practices for recruiting, mentoring, hiring and retaining students in high-demand tech fields. For more information or to participate for the internship roundtable, please contact me by clicking here: John Shaw.

Click here to learn more about NVTC’s Tech Talent Initiative and here to access BHEF’s published content.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Greater Washington is a Model for Tomorrow in Next-Gen IT

April 21st, 2017 | Posted by Alexa Magdalenski in Titans - (Comments Off)

1704 Titans Larry Prior 435a (2)On April 7, over 400 members of the region’s technology community came together at The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner for an NVTC Titans breakfast featuring Larry Prior, president and CEO of CSRA, a leading provider of next-generation IT solutions and professional services for U.S. government agencies and programs.

Prior highlighted the “fundamental refresh” occurring in tech today, being driven by demand for the cloud and processing capabilities at the edge. This next-gen IT revolution isn’t just happening in the commercial sector; government clients are also expecting automated workflow and agile network systems that function like the apps on their personal devices.

Prior also discussed  last year’s merger between CSC and SRA to form CSRA. He shared how the merger has allowed CSRA to scale its business to meet the government’s IT needs. Through increased financial investments in R&D, leveraging a newly-expanded talent pool and bolstering partnerships, CSRA has been able to scale its business. Prior also noted how consolidations and mergers are becoming a more common trend in the tech industry.

Scaling is happening at a regional level in Greater Washington, too, according to Prior. The region’s strengths in partnership-building, collaboration, commitment to mission and passion for customers gives organizations here a strong foundation and competitive advantage, particularly with government customers. Prior noted that Greater Washington is a “model for tomorrow” in improving technology and impacting change on a national level.

Check out video of Prior’s remarks:

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

5 Things You Should Do When Migrating to the Cloud

April 12th, 2017 | Posted by Alexa Magdalenski in Cloud | Guest Blogs | Member Blog Posts - (Comments Off)

Interested in transitioning to the cloud? Wondering where to start? Then you’ll want to read this NVTC member guest blog from LeaseWeb’s Julia Gortinskaya first to get prepared for your cloud transition.


leaseweb-logoFrom both a business and an IT perspective, migrating to the cloud can be a good option for many businesses. But, it’s not something that can be done without the right research and preparation. If you want to be successful when migrating to the cloud, you need open communication with both your own team and hosting provider, as well as a clearly defined cloud migration strategy that is connected to your business needs. What follow are five tips to help you get started:

1. Share your roadmap

Setting goals is everything. Your goals for migrating to the cloud should be closely connected to your business goals. How fast do you want to grow (i.e. how scalable does your technology need to be)? Who in your organization needs what functionality in order to reach which goal?

Select a cloud partner who is open to discussion about your roadmap and its implementation. Together you can create a technology roadmap that best supports your ambitions. Ideally, your cloud partner is a trusted advisor who shares his or her expertise with you. Keeping in close contact with your partner and sharing the load will also enable you to divide tasks between you: while your cloud provider focuses on hosting a cloud platform and making sure your servers are up-and-running, you will be able to concentrate on creating more value for your customers.

The value of leveraging a third party can only be achieved when both sides understand their responsibilities and expectations. This means communication between you and your partner should be one of your top priorities.

2. Check certifications and compliance statements

Security and compliance are enablers, not obstacles. When migrating to the cloud, it is important to know in advance which certifications your cloud partner has, what exactly is covered and the independent auditor monitoring process. For instance, privacy and compliance certifications are necessary for organizations supporting compliant workloads.

Since security and compliance are shared responsibilities between you and your cloud provider, and perhaps other third parties as well, you’ll likely be able to benefit from the certifications your cloud provider already has in place. If your enterprise data is stored on servers in a datacenter owned by your cloud provider, the physical security of the datacenter is the cloud partner’s responsibility.

Make sure to find answers to questions such as ‘who has access to my data?’, ‘where is my data stored geographically?’ and ‘what are the export restrictions?’ You may prefer to store data in a specific region, but may also be bound to a location by customer contracts and/or privacy laws.

And don’t forget, certifications and regulations evolve over time. Cloud providers should follow developments closely and advise on any action you need to take.  While you may not want to come across as suspicious, you should ask your partner to deliver proof of any certifications.

3. Look for a partner who can scale quickly

When migrating to the cloud, there are different options and delivery models for specific workloads: private, public, hybrid, hyper-scale, on premise and off-premise. New ones are developed at a rapid pace. Explore the options (and the degree of service, the security and the expected costs) that are available for your needs.

Whichever partner you choose, select one that can act the moment you need to scale quickly. If your business requires you to add server capacity either temporarily or for a longer period, your partner should be able to provide the flexibility and speed that you need.

4. Train your people before, during and after

Most cloud projects require a different set of skills from your IT staff to implement and manage workloads (e.g. APIs, open source platforms).Traditional skill sets in server, network and desktop administration are not needed in a cloud environment as they are embedded in the service. In most instances, re-skilling employees in more DevOps centric areas can be wise.

