New TITANS logo RGB TransparentWeren’t able to make it to our Titans event in December with Rolls-Royce North America President and CEO Marion Blakey? We’ve got video recaps for you below!

In the videos you’ll hear about Blakey’s predictions for the upcoming presidential transition, get updates from Rolls-Royce North America’s Executive Vice President and General Counsel Thomas Dale on Rolls-Royce North America’s latest work in personal aircraft, hybrid electric powered planes, autonomous aircraft and how Rolls-Royce North America is collaborating with Microsoft to leverage the use of big data and the Internet of Things to reduce costs, improve performance and provide better value.

Marion Blakey, President and CEO, Rolls-Royce North America:

Thomas Dale, Executive Vice President and General Counsel, Rolls-Royce North America:

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Transp Data Summit Logo - TransparentPreparations are well underway for our inaugural Capital Data Summit taking place in just over a month on February 15, 2017 at The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner. We’re excited to share two new panel sessions just added to the Summit lineup: Big Data Applications and Big Data Centers and Identity Management in the Age of the Internet of Things.

Big Data Applications and Big Data Centers

This session brings together leading end users of big data applications from top companies to discuss the value these applications deliver to their businesses and the requirements they generate for data centers and cloud services both in Northern Virginia and globally.

Identity Management in the Age of the Internet of Things

Panelists:
Paul Grassi, Senior Standards and Technology Advisor, NIST
Matt Hummer, Director of Analytics, Govini

Moderator:
Scott McDuff, Chief Architect, Sterling Computers

We’re adding new panels and speakers every week! Keep up with all of the Capital Data Summit action on Twitter with our hashtag: #CapitalData and by following @NVTC!

View the latest Summit agenda here.

Learn more about the Summit’s in our preview video!

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Transp Data Summit Logo - TransparentJoin the region’s leading big data and analytics companies and prominent thought leaders at the 2017 Capital Data Summit on Feb. 15, 2017 at The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner.

Featuring keynotes from Clarabridge’s Sid Banerjee and Hewlett Packard Enterprise’s Meg Whitman and panels including big data experts from Capital One, District of Columbia, Goldman Sachs, IBM, Revolution Growth, Virginia Tech and more, the Capital Data Summit will provide an unprecedented opportunity to accelerate and promote the region’s data innovations, connect people, companies and academic partners, and showcase the region’s technology assets.

See the full Capital Data Summit agenda here.

Learn more about the Summit’s in our new preview video!

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Here on the NVTC blog, we continue to share content from our inaugural Capital Cybersecurity Summit that took place on Nov. 2-3, 2016 at The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner.

1021Capital Cybersecurity Summit Logo 3The 2016 Capital Cybersecurity Summit was highlighted by its keynote speakers:  Northrop Grumman Corporate Vice President and Northrop Grumman Mission Systems President Kathy Warden and RSA President Amit Yoran.

In her keynote, Warden discussed the evolution of cybersecurity as the “Fifth Domain,” a fundamental element, permeating all aspects of our daily lives. She stressed the critical need to fill cybersecurity positions in Virginia and the opportunities for public, private and academic sectors to partner together to find creative solutions to address these hiring shortages. View the full video of Warden’s remarks here:

Yoran reinforced the evolution of cybersecurity in his keynote and, like Warden, referenced the expansion of the cyber threat area into business and our daily lives. He stressed the need to develop new flexible, perimeter-less cybersecurity to meet growing threats from mobile and IoT expansion. Yoran explained that the Greater Washington region, with its unmatched research and expertise, is equipped to meet these new cyber demands. In fact, according to Yoran, the region has the potential to be “Security Valley.” View Yoran’s keynote here:

 

Lights…camera…Cybersecurity Summit! View the Summit’s photo gallery here.

What are you doing on February 15, 2017? NVTC is hosting its first-ever Capital Data Summit in Tysons Corner! Learn more!

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Here on the NVTC blog, we continue to share content from our inaugural Capital Cybersecurity Summit that took place on Nov. 2-3, 2016 at The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner.

1021Capital Cybersecurity Summit Logo 3Did you catch the Capital Cybersecurity Summit’s opening panel, Collaborating for Cyber Success? Panel participants included Invincea CEO Anup Ghosh, Forcepoint Chief Strategy Officer and President, Federal Division, Ed Hammersla and Tenable Network Security COO and Co-Founder Jack Huffard. Blue Delta Capital Partners Co-Founder Mark Frantz moderated.

The panel highlighted the exponentially beneficial cross-flow between government and commercial cybersecurity and discussed the Greater Washington region’s deep and diverse digital security assets – cutting-edge cyber products, pre-eminent talent and rich intellectual capital – that can be applied in the public and private sectors alike.

One of the reoccurring themes discussed is the need for a public relations paradigm shift when it comes to cybersecurity in the Greater Washington region. Area companies must not only promote their federal clients and solutions, but they must also promote the problems they are solving across all other sectors – and across the globe. The speakers agreed the region’s best cyber asset is the unmatched talent and companies must continuously promote and engage this talent to keep them in Greater Washington.

Panelists also discussed the historical 2016 elections and their cybersecurity implications. In every sector cyber threats are permeating all aspects of business and panelists agreed the future judicial implications of cybersecurity will be huge. After all, according to the panelists, cyber risk is business risk.

Why is now the best time to launch a cyber startup in the Greater Washington region? Check out full video coverage of the panel to find out why:

Read Christian Science Monitor’s Passcode coverage of the panel here.

Lights…camera…Cybersecurity Summit! View the Summit’s photo gallery here.

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1021Capital Cybersecurity Summit Logo 3We continue to share content from our inaugural Capital Cybersecurity Summit that took place on Nov. 2-3, 2016 at The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner.

The Summit’s engaging Force Multipliers to Future Cybersecurity Panel explored the Greater Washington Region’s unparalleled cybersecurity talent and the cyber workforce gaps that exist in the region. US Cyber Challenge National Director Karen Evans, MACH37 Managing Partner Rick Gordon, MITRE Innovation Area Lead for Cybersecurity Dr. George Roelke and In-Q-Tel Executive Vice President and Director of Cyber Reboot Teresa Shea participated in the panel. Virginia Tech’s Hume Center for National Security and Technology Director Dr. Charles Clancy moderated.

Dr. Clancy opened the discussion by asking panelists what they thought was the region’s biggest cybersecurity opportunity. All panelists agreed – the region’s cyber talent and expertise are unmatched anywhere. Gordon shared that because of its cyber talent, Greater Washington is at the “center of mass” when it comes to cyber innovation, is able to compete on a global level and offer high cyber investment returns.

Shea stressed that entrepreneurs are flocking to the region to join its cyber movement, driven by their passion to solve cyber problems. Shea also noted that the region has some of the top cyber thought leadership, which is helping to fuel cyber investment and recruitment in the region.

The conversation dove deeper into the region’s cyber hiring gaps and strategies needed to combat those gaps. Some key points from the discussion:

  • By 2020, there will be a 1.5 million shortfall of cybersecurity professionals in the U.S.; this cyber hiring gap requires new recruitment promotion tactics
  • New, customized cyber training and job pathways must be created; not all cyber professionals will have the same educational and professional backgrounds. As the business and communications sides of cyber evolve today, not all cyber positions are created the same
  • The opportunity for personal growth in the cyber field, especially in the Greater Washington region, is tremendous; a personalized approach to promoting different cyber career paths is required to recruit the best talent

Dr. Clancy asked panelists which new college cybersecurity courses they think should be required today. Here are their suggestions:

  • Reverse engineering coding
  • Technology for the liberal arts
  • Mandatory cybersecurity training
  • Experiential learning

In promoting the region’s unique cyber assets, especially its talent, the panelists agreed that a fundamental public relations shift is needed. No longer is cybersecurity in the region strictly entrenched in the federal government. Cyber providers in the region are solving a vast range of problems across the public and private sectors for global clients.

As illustrated by the panelists, cybersecurity culture is in its infancy, especially in the Greater Washington region, and its evolution will be extremely exciting to watch – and shape.

Force Multipliers 1 Force Multipliers 2

Check out the full Capital Cybersecurity Summit photo gallery

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1021Capital Cybersecurity Summit Logo 3Throughout the coming weeks on the NVTC blog we’ll be sharing content from our inaugural Capital Cybersecurity Summit that took place on Nov. 2-3, 2016 at The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner.

One of the Summit’s highlights was the Investment Capital for Cybersecurity Panel, which focused on how to raise sufficient capital to fund promising cyber technologies and applications. The discussion featured Crosslink Capital Venture Partner Matt Bigge, Bessemer Venture Partners Vice President Sunil James, Blackstone CISO Jay Leek and Paladin Founder and Managing Partner Michael Steed. Raymond James Managing Director and Co-Head of Technology & Services Stefan Jansen moderated.

Jansen’s opening question for the investor panelists, “What does it take for cybersecurity startups to matter?” brought to light two themes that emerged throughout the panel: (1) to attract and maintain investors, promising cyber businesses must be inherently committed to innovation; (2) the human capital side of cyber startups and the teams that drive them are as important as the technologies themselves for investors.

Steed shared that he looks to invest in cyber companies that are disruptive in the cyber space and filling a void that solves a distinct cyber problem. James noted that his organization looks for a vitality in startups – energy for innovation that inspires engagement in all ranks of the organization and is infectious.

Bigge noted that his most successful cybersecurity investments have been made in organizations with strong founding teams that are passionate about solving their customers’ problems. Leek agreed, stating that investing in a company’s management team is just as important as the technology itself. Leek encouraged promising cyber businesses to take a deeper look into the efficiency of their operations, a critical factor for investors.

Some of the other noteworthy investment factors panelists shared included:

  • The importance of a quality and diversified revenue base for cyber startups
  • Rising cyber businesses must be able to provide ROI for their products and services after their first year
  • Cyber startups should have the ability to pinpoint opportunities for expansion within their existing customer base

View the full video from the Investment Capital for Cybersecurity Panel below and stay tuned for more Capital Cybersecurity Summit content here on the NVTC blog!

Investment Capital for Cybersecurity Panel Video: 

Check out the Capital Cybersecurity Summit photo gallery!

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1021Capital Cybersecurity Summit Logo 3Leading up to our Capital Cybersecurity Summit NEXT WEEK on November 2-3, 2016, we’re sharing a weekly roundup of some of the top cybersecurity stories. Here are the last week’s top headlines. Tweet us interesting cyber articles at @NOVATechCouncil.

National Cyber Response Plan + Cybersecurity Strategies:
DHS Races to Get Obama’s Signature on Cyber Response Plan   NextGov

Good Cybersecurity Doesn’t Try to Prevent Every Attack   Harvard Business Review

Why the Auto Industry Is Tapping a Boeing Executive to Lead Its Cybersecurity Group   Fortune

DDoS Attack:
Hobbyist hackers probably caused Friday’s Internet meltdown, researchers say   Washington Post

Cybersecurity Meets Privacy Concerns:
Is Facebook’s Facial-Scanning Technology Invading Your Privacy Rights?   Bloomberg Technology

AI + Cybersecurity:
As Artificial Intelligence Evolves, So Does Its Criminal Potential   The New York Times

Want to learn more about NVTC’s 2016 Capital Cybersecurity Summit and register? Click here or watch the video below. #CapitalCyber

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Doug Logan, chief technologist at US Cyber Challenge and CEO of Cyber Ninjas, is the author of our latest cybersecurity guest blog post on new approaches to cybersecurity hiring and retaining top cybersecurity talent. US Cyber Challenge’s National Director, Karen Evans, will be speaking on the Force Multipliers to Future Cybersecurity panel at the 2016 Capital Cybersecurity Summit on Nov. 2-3, 2016.


us cyber challenge logoWith over 209,000 vacant cybersecurity jobs in the U.S and job postings up 74% over the last 5 years; it is an understatement to say that cybersecurity is a growth field. Yet with my work with the US Cyber Challenge, I am routinely told by some of America’s best and brightest that they’re having difficulty finding a job. Once a person reaches the six month mark in a cybersecurity role, recruiters will call like crazy. Getting that initial experience is another story. If we’re going to secure our companies and our country, this is a problem we need to solve.

Traditional hiring practices suggest that we find people who have performed the job function in the past. By this measure, studies have shown that fewer than 25% of cybersecurity applicants are qualified to perform the job functions. I’ve actually had even less optimistic results with less than 10% of candidates qualified. In many cases this is despite certifications, or even similar past job experience. The resource pool is simply not large enough to readily find skilled candidates; and those who are skilled are extremely expensive. I’d like to suggest a different approach: hire the inexperienced and train them.

Time and time again I’ve been surprised at how quickly smart, passionate, but inexperienced individuals out-perform more experienced but “normal” candidates. On average I find that the right candidates learn about twice as fast as your typical candidate. This means that at six months in, my passionate candidate is functioning at the one year experience level; and that one year in, they already function at the equivalent of two years of experience. At this pace it does not take long before they surpass those with more experience; and best of all, home-grown talent is more loyal and won’t typically jump ship. But how do you find this talent?

