NVTC’s Spring 2017 The Voice of Technology magazine cover story, “Past is Prologue,” highlighted the Internet2 networking consortium and its role in supporting the early stages of the Internet, as well as its continued impact in connecting universities, government agencies, libraries, healthcare organizations and corporations today.

As a follow up to the article, University of Maryland Associate Vice President for Corporate and Foundation Relations Brian Darmody discusses University of Maryland’s role in early Internet development below in their new member blog post.


Did you know the nation’s first Internet exchange point was established at the University of Maryland (UMD)?

UMD Blog v2UMD and UMD Professor Glenn Ricart played a strong role in the start of the interconnected Internet that we know of today. Prof. Ricart developed the nation’s first Internet exchange point at UMD in 1988, which connected the original federal TCP/IP networks and the first U.S. commercial and non-commercial networks. Arguably, this was the world’s first ISP as a commercial vendor joined the previously university-only network. This exchange point was called the Federal Internet Exchange (FIX), then FIX-East and then MAE-East.

Later, Prof. Ricart would go on to help UMD establish the nation’s first TCP/IP university campus-wide network.  For these and other accomplishments, Prof. Ricart was inducted into the Internet Hall of Fame in 2013.

Prof. Ricart’s early work in laying the foundation for the Internet continues today in the Mid-Atlantic Crossroads in the UMD Research Park, which is one of the nation’s most robust regional high-speed connectivity networks for research and service to K-12 schools, universities, nonprofits, federal research agencies and the private sector, including counties in Virginia, companies in D.C. and federal agencies in Maryland.

In 1994, UMD’s alumni magazine featured an article on the early work UMD did in computer networking in the 1980s, which featured one of the first computer messages that was delivered from UMD to George Washington University. It is interesting to read the article now given the ubiquity of computer networking today, but is a proud illustration of our region’s role in pioneering the early computer communications infrastructure. Check out the article below:

 

Internet Network Is Born (Fall 1994, UMD Alumni Magazine)

UMD Blog 1At the annual Computer Science Center Christmas party in 1986, the champagne glasses were clinking, the holiday music was humming and Jack Hahn, project director for the newly formed Southeastern University Research Association network (SURAnet), was “walking on air.” On that day, an electronic message was sent from the University of Maryland at College Park to George Washington University — the first on a network whose technology would become the model for what Hahn calls, “one of the most powerful intellectual tools that mankind has ever had at its fingertips.”

Although no one seems to recall just what that historic message was (“probably, something like ‘hey, is this thing working?’” says Hahn), the first few keystrokes were the culmination of years of work initiated by Glenn Ricart, director of the university’s Computer Science Center.

The idea was to link the 14 SURA institutions into a communications network so that information could be trans-ferred between academic departments on each campus. It was such a novel idea at the time that, when Ricart brought his proposal to the National Science Foundation, they couldn’t tell him which office to send it to. “Nobody had ever done a network like this before, and it wasn’t clear that this was science and how this would help science, so NSF really didn’t know what to do with it,” he says (the NSF ended up establishing an entire division for networking and computing and solicited similar proposals).

In the meantime, Ricart, Hahn, Mark Oros, network operations supervisor, and Mike Petry, manager of communication  software, retreated to the nondescript basement of the Computer and Space Sciences building and began wiring the circuits that would link an entire region.

By late spring of 1987, connections to the original SURAnet universities were up and running. Colleges and universities from other regions recognized a good thing and began flocking to College Park to see the new technology. The National Science Foundation then decided to link all the regional networks using something called “fuzzball technology” developed by Dave Mills, an adjunct professor at College Park, and the humble beginnings of what would become known as the present-day Internet were formed.

Hahn originally monitored the fledgling network from his basement. “I used to say SURAnet has a network information center and a network operations center — a nic and noc — and you’re talking to both of them,” he says.

Adding more universities, federal institutions and commercial networks, SURAnet grew too large to remain on campus and now employs 40 people in a “somewhat secret” location on Route 1 in College Park. Over 400 organizations across 13 states and the District of Columbia are supported by the network, ranging from the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Maryland to the U.S. Department of Natural Resources and state and local governments in the region.

 

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This week’s NVTC member guest blog is by Telos Corporation CEO and Chairman and NVTC Board Member John B. Wood. Telos Corporation is an information technology leader that offers solutions to empower and protect the world’s most security-conscious enterprises.


telos-logoWith the May 11 signing of the “Presidential Executive Order on Strengthening the Cybersecurity of Federal Networks and Critical Infrastructure,” our nation took a major step forward in improving our overall cyber posture.

As I said in the hours after the President signed the order, even the most rigorous processes for managing modern cyber threats require a foundation of modern technology. That’s why I was encouraged to see that the executive order specifically instructed federal agencies to show preference in their procurement for shared IT services, including the cloud. A growing number of federal agencies have realized that the cloud offers them secure and cost-efficient computing capabilities, but many others have been hesitant to make the move. This executive order provides the needed boost for all agencies to look towards the cloud.

With this executive order and the latest version of the Modernizing Government Technology Act (MGT) legislation moving through Congress, I believe we have reached a tipping point where the federal government will have the White House support and the financial means to truly tackle IT modernization and make it a top area of focus for every agency. In unveiling the order, the White House also showed vision by saying that planned federal IT modernization will include transitioning agencies to one or more consolidated networks, with the goal being to view “our IT as one federal enterprise network.”

Another very interesting aspect of the order, which I was likewise encouraged to see, was the direction for all federal agencies to immediately begin to use the NIST Cybersecurity Framework (CSF) to manage their cybersecurity risk.  At Telos, we have long advocated for a common language when it comes to cybersecurity so stakeholders in all areas of the organization can communicate about cyber risk, which ultimately leads to more informed decisions about what security investments need to be made. The CSF is a powerful framework for enabling improved risk management throughout the government enterprise. Replacing outdated legacy systems, and making adoption of the framework more efficient with automation, will only strengthen our government’s cybersecurity defenses.

In the near-term, I will be paying close attention as agencies work to provide their own 90-day plans for implementing the NIST CSF, as required by this executive order.

Locally, this order should be welcome news to the vast number of technology and cybersecurity companies in Northern Virginia who work with the federal government. For those of us in this field, the executive order is exactly the type of nudge that federal agencies have needed to make the necessary improvements to their IT infrastructure and cybersecurity posture. However, for this executive order to truly deliver value, it will be contingent upon industry and government working together. I have no doubt that industry will step up to ensure success.

Overall, the cybersecurity executive order constitutes a long-overdue move by the federal government to take the steps necessary to better protect its networks and data. Moreover, the order sends a powerful message that our nation’s cyber defenses must continuously be monitored, evaluated and improved, and that this effort will be a key priority for this administration over the coming months and years.

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Does your organization have a mentoring program? Have a well-structured employee mentoring program in place is a vital component to the mentoring experience. Read on for important tips from Insperity for shaping your organization’s mentoring program.


insperity v2Mentorship can play a critical role in the successful onboarding of new employees and the long-term development of existing team members. But how do you determine the right mentor for a particular mentee?

Should they be like-minded or in similar roles? Or, should the mentor be strong in the skills that the employee needs the most growth in? What role does personality fit play?

First, a definition: A mentor is not another boss, but a helpful confidant who gives relevant, occasional feedback and guidance that helps the employee gain needed skills.

Mentoring is different from performance management. A mentor program targets those employees who are already performing well and need extra input to grow and reach their full potential.

Mentoring is not remedial learning. If an employee is underperforming or has some other workplace problem, their manager must tackle the issue through coaching and other performance management techniques, not by selecting a mentor.

Know what you want to accomplish

The type of mentor you choose for an employee depends on your business goals. Does the employee in question need help with technical skills or leadership skills? Is this a new employee or a long-term employee?

You first need to know what you want to accomplish to successfully pair a mentor and mentee.

For instance, a new employee will probably benefit from a mentor who helps them learn about your business’s cultural norms and processes. This mentor should have an open mind and an open ear to candidly speak about processes and the best ways to navigate the environment.

They should also be experienced and organized enough to explain key procedures, and communicate clearly and consistently.

On the other hand, if you’ve identified a junior machinist who needs to learn a particular technical skill, you’ll want to pick a mentor who has that skill and who also communicates well.

If a junior executive wants to become a senior executive, the mentor should be able to offer guidance on cultural norms and processes, look for ways the mentee’s potential can benefit the organization and facilitate getting the mentee connected to these new opportunities.

A mentor should have the necessary communication skills and desire to be a continual learner, not someone with a tired or know-it-all attitude. Mentors should also be willing to share ownership and accountability for the work, giving the mentee credit when it’s due. Remember, mentoring is a two-way street, so pick a mentor who is willing to listen, give good counsel and learn from their mentee.

Another aspect of that two-way street: Not all mentors have to be older, long-time employees. Maybe one of your younger employees can help an older one gain confidence in using new software or social media for work or offer up-to-date information on the latest business technologies and workplace trends.

Yes, pairing employees with similar viewpoints, life experiences and work styles may help the relationship succeed, but ultimately the match should be determined by your organization’s needs.

Success requires structure

Larger companies often build significant structure around their mentor programs, with formal pairings, training and reporting required. That sort of structure may not be practical for a smaller business, but to be successful your mentor program will still need some definition.

What that structure looks like will be determined by the business goals you identified earlier. But, you still need to define goals, expectations and schedules. You also need to make sure both the mentor and mentee have time to accomplish the goals you set.

For example, if the mentee needs to gain technical expertise, the mentorship may consist of the mentor teaching specific skills and the mentee practicing at consistent times followed by question-and-answer periods. A mentor-mentee pairing like this may only last a few weeks or months, with a clearly defined goal that technical expertise will be attained by a certain date.

Follow-up is important too. Ask questions such as:

  • Did the mentorship help you learn that new skill or refine an existing skill?
  • Did the program help you get more comfortable in your new job?
  • Was it a good use of your time?
  • Do you feel better prepared to handle the work ahead?

Answers to these questions will help you determine whether your mentor-mentee pairs are a good fit. If they’re not, don’t hesitate to break up a pair and reassign them to other people. Mentor pairs are as individual as the people involved, and not everyone will be compatible.

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Interested in transitioning to the cloud? Wondering where to start? Then you’ll want to read this NVTC member guest blog from LeaseWeb’s Julia Gortinskaya first to get prepared for your cloud transition.


leaseweb-logoFrom both a business and an IT perspective, migrating to the cloud can be a good option for many businesses. But, it’s not something that can be done without the right research and preparation. If you want to be successful when migrating to the cloud, you need open communication with both your own team and hosting provider, as well as a clearly defined cloud migration strategy that is connected to your business needs. What follow are five tips to help you get started:

1. Share your roadmap

Setting goals is everything. Your goals for migrating to the cloud should be closely connected to your business goals. How fast do you want to grow (i.e. how scalable does your technology need to be)? Who in your organization needs what functionality in order to reach which goal?

Select a cloud partner who is open to discussion about your roadmap and its implementation. Together you can create a technology roadmap that best supports your ambitions. Ideally, your cloud partner is a trusted advisor who shares his or her expertise with you. Keeping in close contact with your partner and sharing the load will also enable you to divide tasks between you: while your cloud provider focuses on hosting a cloud platform and making sure your servers are up-and-running, you will be able to concentrate on creating more value for your customers.

The value of leveraging a third party can only be achieved when both sides understand their responsibilities and expectations. This means communication between you and your partner should be one of your top priorities.

2. Check certifications and compliance statements

Security and compliance are enablers, not obstacles. When migrating to the cloud, it is important to know in advance which certifications your cloud partner has, what exactly is covered and the independent auditor monitoring process. For instance, privacy and compliance certifications are necessary for organizations supporting compliant workloads.

Since security and compliance are shared responsibilities between you and your cloud provider, and perhaps other third parties as well, you’ll likely be able to benefit from the certifications your cloud provider already has in place. If your enterprise data is stored on servers in a datacenter owned by your cloud provider, the physical security of the datacenter is the cloud partner’s responsibility.

Make sure to find answers to questions such as ‘who has access to my data?’, ‘where is my data stored geographically?’ and ‘what are the export restrictions?’ You may prefer to store data in a specific region, but may also be bound to a location by customer contracts and/or privacy laws.

And don’t forget, certifications and regulations evolve over time. Cloud providers should follow developments closely and advise on any action you need to take.  While you may not want to come across as suspicious, you should ask your partner to deliver proof of any certifications.

3. Look for a partner who can scale quickly

When migrating to the cloud, there are different options and delivery models for specific workloads: private, public, hybrid, hyper-scale, on premise and off-premise. New ones are developed at a rapid pace. Explore the options (and the degree of service, the security and the expected costs) that are available for your needs.

Whichever partner you choose, select one that can act the moment you need to scale quickly. If your business requires you to add server capacity either temporarily or for a longer period, your partner should be able to provide the flexibility and speed that you need.

4. Train your people before, during and after

Most cloud projects require a different set of skills from your IT staff to implement and manage workloads (e.g. APIs, open source platforms).Traditional skill sets in server, network and desktop administration are not needed in a cloud environment as they are embedded in the service. In most instances, re-skilling employees in more DevOps centric areas can be wise.

Instead of acquiring engineering skills, your IT staff will have to learn to think more as a cloud architect (which will probably be more challenging than being an administrator anyway). And since tactical day-to-day support is managed by your cloud partner, IT staff should spend more time developing and delivering services and applications that demonstrate direct value to the business.

5. Consider changes in architecture

We have come a long way from ‘one server for one service.’ Cloud computing changes the way applications are deployed and resources are delivered. Your current architecture might work in the cloud, but may also need some changes. Some applications can be migrated to the cloud, while others might require adaptation, such as the decoupling of data. You might also benefit from taking a more service-oriented approach, from cloud services delivered through API’s. Try to design an architecture that will give you full advantage of native cloud features.

You can download the full checklist “10 Do’s and Don’ts When Migrating to the cloud” here.

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This week’s guest blog post is by Qlarion. Qlarion helps the public sector use BI to effectively manage, access and understand information in order to make more effective business decisions. In their blog, Qlarion provides a wrap-up of NVTC’s Big Data and Analytics Committee Meeting that took place in March.


QlarionOn March 7, Qlarion’s CEO, Jake Bittner, moderated a discussion at Northern Virginia Technology Council’s (NVTC) Big Data and Analytics Committee Meeting, where Anthony (Tony) Fung, Virginia Deputy Secretary of Technology; Ernie Steidle, COO/CIO, Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services; and Anthony Wood, Program Manager, Virginia Information Technologies Agency’s Innovation Center of Excellence, shared thoughts on the challenges and opportunities related to big data and analytics in Virginia.

Deputy Secretary of Technology Tony Fung kicked off the event with a discussion of the landscape of data analytics across the Commonwealth. Deputy Secretary Fung emphasized that there have been individual analytics success stories among several state agencies and the opportunity for real progress through analytics has never been better.

Virginia now has the resources in place to implement big data and analytics programs on a large scale.

In 2016, Governor McAuliffe issued Executive Directive 7, which mandates data sharing across state agencies. Deputy Secretary Fung announced that a final report, which will provide agencies with more detail about how to comply with the directive, will be released in a few weeks.

Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services’ Ernie Steidle reported that, in addition to the executive directive, the state legislature recently passed HB 2457, which enables data sharing across Health and Human Resources agencies. The law dictates that all HHR agencies and departments, for the purpose of data sharing, be considered a single organization. Eliminating barriers between the agencies will increase efficiency and streamline services for constituents. Based on the results of the initiative, other agency groups, such as Public Safety, could adapt the same model.

The state has solidified its commitment to modernizing its technology programs by forming the Virginia Information Technologies Agency’s Innovation Center of Excellence (VITA ICE). Virginia Information Technologies Agency’s Innovation Center of Excellence’s Anthony Wood explained that VITA ICE’s primary goal is to evaluate and implement new technologies by leveraging the capabilities of Virginia’s technology companies. It’s developed a number of resources to establish relationships with Virginia tech companies.

State leadership is also intent on securing internal buy-in and educating government decision makers on the value of big data and analytics. The upcoming Governor’s Data Analytics Summit, an event exclusively for state and local government employees, will feature a lineup of speakers and panelists who will discuss how agencies can overcome challenges and achieve their goals through analytics. The event will offer actionable strategies for scoping and launching analytics projects.

This blog post originally appeared on Qlarion’s website.

Click here to learn more about the Big Data and Analytics Committee.

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Does your brand have a “special sauce” for marketing and attracting new job candidates? This week’s member guest blog is by Insperity Social Media Manager, Recruiting Services, Kara Singh. Singh shares strategies for getting your company noticed in a crowded job market and recruiting top talent. 


insperity-ogIn a recent survey, more than two-thirds of hiring organizations indicated that they’re having a difficult time recruiting for job openings, according to the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM).

With a lower unemployment rate and more job openings, it’s becoming increasingly critical for employers to make sure they get noticed in the crowded job market.

Here’s how to mix up your employer brand, so it begins to stand out.

1. Create a consistent message

Your reputation is everything. You’ve heard it before. But what does that mean in the context of being an employer in a competitive job market?

It means prioritizing the special sauce that is your employer brand. Your employer brand should tell candidates why they should want to work for you.

What makes your company culture so appetizing? Why do your employees want to come to work every day? What do they look forward to? What benefits do they enjoy?

For example, you might find that employees like how your company facilitates a collaborative work environment or that they love your community involvement team activities.

As you answer these questions, you’re beginning to build your employer brand and making your company a more attractive place to work.

2. Define your company culture

Your company culture should attract the employees you want, while repelling those who don’t fit your culture.

While the bones of it should be a reflection of your company’s core mission, vision and values, it’s the real experiences of your employees that are the meat and potatoes of your culture.

That’s why you need to have a management team that walks the walk. For example, do your leaders model your values? Do your values challenge them to do their best every day?

Use employee surveys to take the temperature of your company culture and make sure it’s meeting your standards. Employee feedback can help to ensure your culture isn’t half baked.

When you feel confident that you know and understand what sets your company apart, entice job candidates by sharing the secret ingredients of your culture as you interview.

For instance, if your company places emphasis on corporate responsibility, you might ask a question that lends itself to the topic so you can integrate it naturally into the conversation. You could ask “How do you make a difference in your community?” You can follow up their response with details on how your company gives back.

By offering up these vibrant details, you can create a competitive edge in the job market as you look to fill vacant positions.

3. Define your benefits

Prospective employees want more than just a good work environment. They’re also seeking benefits that are comparable or better than what they’re receiving in their current role. This includes things like health, life and disability insurance, retirement savings plans, and paid time-off.

If you’re a smaller company, you may think you can’t compete with big company benefits. However, there are many perks you might be able to offer that bigger companies don’t.

For example, do you allow flexible work schedules or telecommuting? Do you offer on-site snacks in your break room? Do you have a job shadowing program that can help employees expand their skills?