Instead of acquiring engineering skills, your IT staff will have to learn to think more as a cloud architect (which will probably be more challenging than being an administrator anyway). And since tactical day-to-day support is managed by your cloud partner, IT staff should spend more time developing and delivering services and applications that demonstrate direct value to the business.

5. Consider changes in architecture

We have come a long way from ‘one server for one service.’ Cloud computing changes the way applications are deployed and resources are delivered. Your current architecture might work in the cloud, but may also need some changes. Some applications can be migrated to the cloud, while others might require adaptation, such as the decoupling of data. You might also benefit from taking a more service-oriented approach, from cloud services delivered through API’s. Try to design an architecture that will give you full advantage of native cloud features.

You can download the full checklist “10 Do’s and Don’ts When Migrating to the cloud” here.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

The State of Analytics in Virginia

April 6th, 2017 | Posted by Alexa Magdalenski in Big Data & Analytics | Guest Blogs | Member Blog Posts - (Comments Off)

This week’s guest blog post is by Qlarion. Qlarion helps the public sector use BI to effectively manage, access and understand information in order to make more effective business decisions. In their blog, Qlarion provides a wrap-up of NVTC’s Big Data and Analytics Committee Meeting that took place in March.


QlarionOn March 7, Qlarion’s CEO, Jake Bittner, moderated a discussion at Northern Virginia Technology Council’s (NVTC) Big Data and Analytics Committee Meeting, where Anthony (Tony) Fung, Virginia Deputy Secretary of Technology; Ernie Steidle, COO/CIO, Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services; and Anthony Wood, Program Manager, Virginia Information Technologies Agency’s Innovation Center of Excellence, shared thoughts on the challenges and opportunities related to big data and analytics in Virginia.

Deputy Secretary of Technology Tony Fung kicked off the event with a discussion of the landscape of data analytics across the Commonwealth. Deputy Secretary Fung emphasized that there have been individual analytics success stories among several state agencies and the opportunity for real progress through analytics has never been better.

Virginia now has the resources in place to implement big data and analytics programs on a large scale.

In 2016, Governor McAuliffe issued Executive Directive 7, which mandates data sharing across state agencies. Deputy Secretary Fung announced that a final report, which will provide agencies with more detail about how to comply with the directive, will be released in a few weeks.

Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services’ Ernie Steidle reported that, in addition to the executive directive, the state legislature recently passed HB 2457, which enables data sharing across Health and Human Resources agencies. The law dictates that all HHR agencies and departments, for the purpose of data sharing, be considered a single organization. Eliminating barriers between the agencies will increase efficiency and streamline services for constituents. Based on the results of the initiative, other agency groups, such as Public Safety, could adapt the same model.

The state has solidified its commitment to modernizing its technology programs by forming the Virginia Information Technologies Agency’s Innovation Center of Excellence (VITA ICE). Virginia Information Technologies Agency’s Innovation Center of Excellence’s Anthony Wood explained that VITA ICE’s primary goal is to evaluate and implement new technologies by leveraging the capabilities of Virginia’s technology companies. It’s developed a number of resources to establish relationships with Virginia tech companies.

State leadership is also intent on securing internal buy-in and educating government decision makers on the value of big data and analytics. The upcoming Governor’s Data Analytics Summit, an event exclusively for state and local government employees, will feature a lineup of speakers and panelists who will discuss how agencies can overcome challenges and achieve their goals through analytics. The event will offer actionable strategies for scoping and launching analytics projects.

This blog post originally appeared on Qlarion’s website.

Click here to learn more about the Big Data and Analytics Committee.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Big Data: An Enterprise Asset

March 24th, 2017 | Posted by Alexa Magdalenski in Capital Data Summit - (Comments Off)

The inaugural Capital Data Summit took place on Feb. 15, 2017 at The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner. Here on the NVTC blog, we continue to share content from this exciting event.


Transp Data Summit Logo - TransparentThe Summit’s Role of the CDO panel explored the role of the CDO and provided insights into how the role is evolving. Panelists discussed the adoption of big data and analytics within their respective organizations and identified obstacles that they currently are facing in the performance of their role.

Panelists included Freddie Mac Vice President of Single Family Data Delivery Services Susan Burke, HHS Office of the Inspector General Senior Advisor to the Chief Data Officer Timothy Kropp and District of Columbia Chief Data Officer Barney Krucoff. Booz Allen Principal Data Science Dr. Kirk Borne moderated.

Some of the key points that emerged from the panel included:

  • Data is an enterprise asset that must be supported by flexible architecture so it can be leveraged and utilized across different organizational teams.
  • It is a responsibility of the CDO to reduce friction that prohibits the flow of data across the enterprise and between the enterprise and the public.
  • Since data informs and drives business, many CDOs and their departments are structured under the CEO umbrella today; that doesn’t mean there aren’t strong lines of communication and partnership to the CIO umbrella.

