May is Mental Health Awareness Month. Innovation Health Chief Medical Officer Sunil Budhrani urges Virginians to start a conversation about mental health. Budhrani moderated the Digital Health panel at NVTC’s Health Care Informatics & Analytics Conference on May 5.


Even for a medical expert, mental health can be a difficult topic to talk about.

I know the terminology, proper treatment plans and resources. But as a society (even among health providers), we often don’t know how to talk to those in need of mental health support – sometimes including ourselves. It’s uncomfortable. It’s emotional. It’s personal. So we don’t share. Don’t ask. Don’t act. And suicide rates across our nation skyrocket.

We need to talk about mental health.

When I joined Innovation Health as Chief Medical Officer last month, I sat down with my team and we made a collective decision. We decided to speak from our own personal experiences with mental health, however imperfectly. Because talking about mental health is the best way to truly help remove the stigma associated with mental health conditions.

Working as an ER doctor, I frequently saw patients whose anxiety and depression had gone unmanaged and ultimately led them to attempt suicide. Some I was able to help. For others there was nothing I could do. I realized that many times these patients weren’t getting the help they needed because they feared being labeled or misunderstood. Time and again, I saw that the cost of not treating these symptoms could be fatal.

Now, after so many years, so many news reports, and seeing so many of my colleagues and friends struggle, it is clear to me that we must confront the topic of mental health head-on if we are truly going to make a difference.

May is Mental Health Awareness Month and I hope it will be a catalyst for this critical conversation, which impacts so many Americans.

The proof is in the numbers: according to the National Institute of Mental Health, nearly one in four adults and one in five children in the U.S.  has a diagnosable mental health condition. In Virginia, more than 230,000 adults – roughly 3.8 percent of the population – have experienced a serious mental illness. These facts tell me one thing; we are not alone. We all know someone, work with someone, or love someone who struggles with mental illness. We may struggle with it ourselves. The fact is that anxiety, depression and substance abuse touch every community. The time to accept this is now. The time to speak up and reach out is now.

Many people don’t get the services they need because they don’t know where to start. If you or someone you know is struggling, you can start the healing process by following these three steps:

  1. Talk to a primary care physician about your mental health. They can help connect you with the right mental health support. If you do not have a PCP, I highly recommend you select one for your general health care needs.
  2. Educate yourself. Visit the Innovation Health website to take a depression or anxiety assessment or call 703-289-7560 to schedule an in-person assessment with a trained counselor.
  3. Be proactive about mental well-being. If you know someone who may be experiencing symptoms related to a mental health condition, encourage them to get the help they need.

It is never easy or comfortable to approach situations like this, but as a community we can’t let our fear or doubts stop us from helping others or ourselves dealing with mental illness. Talk about metal health with your family, friends and colleagues not just this month, but all year.

Together we can work to build a healthier world. But first, we have to start the conversation.

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As companies try to keep employees healthy and lower the overall cost of care, it is important that employers bring back the tradition of the primary care physician (PCP). Whether you are the HR director in charge of selecting health plans for your company or the CEO who is paying them, Amy Turner, executive director and COO of Innovation Health, provides the top four reasons you should be advocating for your employees to engage with a PCP. 


We all remember the days of the HMO plan – limited care options that left many employees looking for more choice and access to care for themselves and their families. To help meet this employee request many HR directors began looking toward PPO plans, which offered larger networks of doctors and specialists, but at a higher cost than the HMO plans. Today, employees want the same options, but with the increase in high-deductible health plans, many of them are also taking a closer look at cost.

As someone who has been in the health industry for more than a decade, I have seen a lot of changes take place, but one that strikes me as imperative to address is the lack of people who have, and engage with, a primary care physician (PCP). Plan options and policy changes aside, in the past people relied on family doctors for everything. Doctors intimately knew a family’s history, often treating several generations of family members. As we try to keep our employees healthy and lower the overall cost of care, it is important that we bring this tradition back with the PCP.

Whether you are the HR director in charge of selecting health plans for your company or the CEO who is paying them, here are the top four reasons you should be advocating for your employees to engage with a PCP!

They are focused on preventive care

A PCP can be your employee’s main health care provider for their most common medical problems. But they also look out for your employee’s overall health, recommend screenings, make referrals and encourage healthy habits.

They help maintain good health

A PCP provides employees with continual care. And that’s what good health maintenance over a lifetime requires. PCPs can treat the whole person, taking into account both your employee’s history and existing conditions.