The best way I’ve found to find smart, passionate, individuals who are interested in cybersecurity is taking a look at those candidates who find the time to learn cybersecurity topics even though they are not required to. This is often showcased in resumes that are littered with self-study topics related to the field, or with participating in one of the many cybersecurity competitions available. This list includes Cyber Aces, Cyber Patriot, the US Cyber Challenge and the National Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition. If you want to check out a site that specializes in showcasing this type of talent, this is why the site CyberCompEx was created.

Unlike the inflated prices of experienced cybersecurity professionals, truly entry-level candidates can typically be picked up at a fraction of the cost. However, with this discount in salary you should be planning on spending a good $5,000-$10,000 the first year on investing in their training. In addition, you should be sure to review their performance at the six month mark and bump their pay appropriately at that time. While home-grown talent is less likely to jump ship, you always need to be in the ball park of their current worth.

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Jack Huffard, president, COO and co-founder of Tenable Network Security, discusses the latest legislation on legacy IT in the federal government in his NVTC guest blog post. Huffard will be participating on the Collaborating for Cyber Success Panel at NVTC’s Capital Cybersecurity Summit on November 2-3, 2016.


jack-huffard-2015-2-webIn government IT, the old adage “if it works, don’t fix it” no longer applies. While legacy systems may still technically be working, they can harbor risky vulnerabilities without vendor support, regular security updates or patch management. This point hit home for many in May when a report from the Government Accountability Office revealed that the country’s nuclear arsenal was still controlled by a system with an 8-inch floppy disk.

More recently, the House Oversight and Reform Committee released its report analyzing the OPM Data Breach that exfiltrated personally identifiable information (PII) of over 4 million government employees and over 21 million more cleared individuals. One of the report’s key recommendations was to modernize existing legacy federal information technology assets to help prevent another such egregious attack.

The Modernizing Government Technology Act of 2016

Earlier this year, to address this urgent situation, two bills were introduced in Congress to help modernize government IT systems – the MOVE IT Act and the IT Modernization Fund. Both bills have since been combined into the Modernizing Government Technology Act of 2016 (the MGT Act). This Act would create individual funds for government agencies and a broader centralized fund to which agencies could apply for financing modernization efforts. The bill states that the funds could be used “for technology related activities, to improve information technology, to enhance cybersecurity across the Federal Government.”

Details of the MGT Act

More specifically, MGT stipulates several areas in which modernization funds can be used, including:

  • Replacing existing systems that are outdated and inefficient
  • Transitioning to cloud computing (using the private sector as a model)
  • Enhancing information security technologies

The Act states that the government currently spends almost 75% of its IT budget (which now totals over $80 billion) on operating and maintaining legacy systems, leaving little left over for modernization efforts. Not only are these systems subject to failure, but as they get older and older, they present greater and greater security risks as well. So it is good to see that the Act encourages not only the simple replacement of agencies’ IT systems, but the addition of cybersecurity technology. Regardless of which new technology is chosen – on-premises, virtual, or cloud-based – there is also a pressing need for better information security solutions for government infrastructures, as evidenced by recent agency breaches.

MGT is unique and different than previous proposals because it does not appropriate funds. Rather, it enables agencies to transfer monies – that they have saved by retiring legacy systems and moving to newer technologies – into individual IT working capital funds. They could then reinvest those funds over the next three years for other modernization initiatives, avoiding the “use it or lose it” cycle.

The Act also calls for a general government-wide IT Modernization Fund. This centralized fund would be overseen by the General Services Administration (GSA) and an IT Modernization Board in accordance with guidance from the Office of Management and Budget. Agencies would apply, and present business cases for access to the funds to modernize their legacy IT infrastructures. The centralized fund would then be replenished with savings from those modernization initiatives.

The 8-member IT Modernization Board would include the Administrator of the Office of Electronic Government, a GSA official, a NIST employee, a DoD employee, a DHS employee, and three tech-savvy federal employees.

Moving forward in the 21st century

The MGT Act was introduced by Rep. Will Hurd (R-Tx.) who is one of the few members of Congress with a computer science degree. It was co-sponsored by Rep. Gerry Connolly (D-Va.) in a welcome display of bipartisan collaboration. The House passed the bill at the end of September 2016. It is now up to the Senate to act on the bill. Prospects for passage are encouraging, and this bill would be a good step towards updating legacy IT systems, strengthening cybersecurity and embracing 21st century technologies.

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