This week on NVTC’s blog, Jim McCarthy of member company AOC Key Solutions Jim McCarthy of member company AOC Key Solutions shares suggestions for not only surviving, but also thriving amidst the occasional dysfunction in government contracting.


When you win, government contracting is among the most satisfying of careers. Unfortunately, the crucible we call a Proposal Center can, at times, degenerate into a witches’ brew of dysfunction. One where there exists a dark confluence of long hours, suboptimal working conditions, relentless deadlines, hidden agendas, political infighting, rampant egos, intractable issues, morose review teams, cranky bosses, and cold pizza. No wonder proposals sometime magnify the worst in us. But, when handled correctly, dysfunction can also spark the finest in us. Here are suggestions for not only surviving, but thriving, amidst the occasional toxicity endemic to Government Contracting.

1. Be a Part of the Solution, Government Proposals are hard enough. Commit from day one not to be part of the problem. Be part of the solution—a breath of fresh air in the war room. Offer constructive suggestions.  Be a problem solver, not a problem compounder.

2. Regard It As an Opportunity to Learn. Get metaphysical. Discern why you are going through this time of adversity and testing. What lesson are you being taught? Be open.

3. Remember the Mission. Your company is bidding an important contract. By helping it win, you help your company help others. Take solace that you are part of something worthwhile that matters.

4. Focus on Positives, Not Negatives. Radiate enthusiasm. Don’t be a black hole absorbing all light and energy from the proposal. Count continuously the things going right.

5. Help a Colleague. Make it about others, not you. Volunteer. Help those sharing the foxhole with you. Look for another person—perhaps younger than you, and commit to making him or her a success. Helping others animates even the most grueling proposal.

6. Support Your Boss. Under pressure? Imagine what confronts your leader. Help ease the hard times squeezing the boss. Be loyal. Give the boss the benefit of the doubt. Speak highly of him or her.

7. Don’t Take It Personally. Problems are endemic to life, business, and proposals. Check your ego at the reception desk. Be objective rather than internalizing the dysfunction.

8. Examine Yourself First. Before playing the blame game, reflect on how you may be part of the problem. Anger, resentment, frustration, and finger-pointing are infectious. Often, we are most critical of others in the very areas where we are weakest.

9. Change What Is Under Your Control, Accept the Rest. Stress and worry contribute not one iota to solving anything. Fix what you can. Change how you think about everything else. Shifting one’s attitude typically brings about altered behavior.

10. Watch Your Mouth.  Don’t whine, gossip, backbite, nitpick, rumor monger, second-guess, engage in character assassination, question another’s motives, or utter any comments that erode the sense of the proposal team. Don’t pour gasoline on the fire. Bad karma in a proposal center eventually dooms your efforts.

11. Take the Pause That Refreshes. As you near a crescendo or breaking point, leave. Take a walk. Grab a cup of coffee. Sit in your car. Breathe. Use a quick break to center yourself. Once renewed, rejoin the fray and redouble your efforts.

12. Maintain Work Life Balance. You cannot perform your best when you feel your worst.  Diet, exercise, spirituality, family involvement, quiet time, hobbies, reading, healthy sleep habits—first take care of yourself. Only then are you equipped for the proposal grind.

13. Set a Good Example. People are watching you. You are either a good role model or a bad one.  It really does come down to the choice you make.

14. Sweat Not the Small Stuff. And, as author Richard Carlson says on occasions, “it’s all small stuff.”

15. Invoke Your Pressure Release Mechanism.  Tamp down on the valve to discharge steam when needed.  Keep your outlook positive, not pressurized. If you don’t have a release mechanism, find one.

16.  Act Gently and Cultivate Empathy. Never pile on. Don’t tread on those are already weighed down. Lighten another’s load. Observe your teammates, allies, critics, and rivals–you may think you know what they are going through, but you don’t. Like you, everyone is on a private journey with rocky patches. Everyone stumbles—if not today, then soon. Be an encourager.

By applying these suggestions, you emerge from adversity, stronger, more resilient, and better equipped to handle the next challenge. Surely, it will come—not if, but when.