They serve as an important point of contact and resource

PCPs are personal doctors who can coordinate care. That takes stress off your employees as their doctors are ready to make sure their best interests are met. Furthermore, they are often the first people  your employees can contact when they have a question or a problem. He or she can provide answers and care, or recommend a specialist when needed.

They help keep costly ER visits down

Because they will be your employees’ first line of defense, PCPs can answer questions, call in a prescription or even suggest the action your employees should take.  This will help them to avoid costly ER visits as they are able to manage any health issues before they escalate.

Once your employees select a PCP, make sure they are aware that under the Affordable Care Act they’re entitled to one, free yearly checkup. You read that correctly – every single employee you have can receive one free check-up a year.  This is something all of them should take advantage of. So, if you aren’t doing it already, please express to your employees the importance of building a PCP relationship and getting a yearly checkup. Not only will their health likely improve, but it could save your company and themselves valuable dollars.

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Most countries have a centralized model for managing healthcare supplies, but there is room for other options. This week on NVTC’s blog, LMI’s Taylor Wilkerson outlines three models that can help you choose the best option for your national healthcare system.


Most countries have a centralized model for managing healthcare supplies, but there is room for other options. The following decision tree can help you choose the best option for your national healthcare system. Note that all three models assume that contracts with vendors have been centrally negotiated to ensure bulk pricing. Determine the best model for your healthcare supply chain with three questions.


If your best option is a Vendor-Managed Inventory Model, vendors own and maintain the medical supply inventories at facilities around your country and are responsible for inventory fulfillment. Pricing is based on pre-negotiated bulk contracts.

Key Benefits

  • You don’t have to manage transportation or storage of supplies.
  • Since inventories are stored in facilities around your country, your healthcare supply system may be more flexible in times of disaster.

Key Disadvantages

  • To ensure standardized levels of care across the country, this model requires clearly defined management processes and data systems.
  • Analysis is needed to know whether vendor delivery costs would be more and less than one managed by your administration.

If you choose the Vendor-Managed Delivery Model, vendors manage delivery of supplies around your country. Districts, counties, or facilities place direct orders with vendors, with pricing based on pre-negotiated bulk contracts. The pricing includes delivery costs.

Key Benefits

  • You don’t have to manage transportation of supplies.
  • In case of disaster, the flexibility of your healthcare supplies depends on the resilience of your vendor’s delivery systems.

Key Disadvantages

  • To ensure standardized levels of care across the country, this model requires clearly defined management processes and data systems.
  • Analysis is needed to know whether vendor delivery costs would be more and less than one managed by your administration.

If your best option is a Centralized Inventory Model, you hold all inventory in a central warehouse and ship to medical facilities as needed.

 

Key Benefits

  • With all supplies are in one location, you can easily track inventory, even if you have not been able to invest in sophisticated data systems.
  • You may be able to negotiate the least expensive warehouse costs, since you need only one facility.
  • There is lower risk of running out of one type of supply, since overall inventory is larger than when it is stored regionally.

Key Disadvantage

  • In times of disaster, having all supplies in one location could make your healthcare system vulnerable.

Mr. Wilkerson heads the Global Health group at LMI. Mr. Wilkerson co-chairs the Supply Chain Risk Leadership Council and chairs the Penn State Center for Supply Chain Research advisory board. He has an MBA from the University of Maryland, and BE in mechanical engineering from Vanderbilt University.

Mr. Colaianni works in the Global Health group at LMI and manages supply management systems and policy. Formerly, Mr. Colaianni was an Army officer and managed the medical equipment program for Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Most countries have a centralized model for managing healthcare supplies, but there is room for other options. This week on NVTC’s blog, LMI’s Taylor Wilkerson outlines three models that can help you choose the best option for your national healthcare system. 

 

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Preparing for Genomics and Health Data Analytics

February 1st, 2016 | Posted by Sarah Jones in Guest Blogs - (Comments Off)

This week on NVTC’s Blog, LMI Senior Consultant Daniel DuBravec notes that we need to prepare for personalized medicine and the evaluation of genomic data.


Today’s electronic health record (EHR) systems cannot properly handle genomic data. Interpreting these huge and complex data, particularly in a visual manner, is challenging. Even when EHR systems can access these data, few standards exist for how to structure them to ensure seamless system integration, interoperability, and interpretation. Most medical schools do not teach doctors how to interpret genetic data, and local-level care centers require training on proper data storage and network security.

Precision medicine predicts, prevents, and treats diseases at the patient level. Its growth has created the need for internationally recognized genomic EHR standards and policies, which would protect individuals by ultimately improving patient outcomes. We need to prepare for a future in which medicine is more personalized and better able to evaluate genomic data. 

Real, Inspiring Stories

Recently, I met a colleague whose daughter is suffering from a genetic condition known as Stargardt disease. Sadly, her daughter is rapidly losing her vision. This disease, a form of juvenile macular degeneration, can only appear in children when both parents carry the mutated gene. If the gene had been identified at an early stage, medical practitioners would have had more time to investigate new drug therapies and gene-editing technologies to treat my colleague’s daughter. As part of her interoperable medical genetic record, physicians at research institutions who were also working on her case could have then viewed and collaborated by using this critical information. Hitting close to home, this is one of many stories that inspire us to prepare for the widespread application of precision medicine and genomic data analysis.

Making Genomic Data Useful for Medical Practitioners

The future of patient care requires connecting large external data sets with electronic healthcare records. Precision medicine will customize treatments down to a patient’s genes and behavior. By analyzing genetic data across thousands of people, scientists will discover preventative treatments and cures for challenging health issues.

Given the complexity of health and genomic data, one can analyze the same data in different ways and achieve different outcomes. “Well-designed data visualization could help doctors interpret the data more rapidly, arriving at more challenging diagnoses in less time,” says Erin Gordon, data visualization trainer and graphic facilitator at LMI.

Before developing a framework for integrating and analyzing disparate health data sets, we test our models for validity. “The quality of our medical data models has a direct impact on patient outcomes and daily operations in medical facilities,” says Brent Auble, a consultant with the Intelligence Programs group at LMI. To support LMI’s research into healthcare data management, our team set up a Hadoop cluster, which is a group of servers designed to quickly analyze massive quantities of structured and unstructured data.

Building the Future of Healthcare Analytics

Ultimately, to meet the growth in precision medicine and the use of health data analytics, future EHR systems need to:

  • automatically generate comparisons of multiple genomes,
  • identify and match genetic variants based on known diseases,
  • ensure patient data privacy, and
  • integrate and search medical publications and scientific research for relevant patient data.

Preparation is key in order to predict, prevent, and treat disease as medicine evolves.


Dan DuBravec is a senior consultant at LMI, leading IT implementation projects. Mr. DuBravec holds multiple EHR certifications, as well as a BS in product design from Illinois State University and an MS in educational technology leadership from George Washington University.

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Four Health Insurance Trends to Watch for in 2016

January 19th, 2016 | Posted by Sarah Jones in Guest Blogs - (Comments Off)

This week on NVTC’s Blog, Innovation Health CEO Dave Notari identifies key health insurance trends to consider in 2016.


As the healthcare industry continues to evolve, it is important for business owners to know where it is headed, and adjust accordingly to meet their needs. To make sure you and your business are best able to prepare for the year ahead, here are my top four predictions for the New Year and beyond.

Shift from volume of care to value of care

Over the past few decades doctors had been compensated based on the number of services they provided to people, rather than the outcomes those services produced. Recently, we have seen a shift in this approach. Increasingly, employees and companies are paying doctors for the quality of the care provided – i.e., keeping patients healthier and helping them to better manage their care. In 2016 we can expect to see this overall “quantity” trend continue to die out across the country. This is good news for your employees’ health and your business.

In 2016 you will have access to more health plans focusing on cost-effective care. Since these are specifically designed to keep your employees healthier and out of the emergency room, they could save your business quite a bit on unnecessary copays and premium payments. As we move into the New Year, be sure to talk to your broker and be on the lookout for health plans focusing on value-based care.

Alignment of health plans and providers

For too long, health insurers and health providers have been on different teams. Health plans are in the business of managing risk, and they have looked to reduce the number of claims paid to providers in an effort to improve their revenue. This approach put many hospitals and physicians at odds with health plans; the approach simply wasn’t working. Fast forward to today and businesses and employees now have access to health plans that work to reduce risk by improving member health. This means that the health plan, doctors and hospitals are all on the same team and working together to achieve what is best for the individual.

Given the industry success this approach has seen, moving forward there will be more health plans partnering with hospitals and physician networks. As you select your coverage in the future, be sure to look for these collaborative plans in your area. They could improve employee health and save your business money for years to come.

Increased role of the consumer in healthcare

Since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) people have become more involved in their healthcare decisions, demanding plans that are transparent, easy to access and understand, and are affordable. In 2016 these expectations, and employee involvement in the health plan selection process, will become the norm. This means that moving forward your business will need to find plans that address those specific employee wants and needs.

To make sure you’re paying for the care that is most valuable to your workforce, look for plans with access to easy online enrollment, clear language in the plan descriptions and on-the-go tools that can help them look up the cost of a local MRI visit or the copay at a nearby physician’s office. Moving forward, those plans will be most valuable to your employees.

Continued growth of private exchanges

Bottom line: people like to be able to customize the things they buy. It is for this very reason that 6 million people selected health plans through private exchanges in 2015. Looking ahead, I think we can expect this number to rise. Why? Because private exchanges allow employees to choose the health plan that works best for them and, as I mentioned  earlier, that choice is very important these days.

The great news about private exchange growth is that it can be really good for businesses. Despite the recent implementation delay of the Cadillac Tax, many employers are trying to find ways to move away from rich benefit plans, while still offering employees the coverage they want. Moving to a private exchange means employees can choose the care they want at the price they want without employers being penalized. Because of the “win-win” they offer you can expect to see more businesses taking advantage of the private exchange option in the coming years.

The key to success in any business lies in our ability to adapt. With each year comes new challenges and opportunities to improve the care we provide our employees. By preparing for these four trends you can ensure your business is prepared and your employees have the care they need for a healthy and prosperous 2016.

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This week on NVTC’s Blog, Business Development, Marketing & Sales Vice Chair Jenny Couch of member company Providge Consulting shares critical changes to the IT landscape that your healthcare organization needs to have on its radar.


These days, technology seems to advance too rapidly for most of us to keep up. It’s certainly moving too rapidly for organizations to keep up with every single one of the “hot” trends.

healthITIn the noisy field of today’s latest tech, it’s all too easy to get caught up in the buzzwords and lists of “This Year’s Hottest IT Trends”, and miss the truly critical changes to the IT landscape that your organization needs to have on its radar.

The healthcare industry is uniquely positioned to be impacted by a convergence of critical IT trends within the coming years. But with budgets decreasing, and resource pools shrinking, it’s more challenging than ever to prioritize IT needs within the healthcare space.

We’ve highlighted the top five technology trends healthcare organizations must have on their radar in 2016.

  1. Cloud computing. Whether it’s a pharmaceutical company needing to store large amounts of data from clinical trials, or a hospital with a newly implemented EHR system, healthcare organizations of all kinds are increasingly turning to cloud computing for a variety of uses. According to Healthcare Informatics, the global healthcare cloud computing market is expected to reach $9.5 billion by 2020. And 83 percent of healthcare organizations are already leveraging the cloud. Only 6 percent of organizations have no plans to take advantage of the cloud in the coming years. If you’re in that 6 percent, it’s time to reconsider your plans. Cloud computing can be used to decrease costs, improve access, and create a better user experience for any healthcare organization. But, it’s critical that your organization take a strategic approach to moving to the cloud. Learn more about how you can leverage the cloud to best support your organization here. 
  2. The Internet of Things. Take a look at that FitBit on your wrist. Think about the incredible amount of data that one tiny device is generating constantly. The number of steps you take, the calories you burn, your sleep pattern, the stairs you climbed. These devices get more accurate and more intricate with every passing day. We are not far off from a future when we’ll be able to monitor nearly every aspect of our health, and the health of our loved ones without setting foot in a doctor’s office. Healthcare organizations will have to find a way to address what will be tectonic shift in how care is delivered. Communication methods will need to be established to collect the data generated by wearable and mobile devices. Methods for collecting and analyzing the influx of data will need to be developed so patterns can be identified. The manner in which treatment is delivered will have to change as we move away from the traditional doctor’s office visits, and into a world where a diagnosis can be made through analyzing the information generated through a patient’s mobile device, car, appliances, wearables, etc. And while this future may not quite be a reality, it’s coming soon, and healthcare organizations need to start preparing today.
  3. Data Explosion. Big data. Data analytics. Whatever term you use, the unparalleled rise in the amount and accessibility of data over the past few years is certain to have a massive impact on the healthcare industry. The explosion in big data occurred so quickly that 41 percent of healthcare executives say their data volume has increased by 50 percent or more from just one year ago. 50 percent in just one year. This incredible increase in data will allow medical professionals to more quickly and more accurately diagnose patients, but as with the Internet of Things, it will require fundamental shifts in how data is managed and how care is administrated. Healthcare organizations will need to train, or hire a workforce with the right data analysis  and medical skill sets. Regulations, processes, and platforms will need to be developed or implemented. Healthcare organizations who ignore this trend do so at their own peril. For as Accenture notes in a report released earlier this year for those who take advantage of the wealth of opportunity within big data, “Greater operational excellence and improved clinical outcomes await those who grasp the upside potential.”
  4. Efficiency in IT. If you haven’t heard the phrase “Doing more with less”  in the past few months, it’s probably time to climb out from under that rock you’ve been living under. With healthcare spending wildly out of control in the United States, every healthcare organization from physician’s offices to the largest hospital chains are being asked to do more with less. IT is a particularly ripe area for cutting costs, and resources. In 2016, the emphasis on doing more with less in IT will continue. Expect to see IT departments pursue options such as moving to the cloud, outsourced managed services, and bring your own device to help decrease IT operating costs.
  5. Cybersecurity. In 2014, 42 percent of all serious data breaches occurred at healthcare organizations. Sadly, this trend is certain to continue its upward trajectory in the coming years. Healthcare organizations who have not adequately upgraded their systems, and developed a thorough cybersecurity strategy are especially vulnerable to attack. Now is time to evaluate your systems, processes, and resourcing. Make sure your organization is positioned to proactively protect against attacks where possible, and identify and respond rapidly to breaches when they do occur.

Planning your 2016 health IT projects and priorities? Looking for a partner that will truly understand the challenges you are facing and the need to ensure success? Get in touch with us today. Our experienced health IT experts know the obstacles you face, and are ready to partner with you to deliver your projects on time, and on budget in 2016 and beyond.


Jenny Couch

This post was written by Jenny Couch. Couch is a project management consultant, and Providge’s Business Development Manager. She loves efficiency, to-do lists, and delivering projects on-time and on-budget.

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This week on NVTC’s blog, Innovation Health CEO Dave Notari shares how health IT has made serious progress, closing communication and care gaps.


The healthcare industry hasn’t traditionally been known as an early adopter when it comes to implementing the latest technology – as folks in the heart of the Northern Virginia technology community know all too well. But over the past few years we’ve made some serious progress.

Dave Notari

Dave Notari

Since the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was signed into law there’s been a dramatic national up-tick in the use of personal health technology (think Fitbit!), as well as technology designed to help consumers navigate the healthcare system and make better choices on behalf of their families.

When technology is implemented within a progressive and proactive health care management model, we start to close communication and care gaps, reduce medical errors and encourage healthy habits. Northern Virginia is a hub of tech innovation, and technology is poised to improve the health care experience for residents in three very important ways over the next few years.

Improving Health Literacy

In early 2015 a Kaiser Family Foundation survey [1] found that there were 11 million newly insured adults as of December 2014. For some, it may have been their first experience with enrolling for health coverage and having to learn a wide array of health and health benefits terms. Health care language can be difficult to understand, and with high deductible health plans (HDHP)s  on the rise, understanding coverage needs and what is available in-network is more vital than ever before. With the right consumer tools and simpler language, health providers and businesses can make health information clearer to consumers, aid decision-making, and ensure that they are informed and able to choose the plan that works best for them and their family.

Many of us expect that buying and selecting our health plan should be as easy as buying a pair of shoes—as insurers begin to implement this type of technology we can expect that to become more of a reality.

Improving the Quality of Care

When it comes to improving the overall quality of Northern Virginia healthcare, technology provides opportunities for better coordination and collaboration among key stakeholders.  Our health care system today is characterized by fragmentation, inefficiency and waste. In addition, it’s not as convenient or connected as it could be. Deploying technology to connect hospitals, physicians and providers would transform the way healthcare is currently delivered and provide numerous benefits to NOVA consumers.

Take, for example, someone who needs to see a specialist. Before electronic health records (EHRs) and technology that allows doctors to electronically share patient health information were available a Primary Care Physician (PCP) would have to fax the patient’s chart to a specialist, the patient or doctor would have to call to ensure the information arrived, and if it did not the patient would have to rely on her memory to recount for the doctor her entire medical history. Today, doctors using EHRs and health information exchange technology have the ability to seamlessly coordinate their patients’ care and share critical patient data, which lessens the hassle factor for patients. Additionally, certain technologies can even allow patients to review their own secure personal health records, pinpoint in-network doctors and facilities, get cost-saving pop-up alerts and use digital ID cards for all of their check-ups and appointments.

Beyond making patient health records more accessible, technology can also help identify patients who may be at risk of certain conditions or those with potential gaps in care so doctors can act to prevent complications.

Lowering Costs

Technology has the ability to help consumers understand the cost of services before they are actually accessed—something I personally found useful a few months ago when my son was in need of a CT scan. My wife was referred to a doctor, and like most moms was going off of the doctor’s recommendation without any insight into places she could have the CT performed or what the cost would be at different facilities. This is pretty common. Using a health care payment estimator tool I was able to find all of the different care sites and costs in a five-mile radius of our home.  The result? My son received a CT scan for $250 rather than the doctor’s recommended site which was $600. Since I have a HDHP, I saved an additional outlay of $350—all thanks to technology!

It is safe to assume that technology is going to transform the healthcare space. By continuing to look for and implement new technologies and solutions we have the ability to improve patient and employer education, improve health outcomes, and save money on health costs.

[1] Rachel Garfield, Katherine Young, Adults who Remained Uninsured at the End of 2014, (The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2015), Issue Brief

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3 Reasons Why M&A Will Continue to Thrive in 2015

February 17th, 2015 | Posted by Sarah Jones in Guest Blogs | Member Blog Posts - (Comments Off)

This week on NVTC’s blog, guest blogger Gretchen Guandolo of member company Clearsight Advisors discusses the success of M&A in 2014 with the return of gargantuan deals, largely seller-friendly transaction structures and premium valuations, and offers three reasons why 2015 will be just as successful.


dollar-exchange-rate-544949_1280In what was widely considered a banner year for M&A, 2014 was the return of gargantuan deals, largely seller-friendly transaction structures and premium valuations. In spite of the turbulent equity markets being driven by fluctuating oil prices, a gathering storm in Europe, and uncertainty around rising interest rates, we at Clearsight are already seeing the makings of a very big M&A year. Globally, investment banks are seeing increased deal flow and expanding pipelines. Our team is already out to market with several deals that are garnering high demand and premium valuations from a number of unique buyer groups. We expect the rising M&A tide to continue through 2015, as we believe demand for niche leadership positioning, strong growth trajectories, and seasoned management teams is unlikely to dissipate. First, a few fun facts from 2014 that will continue the momentum through 2015:

  • In 2014 there was $3.5 trillion worth of global M&A activity, which is up 47 percent from the year before
  • Global private equity investments totaled at $561.9 billion. That’s the highest figure since 2007, and a 43 percent bump over 2013 – with 60 percent of 2014 buyout activity focused on add-on investments
  • Venture capitalists disbursed a massive $87.8 billion (compared to $50.3 billion for 2013) via 7,731 deals
  • Companies raised around $249 billion in global IPOs in 2014, which was the busiest year for new listings since 2010

So what do we expect for this year?

  • There is likely to be a frenzy of activity in certain verticals, including: healthcare, energy and technology. Technology continues apace with no sign of slowdown and while the energy sector is harder to predict, one thing is clear – disruption in a regulated industry makes for a great M&A environment
  • Investor interest in certain technologies is likely to grow. Some of our favorites include: customer experience, big data, and human capital management. Technologies that enable us to get into the minds of customers and lead them on a journey to experience and buy a product has become the goal of retailers, financial services companies and even government! We see the market of big data continue to evolve and mature. This year will be a great growth year for data analytics consulting businesses who leverage Hadoop and other open source technologies to deliver predictive behavior, lower costs and drive increased revenue. Human capital technologies will continue to surge as employers seek out the best talent and retain and train individuals in a hyper competitive market.
  • As seen in 2014, both private equity and strategic acquirers will drive robust market competition. Nearly all of our processes include both strategic and financial buyers and as private equity grows increasingly aggressive in pricing in an effort to put money to work, we see strategic buyers dominating 2015.

Growth will continue to be the main driver of valuations throughout 2015. Premium multiples go to the companies with a demonstrated high growth track record and robust pipeline for future growth. Growth eclipses profitability through 2015.

 

 

 

 

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