NVTC is inviting members and industry leaders to serve as guest bloggers, sharing insights and information on trends or business issues relevant to other members. This week, NVTC member company Carpathia discusses the upcoming year, predicting a transformative 2015 for government agencies and enterprises.


At the start of a new year we have the opportunity to look ahead and think about what trends will likely shape the coming months. 2015 is poised to be transformative for government agencies and enterprises, as an increasing number of organizations look to modernize their computing environments, expand their focus on secure and compliant hosting, and meet the growing demands of an increasingly mobile workforce. What trends will we see emerge this year?

Here are the top seven predictions we see for 2015:

  1. Hybrid Cloud Grows Up and “Gets Real” – Out of the buzz created by incredibly rapid IT technology advancements, the industry will finally emerge with a firm understanding of the gamut of “hybrid” options thanks to best practices derived from real-world cloud deployments.
  1. Compliance’s Operational Impacts Will Continue To Expand – Are your prepared to pass that next audit? After years of struggling with time-consuming and complex compliance processes and procedures, enterprises, agencies, and auditors alike will be even busier! But there is some light at the end of the tunnel – and it comes in the form of automation.
  1. Privacy Will Be Everywhere – Whether it’s electronic protected health information (ePHI) driven by ACA or information traveling between public and private cloud environments, harnessing and protecting data will be a focal point of every government and enterprise IT initiative.
  1. Agencies Get Cozier With Public Cloud – Government cloud computing adoption will hit its stride. Agencies will finally start moving a great number of workloads (and even some mission-critical ones) into the public cloud with FedRAMP authorized providers.
  1. Verticalized Cloud Communities Become the Next Boomtowns – There’s no one-size-fits all when it comes to cloud. As a result, industries with common compliance standards, such as healthcare, will turn to cloud service providers that can act as community organizers or hubs. In 2015, we’ll see the increasing emergence of vertical-centric cloud communities that can effectively cater to industry-specific needs and requirements.
  1. New Tools Will Enhance Infrastructure and Application Performance – Spurred on by rapid software development, software-defined networks, and faster hardware technology, rapid maturation of industry tools and services will help organizations enhance the performance of IaaS, public, private and hybrid cloud solutions in the coming year. Expect affordable resources that will extract even more value in the form of greater flexibility, security and self-service, alongside service-focused offerings from providers.
  1. Real-time Data-Centric Decisions Are the New Norm – In 2015, we’ll see IT-enabled data-centric decisions across platforms become common practice for many organizations. Deeper insight into usage patterns and greater visibility into network operations and performance across computing infrastructure will allow organizations to make better-informed decisions about workload allocations and respond faster to enterprise nee

Do you agree with Carpathia’s predictions? Let them know on Facebook or Twitter. In addition, follow NVTC on Facebook and Twitter! We would love to hear your thoughts on what trends will be game-changers in 2015.

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Notes from the Silicon Valley Cybersecurity Summit: Part 2

September 30th, 2014 | Posted by Sarah Jones in Guest Blogs - (Comments Off)

NVTC is inviting members to serve as guest bloggers, sharing insights and information on trends or business issues relevant to other members. Kathy Stershic of member company Dialog Research & Communications shares her insights below.


While the policy panel discussion at the summer’s Silicon Valley Cyber Security Summit pointed out the many challenges of governments trying to deal with the cyber threat, the second ‘Next Generation’ panel was all about the shortage of qualified talent to deal with the problem.

The good news – cyber presents a great career opportunity! As in, the industry needs lots of help. Now. The not so good news is that 40 percent of open IT security jobs in 2015 will be vacant. There simply aren’t enough qualified people to fill them. Technologies such as new threat intelligence and attack remediation products will continue to advance. That will help automate intervention, but there is still a need for people to skillfully apply them, and for others to create them in the first place in the face of a never-ending game of new threats. One speaker said that, as of only a couple of years ago, a new malware was detected every 15 seconds. Now two new malwares are detected every one second! The speakers expected that pace to accelerate exponentially.

There are a growing number of formal university programs in this area, but I was very surprised to hear that only 12 percent of computer science majors are female, and that population has been steadily shrinking for two decades. A marginal percent of those study cyber. So we’ve got a challenge with public engagement in the issue, an inadequate talent pool, and almost half of the student population not thinking about the problem.

Of course not all software learning is in the classroom and talented hackers do emerge. That is why General Keith Alexander [former head of U.S. CyberCommand] went to least year’s Black Hat Conference – while unconventional, he knew this is a place to find badly needed talent. There are also several incubator initiatives like  Virginia’s Mach37, and many startups are trying to get off the ground.

Another challenge is that CEOs don’t fundamentally understand the complex cyber problem, so they delegate the task to the CIO. [This reminds me of similar dispositions toward Disaster Readiness and Business Continuity Planning pre-9/11]. Cyber threat is another form of business risk and should be planned for as such. One speaker mentioned that there is expert consensus, even from VCs who are scrupulous about how money is spent, that for a $100 million IT budget, 5-15 percent should be spent on security. While panelists noted cyber threat is a top discussion point for many corporate boards, there is uncertainty about what to actually do to prepare.

This is a tough issue all the way around. One speaker suggested repositioning the brand message to what regular folk will respond to – protecting our national treasures, homes and quality of life, critical infrastructure and national security. Nick Shevelyov, Chief Security Officer of Silicon Valley Bank, summarized the issue: ‘the technology that empowers us also imperils us.” I’m hoping more of us come to understand that and step up.


Contributed by Kathy Stershic, Principal Consultant, Dialog Research & Communications

kstershic@dialogrc.com

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In Case You Missed It: Linda Hudson

February 4th, 2014 | Posted by Sarah Jones in Events - (Comments Off)

1401__titanslindahudson079webOn Jan. 30, Linda Hudson, then-president and CEO of BAE Systems, who retired just this past Saturday (Feb. 1), addressed a packed crowd of NVTC members and colleagues at The Ritz-Carlton Tysons Corner. In her keynote speech, which was her last pre-retirement public appearance, she brought attention to the STEM workforce shortage and challenged the audience to engage students from middle school on up. Read our article on the event and the full text of her script here.

One of her most thought-provoking topics was the idea that the academia is “throwing the babies out with the bathwater.” Instead of promoting an inclusive environment, engaging students and recruiting them, academic institutions are still using “weed out” classes to discourage students from continuing in STEM programs. She credited Freeman Hrabowski, president of the University of Maryland Baltimore County, for promoting the idea that we should be working to keep students in the program, not cutting them out. Check out his TED talk on the subject!

Hudson also quoted Malcolm Gladwell, who explains in his most recent book, David and Goliath, why going to an elite school may actually decrease the rate of success for STEM students. According to Gladwell, “Your odds of successfully getting a math degree fall by two percentage points for every ten point increase in the average SAT score of your peers,” meaning the more competitive the school, the less likely a student is to graduate in a STEM field. Hudson and Gladwell attribute the decrease in success to a student’s discouragement when his or her scores aren’t as high as their peers’.

In order to improve the current structure, Hudson called on the audience to understand why students, and specifically minority and female students, embark on a STEM careers less often than their peers.

So, what do you think? Should elite institutions revise their policies? Do STEM students have a better chance at a less prestigious school? How else should the industry be encouraging inclusiveness in STEM education (and the STEM workforce)? Tell is in the comments below.

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