Jim McCarthy is the Founder & Principal of AOC Key Solutions, a proposal consulting firm dedicated to helping companies win government contracts. Mr. McCarthy’s career spans over 30 years of proposal development, market strategy, and oral presentation coaching to federal contractors. Learn more at www.aockeysolutions.com

 

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Changes to the Nonmanufacturer Rule

March 17th, 2015 | Posted by Sarah Jones in Guest Blogs - (Comments Off)

This week on NVTC’s blog, member company Venable shares Calculation of Annual Receipts, Recertification Requirements, and Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned and HUBZone Small Business Regulations,” part four of their five part series on the SBA’s Proposed Rules to Implement the 2013 NDAA. This post focuses on SBA’s proposal to exempt acquisitions valued between $3,000 to $150,000 from the nonmanufacturer rule.


The SBA is proposing to exempt acquisitions valued between $3,000 to $150,000 from the nonmanufacturer rule. The nonmanufacturer rule is an exception to the limitations on subcontracting for small business set-aside supply contracts. In essence, if the small business awardee cannot perform 50% of the cost of manufacturing the items on its own, the nonmanufacturer rule allows a small business that is engaged in the wholesale or retail trade to supply the items as long as they are manufactured by a small business in the United States. By exempting all acquisitions valued between $3,000 to $150,000 from the nonmanufacturer rule, agencies will be permitted to purchase supplies from small business resellers on a set-aside basis without regard to the size of the manufacturer or the location of manufacturing.

The SBA’s stated intent is to incentivize small business set-asides by eliminating the need to request waivers from the nonmanufacturer rule, which the SBA suggests would delay the procurement by several weeks. The SBA believes that agencies will be more likely to set aside an acquisition valued between $3,000 to $150,000 for small businesses if they do not have to request a waiver from SBA if no small business manufacturers are available. Given that agencies are already required to set aside acquisitions valued between $3,000 and $150,000 for small businesses pursuant to Section 15(j) of the Small Business Act, however, it is unclear how a permanent “waiver” as envisioned in the proposed rule will meaningfully increase the number of small business set asides. While the proposed rule would appear to streamline a process that is already taking place, such as routine waivers for brand name computers, it may also have an unintended adverse impact on small businesses. By eliminating the nonmanufacturer rule for these smaller acquisitions across the board, the SBA may actually incentivize the acquisition of supplies manufactured by large businesses and/or those outside of the United States – through a small business prime contractor – using multiple, individual contracts not exceeding $150,000 since these acquisitions would be exempt from the nonmanufacturer rule. In such a scenario, the majority of the economic benefit of the “small business” contract would flow to the large manufacturer.

Under existing requirements, per FAR 19.502-2(c), a waiver is only obtainable when no small business manufacturers are available. In contrast, under the proposed rule, a small business would be permitted to supply the items of a large business or non-domestic manufacturer irrespective of whether small business manufacturers in the United States are available.

In addition to this proposed change, the proposed rule includes several changes to the regulation governing waivers. Included among them is a provision that would allow agencies to execute a waiver for an individual contract both after proposal submission and after contract award, if an in-scope modification requires the delivery of supplies that cannot be sourced from a domestic, small business manufacturer.The Bottom Line: What You Should Know

The proposed changes to the nonmanufacturer rule would exempt awardees of small business set-aside supply contracts valued between $3,000 and $150,000 from the current requirement that they source from domestic small business manufacturers. While the stated aim is to encourage the use of small business set-asides, the new rule may actually result in greater utilization of large business manufacturers.

Contractors wishing to submit comments on these proposed rules can do so through regulations.gov by searching for RIN: 3245-AG58. Comments are due by February 27, 2015.


Continue following Venable’s Small Business Series for additional analysis and take-aways from the SBA’s proposed rule implementing the 2013 NDAA. If you have any questions about how these proposed rules could affect your business, please contact any of our authors: Keir BancroftPaul DeboltDismas LocariaRob BurtonRebecca PearsonJames BolandNathaniel Canfield, or Anna Pulliam.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS