Interested in transitioning to the cloud? Wondering where to start? Then you’ll want to read this NVTC member guest blog from LeaseWeb’s Julia Gortinskaya first to get prepared for your cloud transition.


leaseweb-logoFrom both a business and an IT perspective, migrating to the cloud can be a good option for many businesses. But, it’s not something that can be done without the right research and preparation. If you want to be successful when migrating to the cloud, you need open communication with both your own team and hosting provider, as well as a clearly defined cloud migration strategy that is connected to your business needs. What follow are five tips to help you get started:

1. Share your roadmap

Setting goals is everything. Your goals for migrating to the cloud should be closely connected to your business goals. How fast do you want to grow (i.e. how scalable does your technology need to be)? Who in your organization needs what functionality in order to reach which goal?

Select a cloud partner who is open to discussion about your roadmap and its implementation. Together you can create a technology roadmap that best supports your ambitions. Ideally, your cloud partner is a trusted advisor who shares his or her expertise with you. Keeping in close contact with your partner and sharing the load will also enable you to divide tasks between you: while your cloud provider focuses on hosting a cloud platform and making sure your servers are up-and-running, you will be able to concentrate on creating more value for your customers.

The value of leveraging a third party can only be achieved when both sides understand their responsibilities and expectations. This means communication between you and your partner should be one of your top priorities.

2. Check certifications and compliance statements

Security and compliance are enablers, not obstacles. When migrating to the cloud, it is important to know in advance which certifications your cloud partner has, what exactly is covered and the independent auditor monitoring process. For instance, privacy and compliance certifications are necessary for organizations supporting compliant workloads.

Since security and compliance are shared responsibilities between you and your cloud provider, and perhaps other third parties as well, you’ll likely be able to benefit from the certifications your cloud provider already has in place. If your enterprise data is stored on servers in a datacenter owned by your cloud provider, the physical security of the datacenter is the cloud partner’s responsibility.

Make sure to find answers to questions such as ‘who has access to my data?’, ‘where is my data stored geographically?’ and ‘what are the export restrictions?’ You may prefer to store data in a specific region, but may also be bound to a location by customer contracts and/or privacy laws.

And don’t forget, certifications and regulations evolve over time. Cloud providers should follow developments closely and advise on any action you need to take.  While you may not want to come across as suspicious, you should ask your partner to deliver proof of any certifications.

3. Look for a partner who can scale quickly

When migrating to the cloud, there are different options and delivery models for specific workloads: private, public, hybrid, hyper-scale, on premise and off-premise. New ones are developed at a rapid pace. Explore the options (and the degree of service, the security and the expected costs) that are available for your needs.

Whichever partner you choose, select one that can act the moment you need to scale quickly. If your business requires you to add server capacity either temporarily or for a longer period, your partner should be able to provide the flexibility and speed that you need.

4. Train your people before, during and after

Most cloud projects require a different set of skills from your IT staff to implement and manage workloads (e.g. APIs, open source platforms).Traditional skill sets in server, network and desktop administration are not needed in a cloud environment as they are embedded in the service. In most instances, re-skilling employees in more DevOps centric areas can be wise.

Instead of acquiring engineering skills, your IT staff will have to learn to think more as a cloud architect (which will probably be more challenging than being an administrator anyway). And since tactical day-to-day support is managed by your cloud partner, IT staff should spend more time developing and delivering services and applications that demonstrate direct value to the business.

5. Consider changes in architecture

We have come a long way from ‘one server for one service.’ Cloud computing changes the way applications are deployed and resources are delivered. Your current architecture might work in the cloud, but may also need some changes. Some applications can be migrated to the cloud, while others might require adaptation, such as the decoupling of data. You might also benefit from taking a more service-oriented approach, from cloud services delivered through API’s. Try to design an architecture that will give you full advantage of native cloud features.

You can download the full checklist “10 Do’s and Don’ts When Migrating to the cloud” here.

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This week’s guest blog post is by Qlarion. Qlarion helps the public sector use BI to effectively manage, access and understand information in order to make more effective business decisions. In their blog, Qlarion provides a wrap-up of NVTC’s Big Data and Analytics Committee Meeting that took place in March.


QlarionOn March 7, Qlarion’s CEO, Jake Bittner, moderated a discussion at Northern Virginia Technology Council’s (NVTC) Big Data and Analytics Committee Meeting, where Anthony (Tony) Fung, Virginia Deputy Secretary of Technology; Ernie Steidle, COO/CIO, Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services; and Anthony Wood, Program Manager, Virginia Information Technologies Agency’s Innovation Center of Excellence, shared thoughts on the challenges and opportunities related to big data and analytics in Virginia.

Deputy Secretary of Technology Tony Fung kicked off the event with a discussion of the landscape of data analytics across the Commonwealth. Deputy Secretary Fung emphasized that there have been individual analytics success stories among several state agencies and the opportunity for real progress through analytics has never been better.

Virginia now has the resources in place to implement big data and analytics programs on a large scale.

In 2016, Governor McAuliffe issued Executive Directive 7, which mandates data sharing across state agencies. Deputy Secretary Fung announced that a final report, which will provide agencies with more detail about how to comply with the directive, will be released in a few weeks.

Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services’ Ernie Steidle reported that, in addition to the executive directive, the state legislature recently passed HB 2457, which enables data sharing across Health and Human Resources agencies. The law dictates that all HHR agencies and departments, for the purpose of data sharing, be considered a single organization. Eliminating barriers between the agencies will increase efficiency and streamline services for constituents. Based on the results of the initiative, other agency groups, such as Public Safety, could adapt the same model.

The state has solidified its commitment to modernizing its technology programs by forming the Virginia Information Technologies Agency’s Innovation Center of Excellence (VITA ICE). Virginia Information Technologies Agency’s Innovation Center of Excellence’s Anthony Wood explained that VITA ICE’s primary goal is to evaluate and implement new technologies by leveraging the capabilities of Virginia’s technology companies. It’s developed a number of resources to establish relationships with Virginia tech companies.

State leadership is also intent on securing internal buy-in and educating government decision makers on the value of big data and analytics. The upcoming Governor’s Data Analytics Summit, an event exclusively for state and local government employees, will feature a lineup of speakers and panelists who will discuss how agencies can overcome challenges and achieve their goals through analytics. The event will offer actionable strategies for scoping and launching analytics projects.

This blog post originally appeared on Qlarion’s website.

Click here to learn more about the Big Data and Analytics Committee.

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Does your brand have a “special sauce” for marketing and attracting new job candidates? This week’s member guest blog is by Insperity Social Media Manager, Recruiting Services, Kara Singh. Singh shares strategies for getting your company noticed in a crowded job market and recruiting top talent. 


insperity-ogIn a recent survey, more than two-thirds of hiring organizations indicated that they’re having a difficult time recruiting for job openings, according to the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM).

With a lower unemployment rate and more job openings, it’s becoming increasingly critical for employers to make sure they get noticed in the crowded job market.

Here’s how to mix up your employer brand, so it begins to stand out.

1. Create a consistent message

Your reputation is everything. You’ve heard it before. But what does that mean in the context of being an employer in a competitive job market?

It means prioritizing the special sauce that is your employer brand. Your employer brand should tell candidates why they should want to work for you.

What makes your company culture so appetizing? Why do your employees want to come to work every day? What do they look forward to? What benefits do they enjoy?

For example, you might find that employees like how your company facilitates a collaborative work environment or that they love your community involvement team activities.

As you answer these questions, you’re beginning to build your employer brand and making your company a more attractive place to work.

2. Define your company culture

Your company culture should attract the employees you want, while repelling those who don’t fit your culture.

While the bones of it should be a reflection of your company’s core mission, vision and values, it’s the real experiences of your employees that are the meat and potatoes of your culture.

That’s why you need to have a management team that walks the walk. For example, do your leaders model your values? Do your values challenge them to do their best every day?

Use employee surveys to take the temperature of your company culture and make sure it’s meeting your standards. Employee feedback can help to ensure your culture isn’t half baked.

When you feel confident that you know and understand what sets your company apart, entice job candidates by sharing the secret ingredients of your culture as you interview.

For instance, if your company places emphasis on corporate responsibility, you might ask a question that lends itself to the topic so you can integrate it naturally into the conversation. You could ask “How do you make a difference in your community?” You can follow up their response with details on how your company gives back.

By offering up these vibrant details, you can create a competitive edge in the job market as you look to fill vacant positions.

3. Define your benefits

Prospective employees want more than just a good work environment. They’re also seeking benefits that are comparable or better than what they’re receiving in their current role. This includes things like health, life and disability insurance, retirement savings plans, and paid time-off.

If you’re a smaller company, you may think you can’t compete with big company benefits. However, there are many perks you might be able to offer that bigger companies don’t.

For example, do you allow flexible work schedules or telecommuting? Do you offer on-site snacks in your break room? Do you have a job shadowing program that can help employees expand their skills?

Special perks can help set your company apart. Be sure to clearly define these extra benefits and share them with potential employees.

4. Develop employee ambassadors

With a great employer brand, company culture and employee benefits, you’d think it’d be a piece of cake finding new talent.

But the truth is that finding good people will still take work. Luckily, you can look to your current workforce for assistance.

You won’t find better ambassadors for your company than your own employees, but you’ll need to guide them to ensure they’re accurately communicating the best attributes of your brand.

To become ambassadors, your employees must be engaged in your business with a commitment to your mission, vision and values. They should easily be able to describe your culture. They should know how to pepper in the perks of their jobs.

With some basic training in these areas, you can easily empower your employees to become brand ambassadors and recruit talent from their own contacts. For example, you might have a training session for employees where you go over company talking points and how to create and manage a LinkedIn presence. Social media offers a great avenue for employees to instantly reach candidates you wouldn’t have access to otherwise.

5. Monitor your reputation on the internet

You wouldn’t expect someone to eat at a restaurant with bad reviews. Why would you expect someone to work for an employer with negative ratings?

Potential job candidates today have access to a vast amount of online information about your company before they even step foot in the door for interviews. You want to make sure this information reflects as positively as possible on your company.

With sites like Glassdoor, an online forum where former employees can describe their experiences with your company, you want to make sure you’re defending your employer brand by telling your side of the story, too. While you can’t undo criticism, you can show your transparency and willingness to listen.

For instance, did a disgruntled employee leave an unsavory comment about his or her experience? Take the time to respond publicly and show potential candidates reading it that you care.

Also, consider setting up Google Alerts to keep tabs on how your brand is represented online. Every time your company name is mentioned online, Google will send you an email alert.

Additionally, keep an eye on social media sites. There are a variety of social monitoring tools available that allow you to follow mentions of your brand.

Keep your eye on the prize

With new strategies in tow, you’re better prepared to take on the competitive landscape.

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When Women Have a Chance in Tech…

March 7th, 2017 | Posted by Alexa Magdalenski in Guest Blogs | Member Blog Posts - (Comments Off)

Our newest member guest blog post is by Elizabeth Lindsey, executive director of Byte Back. Byte Back improves economic opportunity by providing computer training and career preparation to underserved Washington, D.C. metro area residents. 


Byte BackJust 25 percent of the computing workforce in the U.S. is women. For women of color, this drops drastically, with just three percent of the workforce made up of African American women and one percent Latina women.

Only 17 percent of Fortune 500 Chief Information Officer (CIO) positions were held by women in 2015.1

March 8 is International Women’s Day – a day to celebrate progress, recognize deficits and act for equality. Today is the perfect day to give a woman her start in tech.

When women are offered the chance to learn and use technology the same as men, women access vital life opportunities, including high-paying jobs, healthcare, sexual and gender violence services, family care, and more.

With technology, women can connect to the world and build connections to employers, friends and family. With technology, women can move into jobs to support their families – tech jobs, white collar jobs and medial jobs. With technology, women can help their families – teach their children, communicate with teachers and open up a world of knowledge.

It doesn’t have to be expensive, or complicated. So much can be solved by teaching women how to use technology. With a small investment in women’s lives, we can have a huge impact on social change.

Today, we urge you to find a way to support women, whether it’s as a mentor, a volunteer, a supporter of a community organization or as a recruiter. There are countless organizations opening opportunities for women to cross the digital divide and to advance in IT careers, and we encourage you to be a part of this movement.

By 2024, the number of U.S. computing-related job openings expected to be 1.1 million.1 If we all work together, we can make sure women not only fill more technology positions, but have the power to use technology to change lives.


In Byte Back’s 20 years, their demographics have never reflected the outside tech world. Increasing opportunities for underserved residents goes hand-in-hand with increasing diversity in tech companies. In 2016, 417 women, or 61 percent of the student body, found empowering tech skills for free at Byte Back.

1 National Center for Women & Information Technology. (2016). By the Numbers.

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Interested in fine tuning your corporate messaging? Then you’ll want to read our latest member guest blog from Carlos Cruz, Client Relations at TriVision, Inc. TriVision is an award-winning, full service agency that develops innovative strategies to achieve powerful and creative integrated marketing solutions.


Final Logo 2014-2016 TriVision Logo v2It is in a corporation’s best interest to strategically push their value-driven corporate messaging whenever and wherever they can. Here are the reasons why:

Corporate messaging reinforces your target audience’s identity.

People like to associate themselves with others who have the same mindset as they do. It’s like being friends with someone because they like the same hobbies you do.

Corporate messaging builds a community around the same set of values you cherish. In the case of AirBnb, their strategy was to send a message that acceptance of everyone (regardless of race, religion, sexual orientation, or other external factors) is a common human value that most can agree upon (however, at times we may need to be reminded of this).

Create corporate messages that make your target audience proud to associate themselves with you.

Corporate Messaging reinforces brand identity.

When a corporate message is done well and communicated often, those tactics boost brand identity. When a corporate message is value-driven, it often creates a positive association with your company.

Corporate Messaging told as a story, stick better.

Why is it that you are more likely to remember childhood stories like “The Boy Who Cried Wolf” or “The Three Little Pigs” than a 30-page report on whatever it is you specialize in? For 27,000 years, humans have been telling stories to communicate information with one another. Stories connect people. Often, you will find a company’s background explaining why they choose to carry certain values. Blending your corporate messaging with a story will make your company memorable.

Remember, values are what brings all of us together. Make sure that your corporate messaging has a value-driven approach.

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Our newest guest blog is written by C. Michael Ferraro, president and CEO of Training Solutions, Inc. (TSI). TSI provides diverse performance development training programs, human resources services, executive coaching, workforce consulting and facilitation of retreats for a variety of companies across the nation and worldwide. In his blog, Ferraro shares five behaviors for building thriving intact teams.


tsi logoIn most companies, there are ongoing challenges for increased productivity and good employee relationships; and the concept of successful teamwork is always a part of the puzzle. Many companies are uncomfortable looking at team problems. Those companies are aware of the challenges they face with teams trying to work better together, but they don’t know how to “fix” the problems because they don’t know what is causing the problems.

Intact teams really need to thrive. Whether individuals believe it or not, the goals of the team should take priority over individual goals in order to truly succeed. A team should look “inside” itself, being honest about their challenges. There are five key behaviors that every intact team should understand, according to Patrick Lencioni. Lencioni has worked with thousands of senior executives in organizations ranging from Fortune 500 and mid-size companies to start-ups and nonprofits. Lencioni is the author of many best-selling business books including The Five Dysfunctions of a Team that has sold over two million copies and continues to be a fixture on national best-seller lists week after week.

His newest program is called The Five Behaviors of a Cohesive Team (based on his best-selling book, The Five Dysfunctions of a Team). Based on Lencioni’s model, the five key behavioral areas are Trust, Conflict, Commitment, Accountability and Results. Every individual on the team completes an online assessment and then the team report is developed. The assessment-based approach is extremely powerful. I am an authorized partner of this program and work with many teams to improve their working relationships and results.

These five behaviors are very important to the success of team and need to be honestly discussed in depth with the team. I walk through the assessment results with all the team members together and help them work through their challenges as they learn to develop into a stronger and more successful team.

Building Trust. This is a fundamental and foundational behavior of a cohesive team. Lencioni believes that trust means (1) “a willingness to be completely vulnerable with one another” and (2) “confidence among team members that their peers’ intentions are good and that there is no reason to be protective or careful around the team.” Can you say that you know many trusting teams? Teams always need to begin with a discussion regarding trust to be open and honest about their issues. Without high trust, the rest cannot be improved.

Mastering Conflict. Productive conflict is needed to have relationships grow that can last over time. Conflict is needed and shouldn’t be considered “off limits” in the workplace. Healthy and productive conflict is not focused on the individuals but connected to subjects and ideas. Productive conflict should not be avoided. Great teams need thoughtful debates to provide great solutions. When I facilitate this program, we also talk about those unhealthy behaviors around conflict and give the team a team map they can use to help them use conflict constructively.

Achieving Commitment. When talking about commitment, Lencioni is focused on the team’s decisions and making sure there is complete buy-in among every member of the team. Of course, some members may disagree at different points in the discussion; but in the end, there should be complete agreement to move forward with the decision. Great teams understand the importance of the commitment. Without total commitment, there will be ambiguity or missed opportunities or low confidence and more.

Embracing Accountability. This means, per Lencioni, the “willingness of team members to call their peers on performance or behaviors that might hurt the team.” This is very important because team members must feel comfortable sharing their discomfort with another team member about their performance or behavior. This feedback is given from the perspective of wanting to help the team succeed and should be appreciated.

Focusing on Results. Of course, going through the discussions and learning about the four previous behaviors is to produce increased positive results. You’d be surprised how often a team isn’t focused on team results. Perhaps team members are focused on their own individual status, position or results. The collective success of the team is most important.

This assessment-based program will give a team a great opportunity to learn more about each member of the team and how to work better together to be truly a great team. The results we have had with teams has been dramatic, showing better team harmony and increased productivity. We also offer to come back to the team after a period of months and reassess the team in these areas.

To learn more about improving intact teams click here.

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Our latest Capital Data Summit guest blog is from Srdjan Marinovic, CTO of DC-based startup Wireless Registry. Wireless Registry indexes the world’s detectable WiFi, Bluetooth and Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) signals in a single, searchable platform. Marinovic will be a panelist on the Identity Management in the Age of the Internet of Things panel at the Capital Data Summit taking place on February 15, 2017 at The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner.


WRThe proliferation of Internet of Things (IoT) devices poses new security challenges. Sensitive IoT use cases, like financial transactions and access control, must be secured against novel attacker models on an unprecedented scale. Significantly, traditional identity verification and authentication methods ‒ reliant on connection and the exchange of secrets (passwords or keys) ‒ are impractical across so many billions of wireless devices. As a result, Wireless Registry envisions identity for the IoT as a “secret-less” cloud solution constructed from IoT contexts.

An IoT context is a set of wireless devices in proximity to each other. The WiFi, Bluetooth and BLE signals these things emit create temporal clusters. For example, a home context may comprise a WiFi router, Bluetooth speaker, TV and a smartphone; a transportation context a number of cars on a highway and the surrounding urban infrastructure; a payment context several routers, a point of sale and customers’ BLE wearables. Devices can leverage IoT contexts as identities that inform trust-based decision-making prior to taking an action. A driverless car, for example, may augment its assessment that it is, in fact, parked in front of an airport terminal prior to unlocking for a passenger, based on the (anonymized) “fingerprint” of detectable signals around it.

Devices move around, so proximity is constantly changing. At any given moment, wireless things enter and exit IoT contexts. Signal contexts are dynamic, both for fixed spaces and for the individual mobile devices that pass through them. A smartphone will develop a temporal identity ‒ its own IoT context ‒ based on patterns of detections of things it encounters as it moves through the world (its owner’s wearables, item tracker, car, home and work WiFi contexts, and much more). Consequently, prior to enabling a mobile payment transaction, an app may rely on several different trusted IoT contexts to support not only that it is close to a payment terminal and inside a retail store, but also alert to abnormal usage patterns that could indicate possible theft or loss of that smartphone.

In summary, whereas legacy paradigms continue to inspire security approaches that involve keys and secrets, Wireless Registry suggests that identities for the IoT may be constructed and verified through IoT contexts. Indeed, although traditional solutions are adequate on smaller scale enterprises, on a global scale they are not feasible, and thus contextual identities are the solution.


With a Ph.D. in computer security from Imperial College London and a research background in information security at ETH Zurich, Srdjan Marinovic is CTO of Washington, DC-based startup Wireless Registry.

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In his guest blog, Earth Networks Chief Marketing Officer Anuj Agrawal shares an inside look into the power of environmental data and how it is making cities smarter, cleaner and more resilient. Agrawal will be speaking on the Smart Cities Panel at the 2017 Capital Data Summit taking place on February 15, 2017 at The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner.


EN new color logoYou interact with environmental data on a daily basis. It’s there when you turn your smartphone on to silence your alarm. It’s on your TV when you sip your morning coffee. And it’s on the radio during your commute to work. Free weather data and other types of environmental information helps us pick out our outfits, time our commute and plan our after-work activities. But can it do more than that?

We here at Earth Networks think so. And so does the Smart City Council Readiness Program. All ten of the Smart Cities Council Readiness Challenge Grant finalists named energy or some form of the environment as their top priority. This is because weather and greenhouse gas (GHG) data play vital roles in making cities more livable, workable, sustainable and resilient.

Commercial-grade weather data provides more than just a weekly forecast. In fact, its diverse capabilities make it a key component for resilient cities. Weather data affects a city’s population and some aspects of the economy; offering insights that no other data set can provide. Advanced weather data feeds and historical data is easily integrated into predictive models that can provide cities with smart decision-support so that you can plan for both routine and severe weather events.

As people begin to move out of the suburbs and into the cities, city pollution is on the rise. The scientific community estimates that 70% of GHGs are generated in urban areas. GHG data is so important because if you can quantify the amount of emissions in your city, you can make steps towards controlling it. With GHG data, smart cities can develop smart policies to reign in those emissions and have local, accurate baseline data to support their initiatives.

Environmental data is critical for smart city development. Both weather data and GHG data offer insights that can make communities safer, healthier and, ultimately, smarter. To learn more about how weather and GHG data can both help mitigate financial, operational and human risk in smart cities developing across the world, don’t miss the Smart Cities Panel at the Capital Data Summit on February 15, 2017.

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Big Data: An Essential Public Asset

February 6th, 2017 | Posted by Alexa Magdalenski in Capital Data Summit | Guest Blogs - (Comments Off)

In his Capital Data Summit guest blog post, District of Columbia Chief Data Officer Barney Krucoff discusses the District’s new data investment and data accessibility plans and the importance of leveraging big data in municipalities today. Krucoff will be a speaker on the Role of the CDO panel at the 2017 Capital Data Summit on February 15, 2017 at The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner.


OCTO DCThe District of Columbia government has consistently blazed the trail to public data access. Whether real-time traffic patterns or invaluable health statistics, the data collected and managed by the District is an essential public asset. Just as important as our schools, roads and buildings, we would not have a functioning city without data.

Now under the leadership of Chief Technology Officer Archana Vemulapalli, the Office of the Chief Technology Officer (OCTO) more than ever before understands the need to leverage the District’s data investment and the significance of data accessibility. OCTO launched drafts.dc.gov, DC’s version of the Madison Project, to gather public comments and feedback from the public, tech and open government activists, civic groups, and government agencies.

Now, our comprehensive Open Data Policy represents a consensus of viewpoints, balancing safety, privacy and security concerns while mandating openness and transparency. The opportunity to share more data realizes Mayor Muriel Bowser’s commitment to use technology to innovate, increase transparency, and improve accountability across the government.

The final version of the Open Data Policy will modernize and augment the District’s central data catalog. In turn, the public, media, entrepreneurs and academics will gain greater access to a variety of data sets. And, to build on their feedback, stakeholder and resident input will be the barometer by which we measure policy success. These insights will allow OCTO to learn from successes and shortcomings while planning for a secure, yet transparent, future. Our collective knowledge and expertise makes us more effective and better positioned to become one of the most open jurisdictions in the country.

Learn more about D.C. OCTO here.

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Embracing Big Data

February 2nd, 2017 | Posted by Alexa Magdalenski in Capital Data Summit | Guest Blogs | Member Blog Posts - (Comments Off)

The inaugural 2017 Capital Data Summit is less than two weeks away! Susan Burke, vice president, single family data delivery services at Freddie Mac, will be participating on the Role of the CDO panel at the Summit. In her guest blog post, Burke shares thoughts and questions leaders should consider when aligning big data activities with their organization’s business goals. 


Freddie-Mac-Web-LogoLike many enterprises, we at Freddie Mac are in the process of determining what big data means to us. This past year, we started our journey to expand from the traditional rationalized data stores to the world of unstructured data and new technologies. One step on that path was considering a Hadoop environment. Would it bring value? What business problems would it solve?

The first lesson we learned is one that we tend to see repeated in the IT-business world. In our case, we raced to develop a new technology. Why wouldn’t we, when there were “obvious” value propositions we knew we could deliver? It quickly became apparent that, while our initial proof-of-concept provided insight into what needed to change from a back-end engineering perspective, we had not aligned with the business. Without a strong business champion, technology for the sake of technology efforts is doomed.

Fortunately, a strong, respected business leader stepped up to garner support and help IT define the business-use cases that would deliver value to the organization. Off we went.

Now that we’ve implemented Hadoop, what does it mean? How do we support it? Where do the data scientists fit into this picture? The technology in the data landscape is changing fast — and it is evolving in ways that were unimaginable just a few years ago. That means IT organizations are changing. The skill sets needed are different. The delivery methods are different. The way we integrate into our existing environments is different. We need to ask, “What hypothesis do I want to explore?” instead of “What are the requirements?” And all change is hard.

We decided the most useful model for Freddie Mac is one that combines business and IT resources in one team, so we created our Big Data Center of Excellence (CoE). This CoE brings together dedicated resources to support the development of use cases, deliver data not currently available on the platform and measure value. The data scientists remain in the business areas and can concentrate on asking new questions and executing analytics and visualizations.

The rapidly-evolving world of big data is exciting, and both IT and the business are in it together. We will continue to partner closely with our business leaders to identify the most impactful structure to help us evolve to a data lake structure.

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