Special perks can help set your company apart. Be sure to clearly define these extra benefits and share them with potential employees.

4. Develop employee ambassadors

With a great employer brand, company culture and employee benefits, you’d think it’d be a piece of cake finding new talent.

But the truth is that finding good people will still take work. Luckily, you can look to your current workforce for assistance.

You won’t find better ambassadors for your company than your own employees, but you’ll need to guide them to ensure they’re accurately communicating the best attributes of your brand.

To become ambassadors, your employees must be engaged in your business with a commitment to your mission, vision and values. They should easily be able to describe your culture. They should know how to pepper in the perks of their jobs.

With some basic training in these areas, you can easily empower your employees to become brand ambassadors and recruit talent from their own contacts. For example, you might have a training session for employees where you go over company talking points and how to create and manage a LinkedIn presence. Social media offers a great avenue for employees to instantly reach candidates you wouldn’t have access to otherwise.

5. Monitor your reputation on the internet

You wouldn’t expect someone to eat at a restaurant with bad reviews. Why would you expect someone to work for an employer with negative ratings?

Potential job candidates today have access to a vast amount of online information about your company before they even step foot in the door for interviews. You want to make sure this information reflects as positively as possible on your company.

With sites like Glassdoor, an online forum where former employees can describe their experiences with your company, you want to make sure you’re defending your employer brand by telling your side of the story, too. While you can’t undo criticism, you can show your transparency and willingness to listen.

For instance, did a disgruntled employee leave an unsavory comment about his or her experience? Take the time to respond publicly and show potential candidates reading it that you care.

Also, consider setting up Google Alerts to keep tabs on how your brand is represented online. Every time your company name is mentioned online, Google will send you an email alert.

Additionally, keep an eye on social media sites. There are a variety of social monitoring tools available that allow you to follow mentions of your brand.

Keep your eye on the prize

With new strategies in tow, you’re better prepared to take on the competitive landscape.

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When Women Have a Chance in Tech…

March 7th, 2017 | Posted by Alexa Magdalenski in Guest Blogs | Member Blog Posts - (Comments Off)

Our newest member guest blog post is by Elizabeth Lindsey, executive director of Byte Back. Byte Back improves economic opportunity by providing computer training and career preparation to underserved Washington, D.C. metro area residents. 


Byte BackJust 25 percent of the computing workforce in the U.S. is women. For women of color, this drops drastically, with just three percent of the workforce made up of African American women and one percent Latina women.

Only 17 percent of Fortune 500 Chief Information Officer (CIO) positions were held by women in 2015.1

March 8 is International Women’s Day – a day to celebrate progress, recognize deficits and act for equality. Today is the perfect day to give a woman her start in tech.

When women are offered the chance to learn and use technology the same as men, women access vital life opportunities, including high-paying jobs, healthcare, sexual and gender violence services, family care, and more.

With technology, women can connect to the world and build connections to employers, friends and family. With technology, women can move into jobs to support their families – tech jobs, white collar jobs and medial jobs. With technology, women can help their families – teach their children, communicate with teachers and open up a world of knowledge.

It doesn’t have to be expensive, or complicated. So much can be solved by teaching women how to use technology. With a small investment in women’s lives, we can have a huge impact on social change.

Today, we urge you to find a way to support women, whether it’s as a mentor, a volunteer, a supporter of a community organization or as a recruiter. There are countless organizations opening opportunities for women to cross the digital divide and to advance in IT careers, and we encourage you to be a part of this movement.

By 2024, the number of U.S. computing-related job openings expected to be 1.1 million.1 If we all work together, we can make sure women not only fill more technology positions, but have the power to use technology to change lives.


In Byte Back’s 20 years, their demographics have never reflected the outside tech world. Increasing opportunities for underserved residents goes hand-in-hand with increasing diversity in tech companies. In 2016, 417 women, or 61 percent of the student body, found empowering tech skills for free at Byte Back.

1 National Center for Women & Information Technology. (2016). By the Numbers.

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Interested in fine tuning your corporate messaging? Then you’ll want to read our latest member guest blog from Carlos Cruz, Client Relations at TriVision, Inc. TriVision is an award-winning, full service agency that develops innovative strategies to achieve powerful and creative integrated marketing solutions.


Final Logo 2014-2016 TriVision Logo v2It is in a corporation’s best interest to strategically push their value-driven corporate messaging whenever and wherever they can. Here are the reasons why:

Corporate messaging reinforces your target audience’s identity.

People like to associate themselves with others who have the same mindset as they do. It’s like being friends with someone because they like the same hobbies you do.

Corporate messaging builds a community around the same set of values you cherish. In the case of AirBnb, their strategy was to send a message that acceptance of everyone (regardless of race, religion, sexual orientation, or other external factors) is a common human value that most can agree upon (however, at times we may need to be reminded of this).

Create corporate messages that make your target audience proud to associate themselves with you.

Corporate Messaging reinforces brand identity.

When a corporate message is done well and communicated often, those tactics boost brand identity. When a corporate message is value-driven, it often creates a positive association with your company.

Corporate Messaging told as a story, stick better.

Why is it that you are more likely to remember childhood stories like “The Boy Who Cried Wolf” or “The Three Little Pigs” than a 30-page report on whatever it is you specialize in? For 27,000 years, humans have been telling stories to communicate information with one another. Stories connect people. Often, you will find a company’s background explaining why they choose to carry certain values. Blending your corporate messaging with a story will make your company memorable.

Remember, values are what brings all of us together. Make sure that your corporate messaging has a value-driven approach.

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Our newest guest blog is written by C. Michael Ferraro, president and CEO of Training Solutions, Inc. (TSI). TSI provides diverse performance development training programs, human resources services, executive coaching, workforce consulting and facilitation of retreats for a variety of companies across the nation and worldwide. In his blog, Ferraro shares five behaviors for building thriving intact teams.


tsi logoIn most companies, there are ongoing challenges for increased productivity and good employee relationships; and the concept of successful teamwork is always a part of the puzzle. Many companies are uncomfortable looking at team problems. Those companies are aware of the challenges they face with teams trying to work better together, but they don’t know how to “fix” the problems because they don’t know what is causing the problems.

Intact teams really need to thrive. Whether individuals believe it or not, the goals of the team should take priority over individual goals in order to truly succeed. A team should look “inside” itself, being honest about their challenges. There are five key behaviors that every intact team should understand, according to Patrick Lencioni. Lencioni has worked with thousands of senior executives in organizations ranging from Fortune 500 and mid-size companies to start-ups and nonprofits. Lencioni is the author of many best-selling business books including The Five Dysfunctions of a Team that has sold over two million copies and continues to be a fixture on national best-seller lists week after week.

His newest program is called The Five Behaviors of a Cohesive Team (based on his best-selling book, The Five Dysfunctions of a Team). Based on Lencioni’s model, the five key behavioral areas are Trust, Conflict, Commitment, Accountability and Results. Every individual on the team completes an online assessment and then the team report is developed. The assessment-based approach is extremely powerful. I am an authorized partner of this program and work with many teams to improve their working relationships and results.

These five behaviors are very important to the success of team and need to be honestly discussed in depth with the team. I walk through the assessment results with all the team members together and help them work through their challenges as they learn to develop into a stronger and more successful team.

Building Trust. This is a fundamental and foundational behavior of a cohesive team. Lencioni believes that trust means (1) “a willingness to be completely vulnerable with one another” and (2) “confidence among team members that their peers’ intentions are good and that there is no reason to be protective or careful around the team.” Can you say that you know many trusting teams? Teams always need to begin with a discussion regarding trust to be open and honest about their issues. Without high trust, the rest cannot be improved.

Mastering Conflict. Productive conflict is needed to have relationships grow that can last over time. Conflict is needed and shouldn’t be considered “off limits” in the workplace. Healthy and productive conflict is not focused on the individuals but connected to subjects and ideas. Productive conflict should not be avoided. Great teams need thoughtful debates to provide great solutions. When I facilitate this program, we also talk about those unhealthy behaviors around conflict and give the team a team map they can use to help them use conflict constructively.

Achieving Commitment. When talking about commitment, Lencioni is focused on the team’s decisions and making sure there is complete buy-in among every member of the team. Of course, some members may disagree at different points in the discussion; but in the end, there should be complete agreement to move forward with the decision. Great teams understand the importance of the commitment. Without total commitment, there will be ambiguity or missed opportunities or low confidence and more.

Embracing Accountability. This means, per Lencioni, the “willingness of team members to call their peers on performance or behaviors that might hurt the team.” This is very important because team members must feel comfortable sharing their discomfort with another team member about their performance or behavior. This feedback is given from the perspective of wanting to help the team succeed and should be appreciated.

Focusing on Results. Of course, going through the discussions and learning about the four previous behaviors is to produce increased positive results. You’d be surprised how often a team isn’t focused on team results. Perhaps team members are focused on their own individual status, position or results. The collective success of the team is most important.

This assessment-based program will give a team a great opportunity to learn more about each member of the team and how to work better together to be truly a great team. The results we have had with teams has been dramatic, showing better team harmony and increased productivity. We also offer to come back to the team after a period of months and reassess the team in these areas.

To learn more about improving intact teams click here.

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Embracing Big Data

February 2nd, 2017 | Posted by Alexa Magdalenski in Capital Data Summit | Guest Blogs | Member Blog Posts - (Comments Off)

The inaugural 2017 Capital Data Summit is less than two weeks away! Susan Burke, vice president, single family data delivery services at Freddie Mac, will be participating on the Role of the CDO panel at the Summit. In her guest blog post, Burke shares thoughts and questions leaders should consider when aligning big data activities with their organization’s business goals. 


Freddie-Mac-Web-LogoLike many enterprises, we at Freddie Mac are in the process of determining what big data means to us. This past year, we started our journey to expand from the traditional rationalized data stores to the world of unstructured data and new technologies. One step on that path was considering a Hadoop environment. Would it bring value? What business problems would it solve?

The first lesson we learned is one that we tend to see repeated in the IT-business world. In our case, we raced to develop a new technology. Why wouldn’t we, when there were “obvious” value propositions we knew we could deliver? It quickly became apparent that, while our initial proof-of-concept provided insight into what needed to change from a back-end engineering perspective, we had not aligned with the business. Without a strong business champion, technology for the sake of technology efforts is doomed.

Fortunately, a strong, respected business leader stepped up to garner support and help IT define the business-use cases that would deliver value to the organization. Off we went.

Now that we’ve implemented Hadoop, what does it mean? How do we support it? Where do the data scientists fit into this picture? The technology in the data landscape is changing fast — and it is evolving in ways that were unimaginable just a few years ago. That means IT organizations are changing. The skill sets needed are different. The delivery methods are different. The way we integrate into our existing environments is different. We need to ask, “What hypothesis do I want to explore?” instead of “What are the requirements?” And all change is hard.

We decided the most useful model for Freddie Mac is one that combines business and IT resources in one team, so we created our Big Data Center of Excellence (CoE). This CoE brings together dedicated resources to support the development of use cases, deliver data not currently available on the platform and measure value. The data scientists remain in the business areas and can concentrate on asking new questions and executing analytics and visualizations.

The rapidly-evolving world of big data is exciting, and both IT and the business are in it together. We will continue to partner closely with our business leaders to identify the most impactful structure to help us evolve to a data lake structure.

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