View the full video from the Role of the CDO panel here:

CDo Panel 1 v2 CDO Panel 3 v2 CDO 22 v2

Check out the Capital Data Summit photo gallery!

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

5 Ways to Make Your Company More Appetizing to Top Talent

March 21st, 2017 | Posted by Alexa Magdalenski in Guest Blogs | Human Resources | Member Blog Posts - (Comments Off)

Does your brand have a “special sauce” for marketing and attracting new job candidates? This week’s member guest blog is by Insperity Social Media Manager, Recruiting Services, Kara Singh. Singh shares strategies for getting your company noticed in a crowded job market and recruiting top talent. 


insperity-ogIn a recent survey, more than two-thirds of hiring organizations indicated that they’re having a difficult time recruiting for job openings, according to the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM).

With a lower unemployment rate and more job openings, it’s becoming increasingly critical for employers to make sure they get noticed in the crowded job market.

Here’s how to mix up your employer brand, so it begins to stand out.

1. Create a consistent message

Your reputation is everything. You’ve heard it before. But what does that mean in the context of being an employer in a competitive job market?

It means prioritizing the special sauce that is your employer brand. Your employer brand should tell candidates why they should want to work for you.

What makes your company culture so appetizing? Why do your employees want to come to work every day? What do they look forward to? What benefits do they enjoy?

For example, you might find that employees like how your company facilitates a collaborative work environment or that they love your community involvement team activities.

As you answer these questions, you’re beginning to build your employer brand and making your company a more attractive place to work.

2. Define your company culture

Your company culture should attract the employees you want, while repelling those who don’t fit your culture.

While the bones of it should be a reflection of your company’s core mission, vision and values, it’s the real experiences of your employees that are the meat and potatoes of your culture.

That’s why you need to have a management team that walks the walk. For example, do your leaders model your values? Do your values challenge them to do their best every day?

Use employee surveys to take the temperature of your company culture and make sure it’s meeting your standards. Employee feedback can help to ensure your culture isn’t half baked.

When you feel confident that you know and understand what sets your company apart, entice job candidates by sharing the secret ingredients of your culture as you interview.

For instance, if your company places emphasis on corporate responsibility, you might ask a question that lends itself to the topic so you can integrate it naturally into the conversation. You could ask “How do you make a difference in your community?” You can follow up their response with details on how your company gives back.

By offering up these vibrant details, you can create a competitive edge in the job market as you look to fill vacant positions.

3. Define your benefits

Prospective employees want more than just a good work environment. They’re also seeking benefits that are comparable or better than what they’re receiving in their current role. This includes things like health, life and disability insurance, retirement savings plans, and paid time-off.

If you’re a smaller company, you may think you can’t compete with big company benefits. However, there are many perks you might be able to offer that bigger companies don’t.

For example, do you allow flexible work schedules or telecommuting? Do you offer on-site snacks in your break room? Do you have a job shadowing program that can help employees expand their skills?

Special perks can help set your company apart. Be sure to clearly define these extra benefits and share them with potential employees.

4. Develop employee ambassadors

With a great employer brand, company culture and employee benefits, you’d think it’d be a piece of cake finding new talent.

But the truth is that finding good people will still take work. Luckily, you can look to your current workforce for assistance.

You won’t find better ambassadors for your company than your own employees, but you’ll need to guide them to ensure they’re accurately communicating the best attributes of your brand.

To become ambassadors, your employees must be engaged in your business with a commitment to your mission, vision and values. They should easily be able to describe your culture. They should know how to pepper in the perks of their jobs.

With some basic training in these areas, you can easily empower your employees to become brand ambassadors and recruit talent from their own contacts. For example, you might have a training session for employees where you go over company talking points and how to create and manage a LinkedIn presence. Social media offers a great avenue for employees to instantly reach candidates you wouldn’t have access to otherwise.

5. Monitor your reputation on the internet

You wouldn’t expect someone to eat at a restaurant with bad reviews. Why would you expect someone to work for an employer with negative ratings?

Potential job candidates today have access to a vast amount of online information about your company before they even step foot in the door for interviews. You want to make sure this information reflects as positively as possible on your company.

With sites like Glassdoor, an online forum where former employees can describe their experiences with your company, you want to make sure you’re defending your employer brand by telling your side of the story, too. While you can’t undo criticism, you can show your transparency and willingness to listen.

For instance, did a disgruntled employee leave an unsavory comment about his or her experience? Take the time to respond publicly and show potential candidates reading it that you care.

Also, consider setting up Google Alerts to keep tabs on how your brand is represented online. Every time your company name is mentioned online, Google will send you an email alert.

Additionally, keep an eye on social media sites. There are a variety of social monitoring tools available that allow you to follow mentions of your brand.

Keep your eye on the prize

With new strategies in tow, you’re better prepared to take on the competitive landscape.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS