This week on NVTC’s blog, Marty Herbert of NeoSystems Corp. shares the second in a series of tips for workflow and process automation.


In Part 1 of our Workflow and Process Automation Series, Re-evaluating Your Processes, we looked at a few steps your organization can take towards drastically simplifying your billing process. Keep in mind that throughout this series, I will highlight solutions which produce time saving, compliance-driven processes that integrate with business systems, like Deltek Costpoint, NetSuite, SAP or others and create an enhanced workflow automation framework. In today’s post, Part 2 of our series, we’ll address vendor invoice processing.

A few years back, while working on a series of consulting projects, I looked at a client’s AP department while performing an audit and noted several variations they employed to process their vendor invoices. Some invoices came in via email, others via snail mail. Some came in to the attention of the company’s AP department; others came in via the project manager. Some were based on a PO and others were one-off ‘bills that needed to be paid.’ Knowing who the appropriate approver is could be multi-faceted and involve the receipt of goods (or services). Similar to many larger government contractors, our client used Deltek Costpoint for vendor invoice processing so I will use that system as an example of a well-known business system that is largely identifiable for our audience.

This business system has a great mechanism for capturing data and information related to accounts payable, but it can’t necessarily control how invoices are delivered, who approves them, and how that approval is captured for compliance purposes.

Our client’s overarching goal (outside of employing processes that increased efficiency and effectiveness) was to find a way to electronically interface an APPROVED invoice for vouchering in Costpoint. That sounds like a simple objective, but there are nuances that might not be immediately obvious. The “approved” aspect implies that there needs to be a process followed to obtain a valid, recognized approval. The “electronic” aspect implies that the entry into the ERP system should be automated without the need for manual data entry. Automated work flow tools make the design and controlled execution of a process possible, while Costpoint Web Services enables an electronic interface.

But, let’s slow down. Before we send data along, we have to gather the data. In this case the data comes from a vendor’s invoice, but we want to make sure the vendor’s invoice has been reviewed and approved before we send it into the system of record. The first step in automating this process is to gather the data input (the invoices). There are multiple ways we could approach this:

  • We can give vendors access to a “portal” whereby they upload the invoice directly into a workflow, or vendors can email the invoice to a specific address that will automate process kick-off and move it into a queue for AP servicing, or
  • We can receive a vendor invoice and initiate the process by loading it to the AP queue (potentially after scanning it in if it is received hard copy).

Then it is time to route the invoice to the proper ‘approver.” If companies are already connected to an ERP application that supports project management data, they are able to use the data inherent to any given project to pull the relevant approvers for PO-based invoices. AP clerks will then have matched the invoice to a PO (unless the vendor did that already) and chosen the lines from the PO to which the invoice applies then… well, that is all they have had to do so far.

Off to the approver(s) the invoice goes. The approver gets the invoice that has been submitted as well as details added by the AP department. The approver can decide to reject it or send it to another approver, or sit on it a while. Any (or all) of these tasks can be built into the process. The end result is (hopefully) an approved invoice.

At this point, the system should validate the invoice information and manage the voucher process through creation, voucher number generation, accept or reject status and check generation. It is critical and most efficient to have a complete trail of activity from submission to payment.

This process, when automated, is extremely easy to follow, saves time and money and is easier to implement than one might think. Unfortunately, most government contractors don’t know the ease with which automation software can achieve this and many other processes quickly and effectively.

There are numerous effective workflow management software systems in the market today. Integrify, a workflow management software used to automate a myriad of processes within a variety of platforms, is one tool we use at NeoSystems to automate vendor invoice processing within the business systems we use.

Our next blog will focus on the delightful automation of purchase requisition. If you have any burning questions about this or other processes (even those we haven’t gotten to yet!) using web services and workflow management software for your business system, please feel free to contact me.

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This week on NVTC’s blog, Marty Herbert of NeoSystems Corp. shares the first in a series of tips for workflow and process automation.


Marty HIf you are an ERP user, you likely know that most applications are rich with many features that address the nuances of running projects, especially if you are a government contractor.  However, no application can address the many steps that an organization must go through to accomplish what might be seen on the surface as a simple task.

Take ‘billing’ for example. I was asked a while back to determine how to route a bill for approval, and I thought it would be a “piece of cake”. Create bill. Send to approver. Get approval. Bill is right – Send to customer. Bill is wrong – rinse and repeat.  For this article, we’ll use commonly known GovCon ERP, Deltek Costpoint, as an example.  This system is very good at the first part. If you need to create a bill, you can create bill replete with support for hours worked and costs incurred. The problem, however, is there is no nice and simple way of implementing a workflow process that will accommodate most organization’s review and approval routines within the ERP framework.  That’s not a knock against Costpoint, no ERP systems on the market adequately address this issue, especially when you magnify it by the many, many other processes, that an organization has in place to accomplish their back office routines.

Over the next six weeks we will be taking a look at several areas where workflow plays a big role and how to leverage the automation of workflows via integration with your ERP. Companies unaware of how to automate in these areas are wasting precious time in determining the process, missing steps and ultimately don’t know how to streamline efficiencies that will save them money down the road.

In our first post for “Evaluating Your Process for Users of Deltek Costpoint or a Similar System,” I’ll examine the role of an AR clerk with my ‘piece of cake’ attempt at automating bill routing.

I had bills created from our ERP and I had Outlook, so I sent two bills to their respective approvers to verify hours were correct so we could bill the services to the client. Then I waited and waited and waited and waited… you get the picture. I followed up via email at least three times over the next week and finally, a week later, I knocked on their doors to see if they had time to review the email I sent.

‘Approver 1′ called me to his desk and had me look at the count of emails in his inbox. Until then, I was unaware that this number could go over 9,999, but there it was. I apologized and helped him find my email. Five minutes later he reviewed it and sent me an email saying we could bill it. Finally, the bill was out the door. I don’t remember whether I had to mail it or email it, but that is of no consequence. Oh, and of course, I forgot to tell my supervisor that I got the bill out the door so she was unnecessarily on my case the next morning.  I’ll try not to make that mistake again.

‘Approver 2′ (let’s call her Amy), asked if I had received her email. She said she responded immediately to each of the messages I sent, so I crept back to my cube and found her responses.  Suddenly I was the culprit in slowing down my own process! “Sorry, this Acme project isn’t mine,” she said. “These should go to Janet, she runs the Acme project.” Ugh! Wouldn’t you know she didn’t even have the courtesy to copy Janet on her response to me. So I just trudged down the hall to Janet’s office and had her review the paper copy. She looked at it briefly and said “yep, looks fine.” Great, I was out her door and happy to get the bill out of the door. Never mind that I forgot to get Janet to initial the invoice to indicate she had approved it and, of course, I forgot to tell my supervisor I sent the bill.  But, hey…bill is out the door, case closed.

Actually, the case was just getting started. The following week, in walks my supervisor. “I got a call from Acme Company’s CFO.  She asked me who Francis Miller was and why we were billing Acme for her travel to Las Vegas.  When I look in our system, this bill isn’t even posted, when did you send it out? Did you get Amy to review and approve this before you sent it out?” Sorry, I said, I forgot to post the bill in the system, and Amy said the project really belongs to Janet, so I got her to review and approve it…..see (as I pulled my copy from the file drawer). But, of course, Janet’s initials weren’t there.  Now my boss is mad at me for sending out an invoice that she thinks I didn’t get reviewed AND I forgot to post it. Swell.

I realized there was A LOT of room for improvement in this process. Problem #1, people are swarmed with email. Problem #2, people change roles and responsibilities a lot. Problem #3, no coordination with the ERP and the approval activities.  Problem #4, I can be my own worst enemy. Why couldn’t all this stuff be linked together somehow, and why isn’t there a way to get things posted in the system without me having to remember every little thing. I’m only human, after all. And this was a simple bill.  I could only imagine – or rather didn’t want to in this case – what would have happened if there had been revisions.

From experience I’ve gathered intelligence on how to sidestep these common pitfalls. Apart from working together as a team, companies always think in terms of making changes to their IT infrastructure. What I believe needs to happen is approaching these pitfalls in terms of changing the process infrastructure. There are no short term ‘quick fix’ changes, but rather logical steps toward automating manual processes that run at the heart of their businesses.Workflow

Step 1

Get people out of email and into a single system for approvals. This will help solve problem #1 and 3. By logging in to a single system for approvals, the approver should be able to get to a “To Do” list that helps them focus on the task(s) at hand. A system that alerts ONLY when an approval is required, and only when this task is “past due,” can assist in decreasing problem #1.

Step 2

Link your system to Deltek Costpoint or a similar platform! Not only does it save time from transferring information into Outlook, but it also ensures that the information will not be incorrectly entered or failed to be entered. Additionally, users can maintain project leads in Costpoint, and can link to a user in the system to automatically assign the approver to the person(s) involved in any given approval process. Problems #2 and 3 solved.

Step 3

Create a workflow that allows for rework, rejection, and handles the issues and items that may need to be addressed when something is “wrong.” That way, the stakeholders that need to be involved can be included automatically based on roles, or by selecting a user from a list of possible issues/departments involved. This decreases the amount of emails sent out for approvals. Assigning a task and automating reminders in the system accomplishes all these things.

Step 4

Solve Problem #4.  Remove yourself from your enemy list.  Relax. Stay out of email. Work on other things. Seriously. At a recent conference I attended, it was estimated that we spend around 28 percent of our work time sending or reading emails. What happens when you remove a single work stream worth of emails from your list of things to do? You can get back a piece of that time to work on other more pressing issues.

If it sounds like I’ve been through this process at least a few times, it’s because I have. Using the power of a business process management tool called Integrify, NeoSystems has automated this and other processes and tied those processes to Costpoint and similar platforms. Throughout this series, I will highlight the ways we have implemented, envisioned, and produced time-saving, compliance-driven processes that integrate with your ERP to create an Enhanced Workflow Automation Framework.

Have burning questions about Process Automation? Feel free to contact me ahead of next week’s blog post.

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10 Keys to Small Business Teaming

April 20th, 2015 | Posted by Sarah Jones in Guest Blogs - (Comments Off)

This week on NVTC’s blog, Jim McCarthy of member company AOC Key Solutions shares how small businesses can gain a market foothold, offset vulnerabilities, obtain site knowledge, open doors to a larger key personnel pool, or spread risks and bid costs through teaming. McCarthy provides ten keys to developing contracting relationships.


Instances of the “lone wolf” pursuit of a government contract by a single prime contractor are vanishing. Today, multi-company teaming arrangements are more the rule than the exception. Companies now team to gain a market foothold, offset vulnerabilities, obtain site knowledge, open doors to a larger key personnel pool, or spread risks and bid costs.

For small businesses (SBs) especially, a teaming arrangement may be the most viable strategy for growth and prosperity. Too often, however, despite best efforts, SBs fail to land on a team. Or worse perhaps, lacking leverage as they cut deals with the prime that are just empty promises. What is a SB to do?

Try these 10 keys to small business teaming:

  1. Isolate on a primary need of the agency. This requires diligent research and early market intelligence.
  2. Establish a relationship with the customer with the need. Persistence and patience are paramount to gain face time.
  3. Get smarter about the need than anyone. Invest time and energy to do your homework.
  4. Devise and package a solution to meet the need. Solve the problem. Provide the features of your plan, but be sure to focus on customer benefits. Test-drive your plan with the customer.
  5. Hit the streets to spark interest. Contact every potential prime interested in the opportunity. For bait, tell the prime that you alone have the solution to the customer’s pain.
  6. Set the hook. Forecast how you can earn the prime N number of evaluation points by solving the customer’s problem. Be bold yet credible.
  7. Gain leverage. Hint at your solution — but give details only in exchange for a place on the team. But not just any place. Insist on precise terms in writing — a set scope of work (“swim lane”) with a guaranteed level of effort contingent upon contract award to your prime. Be prepared to walk. If one prime will not play ball, go to another.
  8. Offer something else value-added. Deliver a subject matter expert to help with the proposal. At no cost, prepare 100 percent compliant proposal text for your swim lane. Cover your own B&P costs. Participate for free on color review teams. Offer a candidate key person for bidding. Fund your transition costs if the team is successful.
  9. Sign your deal. Not just a handshake, but get the terms and conditions in writing. Execute non-disclosure agreements and non-competes.
  10. Deliver. Don’t forget to circle back to your original customer to inform him/her that you will be delivering your solution as part of [name of prime contractor]‘s powerful team. Then meet your commitments just as you would expect the prime to meet its promises.

There is no free lunch. Give something of value to get something of value. Appeal to the best competitive instincts of the primes. Deliver what counts: as a team member present additional evaluation points that make the difference in winning. In so doing, not only do you meet a primary need of the government, but you earn (and deserve) a legitimate place at the team table.


Jim McCarthy is the founder and principal of AOC Key Solutions, a proposal consulting firm dedicated to helping companies win government contracts. Mr. McCarthy’s career spans over 30 years of proposal development, market strategy, and oral presentation coaching to federal contractors. Learn more at www.aockeysolutions.com

For more information on what NVTC has to offer for small businesses and entrepreneurs, check out the NVTC Small Business and Entrepreneur Committee. The committee hosts various programs, including a yearly teaming and contracting event for small companies interested in government contracting. At the event, small businesses can discuss partnering or subcontracting with large companies and meet with government agencies and their small business offices from the federal, state and local level about how to do business with them. 

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This week on NVTC’s blog, member company Venable shares “The Limitation on Subcontracting and Small Business Subcontracting Plans,”part 1 of their five part series on the SBA’s Proposed Rules to Implement the 2013 NDAA. 


The current limitation on subcontracting rule, or the “50 percent rule,” requires small business prime contractors on set-aside services contracts to incur no less than 50 percent of the cost of performance for labor. A similar methodology applies to materials and construction contracting. To implement requirements of the 2013 NDAA, the SBA proposes to alter the rule as follows:
No more than 50 percent of the amount paid by the government to the prime may be paid to firms, at any tier, that are not similarly situated, and in addition

  • Any work that a similarly situated entity subcontractor further subcontracts to an entity that is not similarly situated will count toward the 50 percent subcontract amount.
  • A similar 50 percent limitation applies to the amount paid by the government for supply contracts; a 15 percent limitation is applied to the amount paid by the government for construction contracts.

Accordingly, under the new rule a small business prime is barred from subcontracting more than 50 percent of the amount paid by the government under the prime contract, unless a subcontract is to a similarly situated entity, i.e., a subcontractor with the same small business program status as the prime contractor. Thus, a HUBZone small business prime contractor can subcontract to another HUBZone small business subcontractor without it counting toward the 50 percent limitation. That HUBZone small business prime contractor, however, will have to count a subcontract to a woman-owned small business toward the 50 percent limitation, because it is not a similarly situated entity.

The SBA has gone a step further from Congress. The 2013 NDAA focused only on prime contractor restrictions. This limitation, however, could allow a similarly situated subcontractor – to which the 50 percent limitation does not count – to further subcontract some or all of the value of its contract to a large business. Thus, on a $100,000 set-aside, a HUBZone small business prime contractor could subcontract $75,000 of the amount paid by the government to another HUBZone small business. That subcontractor, in turn, could subcontract some – or all – of its subcontract to a large business. The SBA proposes to block that loophole by imposing limitations to contractors at any tier, and specifies that subcontracts to entities that are not similarly situated will count toward the rule’s limitations. This would bar the HUBZone small business subcontractor in the example above from subcontracting too much work to a large business subcontractor.

The wording of the proposed new rules also would dramatically simplify the methodology for determining how the percentage of subcontracting is calculated. For both services and supplies, the percentage is calculated simply as a percentage of the amount paid by the government to the prime. This is a substantial change from the current calculation methodology, as services contractors who have spent time and effort determining the “cost of contract performance incurred for personnel” will attest.

The SBA has proposed significant penalties for small business prime contractors that misrepresent compliance with the rule. Those penalties include imprisonment for up to 10 years, and a fine that is the greater of $500,000 or the dollar amount spent in excess of the permitted levels for subcontracting.

The Bottom Line: What You Should Know

Under the SBA’s proposed rule, small business primes must be vigilant in tracking the amount of work subcontracted throughout their subcontracting chain, particularly the work subcontracted by similarly situated entities. Failure to keep track of subcontracting could result in the contracting team exceeding the 50 percent limitation on subcontracting without the prime contractor’s knowledge, and risk an accusation that the prime misrepresented compliance with the rule.

Small Business Subcontracting Plan Requirements

The SBA proposes to toughen up requirements pertaining to small business subcontracting plans, which could have significant consequences for large business prime contractors.

  • Reporting Fraudulent Activity or Bad Faith: The SBA proposes to allow small business concerns and commercial market representatives (CMRs) to report fraudulent activity or bad faith behavior by large business prime contractors with respect to their subcontracting plans. Reports would be made to the SBA’s Area Office where the firm is headquartered.
  • Strengthening Corrective Action Plans: Large business prime contractors failing to provide a written corrective action plan after receiving a marginal or unsatisfactory rating for their subcontracting plans will be subject to material breach of contract, which will be considered in the contractor’s past performance evaluation.
  • Data Collection and Reporting: The SBA proposes to require agencies to collect, report, and review data on the extent to which each contractor meets its goals and objectives as set out in subcontracting plans.

This proposed rule, coupled with the recent rule allowing small business subcontractors to communicate directly with contracting officers about a lack of payment, will affect how large business prime contractors and their small business subcontractors interact. Failure by a large business prime contractor to reconsider a strained relationship with a small business subcontractor could lead to an allegation of fraudulent activity or bad faith with respect to small business subcontracting plan compliance. This proposal by the SBA leaves no recourse for the prime contractor to respond to allegations of fraudulent activity or bad faith, which could have significant adverse effects for contractors.

The Bottom Line: What You Should Know

Under the SBA’s proposed rule, large businesses must be aware of increasing scrutiny about small business subcontracting. The SBA’s proposed rule does not specify that any of the data collected on its subcontracting plan will be limited. Therefore, representations as to plan compliance under one contract must be consistent with plan compliance under another contract, or a large business prime runs the risk of allegations of making false statements to its agency customers.

Submitting Comments

Contractors wishing to submit comments on these proposed rules can do so through regulations.gov by searching for RIN: 3245-AG58. Comments are due by February 27, 2015.


Continue following Venable’s Small Business Series for additional analysis and take-aways from the SBA’s proposed rule implementing the 2013 NDAA. If you have any questions about how these proposed rules could affect your business, please contact any of Venable’s authors: Keir Bancroft, Paul Debolt, Dismas Locaria, Rob Burton, Rebecca Pearson, James Boland, Nathaniel Canfield, or Anna Pulliam.

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NVTC is inviting members and industry leaders to serve as guest bloggers, sharing insights and information on trends or business issues relevant to other members. This week, Elizabeth Harr of member company Hinge Marketing shares five reasons social media impacts your business in a measurable way.


With numerous social media platforms to keep track of — each their own little world with a specific set of participation standards — it’s no wonder that many marketers are asking “is this worth it?” Between the tweets, shares, status updates, pins and likes, maintaining a strong social media presence can be time consuming and confusing. Social Media Examiner’s latest industry report revealed that marketers spend a minimum of six hours per week on their social media accounts — nearly an entire day’s work.

It’s understandable that you’d want to see measurable impact from your technology firm’s social media marketing if you’re putting in all that effort. social-media-tree-icon
Perhaps the easiest way to answer the question of “is this worth it?” is to look to your clients. How are they researching their technology needs? What factors are they considering when making a purchasing decision? Where are they looking? More often than not, your buyers are starting with a basic online search, glancing through the first page of results, and checking out their options from there.

Combined with a well-rounded digital marketing strategy, social media can add the extra boost your technology firm needs to get you on that first page of search engine results. Once prospective buyers find you, social media can play a role in closing the sale. And to really drive home exactly why social media marketing is “worth it,” here’s a list of benefits that can help improve your bottom line.

5 Ways Social Media Marketing Benefits Your Technology Firm 

It Boosts Your Search Engine Rankings

Your buyers aren’t likely to look past that first page of results. Luckily, a strong social media presence can help your technology firm be one of the first options they see. Having more backlinks to your website helps to improve your ranking and social media is the perfect platform to share those links and increase your search engine optimization.

It Increases Referral Traffic

Thanks to Google Analytics, you can see exactly what types of posts on which social media platforms are driving traffic to your site. Learn from your results and focus on the types of posts that are generating the most visitors.

It Helps Establish Your Brand

When a prospective buyer finds your website, they’re probably going to poke around to see if your priorities and personality match their own. Social media is a great way for potential clients to get to “know” your technology firm. The information you share can help position you as a trusted authority in your field.

It Can Build Your Contacts List

You can use your social media accounts to promote premium content that drives visitors to your website. In order to download the content, ask visitors to enter in some basic contact information to build up your email lists. Sticking to requiring nothing more than a name and email address will help increase your conversions for the content.

It Can Be a Great Promotional Tool

Promoting offers on social media requires you to walk a fine line. Your followers don’t want to see an excess of promotional content, but you can still publicize offers as long as they’re mixed in with predominantly informational content.

Though the time commitment of social media marketing might seem overwhelming to your technology firm at times, employing it as part of your digital marketing strategy can help you acquire new clients. Between increasing your online visibility, driving traffic to your website and establishing your credibility in the industry, social media is, without a doubt, “worth it.”

Check out Hinge’s free Social Media Guide for tips on increasing your social media footprint.


Elizabeth Harr is a partner at Hinge, a marketing and branding firm for professional services. Elizabeth is an accomplished entrepreneur and experienced executive with a background in strategic planning, brand building, and communications. She is the coauthor of Inside the Buyer’s Brain, How Buyers Buy: Technology Services Edition and Online Marketing for Professional Services: Technology Services Edition.

 

 

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Building Relationships: Developing the Relationship

April 22nd, 2014 | Posted by Sarah Jones in Guest Blogs - (Comments Off)

NVTC is inviting members and industry leaders to serve as guest bloggers, sharing insights and information on trends or business issues relevant to other members. In the four of a five part series on “Building Relationships,” Matthew Falls of BusinessUSA shares his insights on maintaining relationships with customers.


You’ve done whatever follow-up resulted from your conversation and it’s time to make the follow up call, or set the meeting. Again, prepare: research beyond the web site, set the agenda and focus beforehand with your contact. This is very important – it moves the conversation forward, lays the stage for the expected action items and demonstrates respect for the other person in that you are prepared for the call and do not intend to waste their time.

Dig deeper – look behind what’s in front of you – talk to multiple people – find out the real story, not just what’s on the web site. Look for ways to bring more value to meetings. Think beyond the meeting to your ultimate goals for this relationship. Focus on the person that you’re speaking with, the action item and how you can help this person.

If you are focusing on the other person and their needs, you can be patient and let the conversation progress naturally. trustSharpen your customer conversation skills. Ask about their interests, what’s important to them. It’s very important to cultivate the human side of relationships to get beyond the standard speech.

You can find out what they are willing to do and capable of doing, by listening to throwaway comments or venting, especially those made in frustration, they exhibit true feelings not stated. Cultivating the human side of relationships develops the trust that makes your contact feel comfortable enough to reveal such information, indicating pain points that your solution can solve.

Your goal is to come away from this first call with points of pain. It’s important to be aware of where you are in the process versus where you want to be and figure out how to advance to next stage – bring in an idea that adds value to them. Each conversation should build on the previous conversation; if you are having the same conversation, they are not ready.

There may not be any apparent points of pain. That’s ok. Keep the conversation going with contacts by looking at them and their business as a whole and send them information, interesting items, bits of news. Become a resource to them. Over time they may introduce you to opportunities, or pain points may be revealed. Your relationships should also give you intelligence about upcoming opportunities.

If you are a federal contractor or sub-contractor, bringing business to the prime obviously will make them see you as a resource and an ideal teaming partner. With contracting trends indicating that 1 of 4 contracts are multiple award vehicles, teaming decisions are often made before the Statement of Work is issued, so developing and expanding teaming relationships become critical to the success of the company.

Many contracts result from being on a team. Not just any team though, the right team. You also want to make your company desirable to the right team. A strategic advisor focused on generating revenue can assess your company, help you determine your core competencies, develop strategies to get on the right team and negotiate a teaming agreement that brings value to all team members.

All of this great research and preparation won’t deliver results if you can’t deliver the message to the customer. Take the time to practice so that you will be more confident in the moment. Anticipate how the call will play out and do some role playing.

Use the seasons analogy to guide the building of your relationships – plant the seed – introduce yourself – nurture the relationship – become a resource to them, send information, make introductions, etc. – harvest the seeds – if you have nurtured the relationship, the harvest time becomes apparent – enjoy the fruits – take the time to enjoy your success – start to think about new opportunities.


Matthew Falls works for the federal initiative BusinessUSA, focusing on outreach to the state and local partners and the business community.  He collaborates with state and local economic development organizations to feature their program content on BusinessUSA and to introduce BusinessUSA as a resource to small businesses. 

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In late September 2011, LinkedIn added new functionality that allows contacts to endorse each other with a single click. This tool is not meant to replace one’s ability to write a detailed recommendation, it’s just meant to increase and simplify the opportunity to endorse others.

True recommendations are often difficult to receive. The time it takes to create a meaningful post for a contact’s profile frequently slows down and hinders the process. Many say that they are willing to show support of their colleagues, but writing a strong recommendation takes thought and effort.

LinkedIn recognizes this fact and now provides a one click option that allows users to quickly and easily recognize contacts for their skills and expertise. This new feature has already become popular and is receiving significant attention.

linkedin

Here are some of the basics to take advantage of while using the Endorsement tool:

Add your abilities to your profile – Under the Skills & Expertise section, select the capabilities to show your experience and proficiencies. Make sure your privacy settings allow others to see this feature.

Ask for endorsements – Like recommendations, it is best to reach out to your connections and ask for their blessing. Avoid asking contacts that may not know you well enough to feel comfortable recommending you.

Endorse others – View the profiles of your colleagues, clients, partners and prospects. Select the skills that you truly believe they possess. Remember that NVTC.org is filled with many of your most trusted contacts.

Avoid blindly endorsing contacts – It is very easy to use this feature. It is almost too easy. Endorsements will lose value if anyone and everyone receives them for every skillset on their profiles.

You can do this quickly and you will likely receive endorsements for any expertise that you have developed throughout your career.

Once you are ready, start clicking!

Connect with me on Twitter @AndrewBates or LinkedIn

 

andrewbates

Andrew Bates is the director of online marketing at Hinge Marketing in Reston, Va. He is responsible for managing all of Hinge’s digital marketing strategies and services. These services include search engine optimization, social media, paid search and media advertising, email lead generation as well as comprehensive web analytics. Bates has developed custom online marketing and social media programs for organizations that include Chevron, the American Cancer Society, DuPont and Rosetta Stone. A self-described super geek entrepreneur, Bates helped create and lead two Washington, D.C. area design and marketing firms, both acquired by industry giants. He has been an active member of NVTC for 10 years, serving on multiple committees.

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